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Vegan Baking Recipes Fats Vegan Butter Recipes How to Make Vegan Butter - Regular Vegan Butter - Coconut Oil Base

How to Make Vegan Butter - Regular Vegan Butter - Coconut Oil Base Mattie

Written by Mattie    
 
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Vegan Butter

Butter is one of those ingredients that can be so central to baking that as soon as some people hear the term vegan baking they wonder aloud almost in a panic, “what about the butter?!” Many vegan baked items get along great with fats like canola, coconut oil or even olive oil. These types of fats work wonders for cakes, cookies, bars and breads. When designing recipes where we need something to act like butter, things start to get complicated. Solid fats like butter and margarine are integral to things like puff pastry, pie crust, shortbread, croissants, danish dough and certain cakes. This is because in these cases the fat is used to coat the flour so gluten doesn't develop too much and also trap air bubbles to enhance leavening and texture. The only option in these instances is to turn to a margarine or similar vegan butter that is solid at room temperature and gets soft as it melts so it blends to one cohesive mass of dough.

Vegan butter options as of this writing are pretty slim. If you're lucky, you have access to Earth Balance Buttery Sticks or Spectrum Spread (tub margarine is a no-no in baking due to its excessive water and salt content). These margarines utilize a blend of fats, water, starches and gums to mimic real butter. If you're unlucky you only have access to other margarines which use a process called partial hydrogenation to solidify vegetable (usually soy) oil. This hydrogenation process alters the fat structure which also happens to create compounds called trans fatty acids that are highly toxic to the body. Toxic to the point of where finding local, sustainably raised real butter would ironically probably be a better pseudo-vegan alternative in the grand scheme of things.

Non-hydrogenated vegan margarines aren't knights in shining buttery armor either. Lots of them use palm oil which, as of this writing, is currently associated with rainforest destruction due to its rising popularity as regions like Sumatra scramble to devote more land to its production without respecting the environment. Imagine that: a vegan option that actually leads to habitat destruction. There are efforts currently underway to sustainably cultivate palm oil but as vegans know, the best way to really know that you're not contributing to it is to just not buy it.

I've never been a huge fan of margarines because I find that they're so packed with chemicals and stabilizers that they frequently remind me of what it would be like to chew on a candle on a hot day. Have you ever done a taste test with butter and margarine? Butter dissolves away on the tongue and margarine overstays its welcome by a long shot, leaving a gummy residue lingering on. Loving a challenge, I decided to do something about this lack of quality vegan butter and give my best shot to making my own alternative. Lucky for us, this turned out to be much easier than I thought and I think I may have opened a buttery portal to give vegan bakers a little more power to innovate with the flavor of their recipes. White Chocolate Almond Croissants anyone? 

I make Vegan Butter in large batches and store it in my freezer. The night before I bake I transfer it to my refrigerator or kitchen counter depending on the consistency my recipe calls for.

Understanding Real Butter

To create vegan butter we must understand real butter. Real butter consists of about 78% fat, 18% water and 4% milk solids. In Europe, the fat is usually even higher in proportion to the water. The milk solids are responsible for emulsifying the fat and water, adding additional flavor and allowing the margarine to melt softly. I decided that in order to have a tasty vegan drop-in replacement for butter and margarine in things like laminated doughs and pie crusts, I'd have to stick to these figures. And heck, I'd might as well do my best to make it taste awesome as a spread too.

Real butter comes from heavy cream. The fat globules in the cream are completely surrounded and suspended in a network of emulsifying compounds in the water. As you shake the cream, the fats get shaken out of their emulsifying network, find each other and join together. As they join together they start to solidify and the water can be drained away to a point. The result is butter.

Designing Vegan Butter

In regards to fat I'd have to use something that's solid at room temperature and not be palm oil due to the environmental issues associated with it. Coconut oil is perfect for this application because it's available refined (unflavored) and unrefined (with coconut flavor intact). Cocoa butter comes in a close second but let's face it- it has an overwhelming chocolate flavor. So I developed a bonus White Chocolate Vegan Butter so there. Here's to hoping coconut oil and cocoa butter production don't lead to habitat destruction as their popularity rises.

Coconut oil supposedly has health benefits over other fats but as of this writing it really depends on who you talk to. One camp insists that coconut fat is made up of medium-chain fatty acids that are small enough to the point of where they don't get stored as much as other fats and result in quick-burning energy. This camp also insists that the high amount of saturated fat in coconut oil isn't detrimental to health as other saturated fats. The other camp pledges that all saturated fats are bad and should be avoided. I personally think it's too early to say one is right and the other is wrong and happily exercise the everything in moderation approach.

It would be pretty easy to make a fat with the consistency of butter but how would I mimic the flavor without resorting to chemicals? I'm a firm believer in the power of curdling and fermentation. Fermentation and curdling involve hundreds of chemical reactions that produce a multitude of complex flavor compounds with a depth that can't be replicated by chemicals. I know that dairy products like cultured butter and crème fraiche involve a certain level of fermentation; you can even buy the cultures at cheese making stores and make it yourself. I wasn't interested in the complexity of fermenting before mixing my ingredients though. This would probably be more trouble than it was worth. What if I simply curdled non-dairy milk to build the flavor I was looking for?

Non-Dairy Milk Curdling

Curdling involves adding acids to a liquid that causes the proteins to unravel like balls of yarn. As the proteins unravel, their strands line up, join together and tighten. This tightening causes tiny clumps in the mixture and also generates a large array of flavors that add a significant amount of depth to almost anything you bake it with. You may have noticed how much of a fan of curdled non-dairy milk I am due to how often I use it in my recipes on Veganbaking.net.

Several weeks prior to these vegan butter experiments I conducted tests with different non-dairy milks to see how they vary in curdling in regards to taste. I ended up curdling a half cup of soy, hemp, almond, rice and coconut milks each in 1 teaspoon of apple cider vinegar for 10 minutes, then analyzing thickness and flavor. The results were surprising: Soy milk curdled the most and had the most complex flavor (think buttermilk), followed by hemp milk, then almond milk. Coconut milk and rice milk didn't curdle at all. This confirmed my theory that curdling is directly proportional to the amount of protein in the non-diary milk. This makes perfect sense after the explanation of curling above. This vegan butter was going to have to use soy milk. You could probably make a cashew purèe to use for this base if you're not keen on soy, however I haven't tried this yet as of this writing. Banana Vegan Butter doesn't use curdling to build flavor so this is an option for those interested in eliminating soy. It can also be made raw.

Due to this discovery of the flavor-building properties of soy milk curdled with acid, I'll be using soy milk exclusively when I want to build flavor in this manner from here on out.

Emulsifiers and stabilizers

Now that I had the fat and flavor-building ingredients down, I needed to bring everything together into a smooth cohesive, malleable mass that could be worked into dough, creamed into airy masses for cakes and spread onto hearty toast. Emulsifiers are compounds that bind together oil-based ingredients and water-based ingredients into one mixture. I decided to use soy lecithin for this purpose due to its affordability and effectiveness. Xanthan gum was developed in the mid 20th century from the slimy grime that grows on vegetables in the refrigerator. It so happens that this vegetable gum is a wonder ingredient, acting as both an emulsifier and a stabilizer. A stabilizer can hold air bubbles and support structure.

You can forgo the addition of xanthan gum in these bread spreads if you're obsessive about only using ingredients in their most natural state. Keep in mind that if you do choose to not use xanthan gum the spreads won't be as malleable as butter and its alternatives so it may be difficult to work with in some recipes. It also won't be able to hold air bubbles when whipped.

I decided to walk a fine line in regards to salt in this bread spread. You may laugh at the measurement of ¼ + 1/8 teaspoon salt in many of the recipes below but I wanted the salt level to be adequate to taste buttery on toast but not be too salty to negatively affect being a drop-in replacement in baking applications.

I ended up fine tuning this formula and the results worked so well I developed five variants: Vegan Butter, Coconut Vegan Butter, Three Herbed Vegan Butter, Banana Vegan Butter and White Chocolate Vegan Butter. Use these bread spreads anywhere you would use regular butter or margarine. I must say I'm baffled as to why this hasn't been done before and promptly placed on the market. A vegan butter that doesn't use space-age ingredients would surely fly off store shelves, even if it were relatively expensive.

When making these vegan butters it's highly recommended that you use a silicone mold like the Tovolo King Cube Extra Large Silicone Ice Cube Tray. This will allow you to make gorgeous butter cubes that can easily be slid out of the molds.

Vegan Butter in an ice cube tray

Find out how to make Regular Vegan Butter with Cocoa Butter as a base

This is regular 'ol Vegan Butter that's designed to mimic your favorite commercial variant. Use it wherever you use butter or vegan butter. Vegan Butter is designed to mimic real butter in vegan baking applications. Like real butter, Vegan Butter is more solid than tub margarine and not as spreadable. This is so it can perform optimally in vegan baking applications. If your goal is to have a conveniently softer, spreadable Vegan Butter, swap out 1 Tablespoon of the coconut oil with 1 additional Tablespoon canola, safflower or sunflower oil.

Regular Vegan Butter Recipe - Coconut Oil Base

¼ cup + 2 teaspoons soy milk
1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
¼ + 1/8 teaspoon salt

½ cup + 2 Tablespoons + 1 teaspoon (130 grams) refined coconut oil, melted
1 Tablespoon canola oil, safflower oil or sunflower oil

1 teaspoon liquid soy lecithin -or- liquid sunflower lecithin -or- 2 ¼ teaspoons  soy lecithin granules
¼ teaspoon xanthan gum

1) Curdle your soy milk

Place the soy milk, apple cider vinegar and salt in a small cup and whisk together with a fork. Let it sit for about 10 minutes so the mixture curdles.

2) Mix your Vegan Butter ingredients

Melt the coconut oil in a microwave so it's barely melted and as close to room temperature as possible. Measure it and add it and the canola oil to a food processor. Making smooth vegan butter is dependent on the mixture solidifying as quickly as possible after it's mixed. This is why it's important to make sure your coconut oil is as close to room temperature as possible before you mix it with the rest of the ingredients.

3) Transfer the Vegan Butter to a mold so it solidifies

Add the soy milk mixture, soy lecithin and xanthan gum to the food processor. Process for 2 minutes, scraping down the sides halfway through the duration. Pour the mixture into a mold and place it in the freezer to solidify. An ice cube mold works well. The vegan butter should be ready to use in about an hour. Store it in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 month or wrapped in plastic wrap in the freezer for up to 1 year. Makes 1 cup (215 grams), or the equivalent of 2 sticks vegan butter.

Vegan Butter cubes

Assorted Vegan Butters

For more vegan butter recipes check out the Vegan Butter section.


Get a price on the Liquid Soy Lecithin I Recommend at Amazon.




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4.9  (123)
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Hi Mattie. I have looked and looked I cannot find Guar and Xantham gum. I used agar agar but I think the boiling of the soy milk to activate the agar agar changes the taste profile. Can I leave it out?
Reviewed by marijke April 16, 2014

use Xanthan gum or guar gum

Hi Mattie. I have looked and looked I cannot find Guar and Xantham gum. I used agar agar but I think the boiling of the soy milk to activate the agar agar changes the taste profile. Can I leave it out?

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Have now made pancakes and muffins using this butter. All turned out WONDERFULLY. My skeptical roommate has liked everything so far...and I can bake again!
Rating 
 
5.0
deblewis87 Reviewed by deblewis87 April 13, 2014
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LOVE this Vegan Butter!

Have now made pancakes and muffins using this butter. All turned out WONDERFULLY. My skeptical roommate has liked everything so far...and I can bake again!

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Made the butter last night, which was easy to do. Decided to make biscuits tonight to compare to regular biscuits made with butter and milk. They tasted great! My "guinea pig" room mate tried them and thought they tasted just like regular biscuits! THANKS!
Rating 
 
5.0
deblewis87 Reviewed by deblewis87 April 08, 2014
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Very Nice!

Made the butter last night, which was easy to do. Decided to make biscuits tonight to compare to regular biscuits made with butter and milk. They tasted great! My "guinea pig" room mate tried them and thought they tasted just like regular biscuits! THANKS!

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This is gold Mattie, gold!
Rating 
 
5.0
susamaphone Reviewed by susamaphone April 05, 2014
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This is gold Mattie, gold!

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As a former carnivore, the only 2 things that I've missed since making the change to a vegan diet are butter & bacon. While I've made peace with the fact that there will never be a satisfying substitute for bacon, I wasn't ready to give up on finding a better alternative than the hydrogenated frankenbutters on the market. I am absolutely over the moon for this amazing guilt-free vegan butter. The ingredients were easy to find, the recipe was simple to follow, and the result is delicious! I followed the recipe almost exactly, only adding a little extra salt (unrepentant saltaholic) The taste and texture is so much like "real" dairy butter. Thank you so much for sharing! Love, love, love it.
Rating 
 
5.0

I can't believe it's not dairy!

As a former carnivore, the only 2 things that I've missed since making the change to a vegan diet are butter & bacon. While I've made peace with the fact that there will never be a satisfying substitute for bacon, I wasn't ready to give up on finding a better alternative than the hydrogenated frankenbutters on the market. I am absolutely over the moon for this amazing guilt-free vegan butter. The ingredients were easy to find, the recipe was simple to follow, and the result is delicious! I followed the recipe almost exactly, only adding a little extra salt (unrepentant saltaholic) The taste and texture is so much like "real" dairy butter. Thank you so much for sharing! Love, love, love it.

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Can you replace the soy milk with almond or rice milk?
Reviewed by Catherine March 06, 2014

Can you replace the soy milk with almond or rice milk?

Owner's reply

Hi Catherine! I go over the viability of using different non-dairy milks in the article. Almond or rice milk is not recommended.

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I made your coconut vegan butter and it is the most delicious thing ever. In fact, I love it more than real butter. I was so surprised, it even has the sour notes of cow butter. I didn't have a silicone ice cube tray, but I did have some little foil muffin cups and I used those to mold the butter. I have a question...do you have a good source for refined/deodorized coconut oil? I'm having a hard time finding it anywhere as it seems to be frowned upon because it's processed. I really want to make a savory butter. Thanks!
Rating 
 
5.0
Reviewed by nicole March 02, 2014

Loving your butters!

I made your coconut vegan butter and it is the most delicious thing ever. In fact, I love it more than real butter. I was so surprised, it even has the sour notes of cow butter. I didn't have a silicone ice cube tray, but I did have some little foil muffin cups and I used those to mold the butter. I have a question...do you have a good source for refined/deodorized coconut oil? I'm having a hard time finding it anywhere as it seems to be frowned upon because it's processed. I really want to make a savory butter. Thanks!

Owner's reply

So glad you're loving the vegan butters nicole! I use Spectrum brand refined coconut oil. It's hard to find so I always end up buying it whenever I see it at the health food store when I see it, whether I need it or not. Spectrum should distribute throughout the US. You can always order it online too.

I'm probably "preaching to the choir", but I don't believe refined, aka deodorized coconut is detrimental to health. I think many people have issues with anything that uses the word "refined". It's my understanding that the oil is passed through a filter to remove the flavor and aroma compounds. On the molecular level the oil is still intact and not degraded. Good luck!

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Hi, thanks so much for this wonderful recipe and your detailed explanations. I'm wondering will I be able to achieve the same outcome as the original recipe if certain were substituted? For example will Flax oil work instead of the oils you have listed, and instead of using lecithin will psyllium work to achieve the same consistency; as this too is an emulsifier?
Reviewed by Mariley_224 February 26, 2014

Substitutes?

Hi, thanks so much for this wonderful recipe and your detailed explanations. I'm wondering will I be able to achieve the same outcome as the original recipe if certain were substituted? For example will Flax oil work instead of the oils you have listed, and instead of using lecithin will psyllium work to achieve the same consistency; as this too is an emulsifier?

Owner's reply

Hi Mariley! Flax oil definitely won't work because it solidifies at a different temperature. It also has a considerable off-flavor that would likely clash with butter flavors. Other commenters have had luck with psyllium husks, although I don't believe it's an emulsifier. Good luck!

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Thanks for this recipe. I find the vegan margarine here in Norway revolting and also don't think it is a product that is very healthy to use (hydrogenated fat). I make a soft 'margarine' that is suitable for spreading but I wanted something I could bake with where oil wasn't suitable. My biscuits and shortbread were lovely using this 'butter'.
I had to tweak the recipe a bit as some of the ingredients are not readily available here. I used ground flax seeds instead of xantham gum and soy lecithin powder. I'm surprised something like this isn't produced commercially.
Rating 
 
5.0
Reviewed by Josephine Austin February 19, 2014

Excellent!

Thanks for this recipe. I find the vegan margarine here in Norway revolting and also don't think it is a product that is very healthy to use (hydrogenated fat). I make a soft 'margarine' that is suitable for spreading but I wanted something I could bake with where oil wasn't suitable. My biscuits and shortbread were lovely using this 'butter'.
I had to tweak the recipe a bit as some of the ingredients are not readily available here. I used ground flax seeds instead of xantham gum and soy lecithin powder. I'm surprised something like this isn't produced commercially.

Owner's reply

So glad you're enjoying the Vegan Butter Josephine! Glad the ground flax seeds worked for you.

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I love the idea of making my own butter. However, my son just recently tested as having an allergy to casein AND soy! What other lecithins, milks, etc can I use in place of all the soy?
Hdepaulo Reviewed by Hdepaulo February 16, 2014
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What if you can't use soy?

I love the idea of making my own butter. However, my son just recently tested as having an allergy to casein AND soy! What other lecithins, milks, etc can I use in place of all the soy?

Owner's reply

No problem Hdepaulo! I have a Banana Vegan Butter here that's soy-free: http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/fats/vegan-butters/banana-vegan-butter
You could also substitute the soy milk for another soy-free non-dairy milk in this Regular Vegan Butter. The flavor won't be as buttery but it'll still work. Good luck!

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Wow, this is great. I really appreciate this recipe for making home made vegan butter. I am interested in trying but have some concerns. First off Xantham Gum is derived from GMO crops, and it is impossible to find organic. Another reviewer recommended guar gum which is an interesting recommendation, but I have read that it is used in fracking. So ethically, I would prefer another alternative, although there is no actual health risk associated with guar gum (at least less of one than xanthan gum). Secondly, are there any alternatives to soy lecithin? As soy is predominantly a GMO crop, I do not want to consume any soy products that are not certified organic. I know you give an alternative of sunflower lecithin, but I have never used sunflower in cooking, and am not knowledgeable enough about it's effects on health or the environment to use this. Any safe alternatives?
Yume Reviewed by Yume February 13, 2014
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Soy lecithin

Wow, this is great. I really appreciate this recipe for making home made vegan butter. I am interested in trying but have some concerns. First off Xantham Gum is derived from GMO crops, and it is impossible to find organic. Another reviewer recommended guar gum which is an interesting recommendation, but I have read that it is used in fracking. So ethically, I would prefer another alternative, although there is no actual health risk associated with guar gum (at least less of one than xanthan gum). Secondly, are there any alternatives to soy lecithin? As soy is predominantly a GMO crop, I do not want to consume any soy products that are not certified organic. I know you give an alternative of sunflower lecithin, but I have never used sunflower in cooking, and am not knowledgeable enough about it's effects on health or the environment to use this. Any safe alternatives?

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This is a baker's delight. My vegan, gluten free son has a bad reaction to Earth Balance. Although this doesn't have much taste at all (4/5 stars), it works well in recipes that call for butter ( Jules gluten free biscuits and cookies in particular). He uses it in potatoes as a spread. Yesterday, I quadrupled the recipe to have plenty on hand.
@Robyn, I also use the soy granules, and they are visible but don't seem to affect the texture at all. Yesterday, I ran them through a coffee grinder which did "powder" them, but still noticeable in the butter.
Rating 
 
4.0
AnneR Reviewed by AnneR February 10, 2014
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Great!

This is a baker's delight. My vegan, gluten free son has a bad reaction to Earth Balance. Although this doesn't have much taste at all (4/5 stars), it works well in recipes that call for butter ( Jules gluten free biscuits and cookies in particular). He uses it in potatoes as a spread. Yesterday, I quadrupled the recipe to have plenty on hand.
@Robyn, I also use the soy granules, and they are visible but don't seem to affect the texture at all. Yesterday, I ran them through a coffee grinder which did "powder" them, but still noticeable in the butter.

Owner's reply

So glad the Vegan Butter works well for you AnneR! I have some other varieties at http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/fats/vegan-butters that have different flavor profiles. I recommend Cultured European Style Vegan Butter if you prefer an additional complex buttery kick. Thanks for the great tip on making the soy lecithin granules smaller for more effective dissolving!

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The mixed ingredients (the prepared ingredients before putting into the freezer) actually tasted like sour cream. I had to use a less than half a cup (roughly 1/4 to 3/8 of a cup) of coconut oil as I just ran out in preparing this.

I could add some honey or stevia to make this more like sweet cream butter!

I substituted used psyllium seed husk for the soy lecithin and in the place of the xanthan gum, I used 1 tbsp chia seed and 1 tsbp flax meal with 2 tbsp boiling water

Rating 
 
5.0
justin-goldberg Reviewed by justin-goldberg February 08, 2014
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This recipe is great.


The mixed ingredients (the prepared ingredients before putting into the freezer) actually tasted like sour cream. I had to use a less than half a cup (roughly 1/4 to 3/8 of a cup) of coconut oil as I just ran out in preparing this.

I could add some honey or stevia to make this more like sweet cream butter!

I substituted used psyllium seed husk for the soy lecithin and in the place of the xanthan gum, I used 1 tbsp chia seed and 1 tsbp flax meal with 2 tbsp boiling water

Owner's reply

Psyllium husks and chia seeds sound like a great Vegan Butter variation Justin. Thanks for sharing!

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Hi Mattie!

I tried out this recipe today for the first time, I'm new to vegan baking and I am so stoked that there is a way to make your own vegan butter!

It worked brilliantly, the only thing that went wrong was that the soya lecithin granules didn't dissolve completely when processing in the food processor, so I ended up with little yellow specs in my butter...

Am I doing something wrong? Is there something I could try to avoid that problem? I don't think I can get hold of liquid soya lecithin here in South Africa...

Thanks in advance and thanks again for your awesome recipes! :)

Robyn xxx
Rating 
 
4.0
Reviewed by Robyn February 03, 2014

Soya Lecithin Granules

Hi Mattie!

I tried out this recipe today for the first time, I'm new to vegan baking and I am so stoked that there is a way to make your own vegan butter!

It worked brilliantly, the only thing that went wrong was that the soya lecithin granules didn't dissolve completely when processing in the food processor, so I ended up with little yellow specs in my butter...

Am I doing something wrong? Is there something I could try to avoid that problem? I don't think I can get hold of liquid soya lecithin here in South Africa...

Thanks in advance and thanks again for your awesome recipes! :)

Robyn xxx

Owner's reply

Hi Robyn! The soy lecithin granule flecks has been an issue with some of the other commenters here as well. I've tried to recreate the problem but I haven't been able to because I believe the soy lecithin granules I use, which are Bob's Red Mill, dissolve more easily.

Please try increasing the time the mixture mixes in the food processor. I would imagine that after a few minutes of processing they should be well dissolved. If not, try heating the mixture in a saucepan until very warm, but not hot. Then try processing as normal until the soy lecithin granules are dissolved. Good luck!

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Hey Mattie
I was looking for a vegan palm-oil free margarine which cannot be found anywhere around here in Switzerland - and then I fell in love with your recipe.
As I was too lazy to get some xanthan I just tried it without this magical ingredient - and it woked so well already I'm now a frequent coconut-oil buyer in my shop around the corner.
So I think I should get a box full of the xanthanian wonder and go ahead in buttering =)
Thank you so much!
Do you think this can be used if something like melted butter is required, e.g. for cinnamon rolls?

Best from Switzerland!
Rating 
 
5.0
PeteTheBird Reviewed by PeteTheBird February 03, 2014
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I think I love you

Hey Mattie
I was looking for a vegan palm-oil free margarine which cannot be found anywhere around here in Switzerland - and then I fell in love with your recipe.
As I was too lazy to get some xanthan I just tried it without this magical ingredient - and it woked so well already I'm now a frequent coconut-oil buyer in my shop around the corner.
So I think I should get a box full of the xanthanian wonder and go ahead in buttering =)
Thank you so much!
Do you think this can be used if something like melted butter is required, e.g. for cinnamon rolls?

Best from Switzerland!

Owner's reply

So glad you like the Vegan Butter PeteTheBird! Yes, Vegan Butter is designed to be used almost exclusively as a drop-in replacement for traditional dairy butter in vegan baking applications. So it should work great in cinnamon rolls.

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I LOVE this recipe the only thing that would make it even better is to have all the ingredients in ounces or grams rather than cups and spoons, is this possible? Many thanks!!!
Rating 
 
5.0
Reviewed by Ayesha January 28, 2014

ingrediants in weight measurements?

I LOVE this recipe the only thing that would make it even better is to have all the ingredients in ounces or grams rather than cups and spoons, is this possible? Many thanks!!!

Owner's reply

I feel your pain Ayesha! I'm planning to add gram weight equivalents to my recipes in the future. The only problem is that its an extremely time-intensive project!

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Thanks so much for this; I am really looking forward to trying! And was just about to order the mold you suggest, but I am wondering how to measure for baking? Does the size of the cubes compare well to standard butter molds? Thanks so much!
lilly38 Reviewed by lilly38 January 18, 2014
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Excited to try!

Thanks so much for this; I am really looking forward to trying! And was just about to order the mold you suggest, but I am wondering how to measure for baking? Does the size of the cubes compare well to standard butter molds? Thanks so much!

Owner's reply

Great Vegan Butter questions lilly38! This recipe makes 1 cup, which is about 215 grams, which is equivalent to 2 sticks of butter. When recipes call for butter by volume, I'll melt the butter and measure it in measuring spoons or measuring cups. When recipes call for, say, an unmelted stick, I'll weigh half of the 215 grams, which is about 108 grams.

I recommend buying a scale if you don't have one already. Weighing will make sure you hit your mark every time and don't waste time or precious ingredients. Good luck!

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follow up comment on my previous question. i used soya lecethin granules which i bought from health store. i also found the xanthan gum in the same store. tried to do it again with all the ingredient posted above. but still oil and water separated every time i take it out from the fridge.
Reviewed by Don January 13, 2014

follow up comment on my previous question. i used soya lecethin granules which i bought from health store. i also found the xanthan gum in the same store. tried to do it again with all the ingredient posted above. but still oil and water separated every time i take it out from the fridge.

Owner's reply

Hi Don, don't forget to put the Vegan Butter in the freezer for solidification. Placing it in the refrigerator will cause the fats and water to separate before the whole thing gets a chance to solidify. It's extremely important that the mixture freezes as quickly as possible. Good luck!

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Just tried making this and it is fairly easy, but the end result for me was too much cider vinegar and not enough salt. Next time I'll try reducing the cider and a tiny bit more salt.

Question - I'd like to try making an Olive Oil spread - do you think substituting the sunflower oil for Extra Virgin Olive Oil would work?

Thanks!
jonesian Reviewed by jonesian January 09, 2014
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Just tried making this and it is fairly easy, but the end result for me was too much cider vinegar and not enough salt. Next time I'll try reducing the cider and a tiny bit more salt.

Question - I'd like to try making an Olive Oil spread - do you think substituting the sunflower oil for Extra Virgin Olive Oil would work?

Thanks!

Owner's reply

Hi jonesian, My taste isn't as sensitive to acid as other people's so I find the acid balance to be about right for me. Feel free to reduce it if it registers too strongly on your palate. Regarding the salt, this Vegan Butter is designed to be a replacement for traditional butter used for baking, hence the low salt. Adding more salt to this recipe would skew recipes with too much salt when used for a drop-in replacement for traditional dairy butter.

If you'd like something more suitable for non-baking applications, feel free to increase the salt to increase savoriness, and increase the liquid fat (canola oil, olive oil, etc) and decrease the coconut oil which will make it softer and more spreadable. You might want to try using 2 Tablespoons more liquid oil and 2 Tablespoons less coconut oil.

I'm actually going to start working on a dedicated soft, spreadable not-for-baking butter soon so stay tuned. Thanks for the feedback!

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Hello,
I have been searching and searching the shops and online for a vegan butter (and shortening) that doesn't contain palm oil, all the while getting more and more hopeless.

I want to bake cookies for animal rescue charities, but I just can't see how morally I can do it, unless all the ingredients in the cookies don't cause harm to animals. Palm oil does directly cause harm to animals. And there's my conundrum!

I've contacted all the major companies in the UK, and they all tell me the same thing. That the palm oil they use is RSPO certified. But the system seems to be flawed, and I don't think what's on offer is good enough.

So I was very happy to come across you recipes for vegan butter and shortening! :)

I've got a couple of questions though, hope you can answer!

1. I've got access to soy milk (6% soy beans, water, apple juice concentrate, and salt) but also soy cream (Water,Sunflower Oil (8.4%) ,Hulled Soya Beans (3.8%) ,Modified Tapioca Starch ,Fructose-Glucose Syrup ,Emulsifiers (Soya Lecithin, Sucrose Esters of Fatty Acids) ,Thickeners (Locust Bean Gum, Carrageenan) ,Flavouring ,Sea Salt ,Antioxidant (Tocopherol-Rich Extract)
Which do you think would yield a more buttery flavour?

2. I noticed you mentioned a few months ago that coconut vinegar gives a more buttery flavour, would you think it is worth purchasing for baking cookies (as it's quite expensive)?

3. Also bit of a silly one, would the fact that the butter/shortening has a short shelf life, effect the shelf life of the end product do you think? I want to make sure I can send the cookies out and not worry about them going moldy too quickly.

And finally. You should definitely start up a vegan butter/shortening company!!! I would be your first overseas customer! :D
Rating 
 
4.0
Reviewed by Laura January 07, 2014

So glad to have found this!

Hello,
I have been searching and searching the shops and online for a vegan butter (and shortening) that doesn't contain palm oil, all the while getting more and more hopeless.

I want to bake cookies for animal rescue charities, but I just can't see how morally I can do it, unless all the ingredients in the cookies don't cause harm to animals. Palm oil does directly cause harm to animals. And there's my conundrum!

I've contacted all the major companies in the UK, and they all tell me the same thing. That the palm oil they use is RSPO certified. But the system seems to be flawed, and I don't think what's on offer is good enough.

So I was very happy to come across you recipes for vegan butter and shortening! :)

I've got a couple of questions though, hope you can answer!

1. I've got access to soy milk (6% soy beans, water, apple juice concentrate, and salt) but also soy cream (Water,Sunflower Oil (8.4%) ,Hulled Soya Beans (3.8%) ,Modified Tapioca Starch ,Fructose-Glucose Syrup ,Emulsifiers (Soya Lecithin, Sucrose Esters of Fatty Acids) ,Thickeners (Locust Bean Gum, Carrageenan) ,Flavouring ,Sea Salt ,Antioxidant (Tocopherol-Rich Extract)
Which do you think would yield a more buttery flavour?

2. I noticed you mentioned a few months ago that coconut vinegar gives a more buttery flavour, would you think it is worth purchasing for baking cookies (as it's quite expensive)?

3. Also bit of a silly one, would the fact that the butter/shortening has a short shelf life, effect the shelf life of the end product do you think? I want to make sure I can send the cookies out and not worry about them going moldy too quickly.

And finally. You should definitely start up a vegan butter/shortening company!!! I would be your first overseas customer! :D

Owner's reply

Great Vegan Butter questions Laura! I understand your concern regarding wanting animal friendly ingredients. Here's hoping that coconut oil remains an animal safe ingredient! I'd think that the soy milk would result in tastier vegan butter than the soy cream due to it having more protein that can be denatured by the acid. But who knows! I recommend doing your own test by trying both and seeing which one yields tastier butter. The soy cream might have stuff hidden in that "Flavoring" designation that would make a tastier end product and lead to better butter.

Substituting half coconut vinegar for the apple cider vinegar does yield a slightly better flavor for me, but I don't think it would be worth the extra cost in vegan cookies, unless you were entering a baking competition or something;) Or, say if the coconut vinegar truck broke down near your house and you were able to get a few gallons for free.

The shorter shelf life of the Vegan Butter wouldn't be an issue in a baked product like a cookie because it has enough sugar to deactivate the microbes that cause mold, unless your cookies were ridiculously moist. Cookies usually dry out as they age instead of getting moldy.

I remember seeing someone on the internet a year or so ago marketing an artisanal vegan butter and I was so happy. I'm hoping someone takes it and runs with it! I think it's doable. I need to stay here and run this website though and hopefully come up with other tasty things to help vegan bakers. Good luck!

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I'm very excited to try this recipe! What type of coconut oil do you use?
DairyfreeBaker Reviewed by DairyfreeBaker January 03, 2014
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Coconut Oil

I'm very excited to try this recipe! What type of coconut oil do you use?

Owner's reply

Hi DairyfreeBaker! I usually use Spectrum or Cadia refined coconut oil in my Vegan Butters but so far, I haven't met a coconut oil I didn't like. Good luck!

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Looking forward to trying this.

Some ideas on the mold:
- Might try adding vitamin E to the oil.
- might try using a stainless steel butter enclosure (stainless kills bacteria)
- might spray or dip just the outside with a full-strength Vit C solution saturated with lecithin (so the solution will bond to the outside of the butter). This shouldn't affect the taste of each butter slice.
Rating 
 
5.0
davea0511 Reviewed by davea0511 December 18, 2013
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great article - about the moldy problem

Looking forward to trying this.

Some ideas on the mold:
- Might try adding vitamin E to the oil.
- might try using a stainless steel butter enclosure (stainless kills bacteria)
- might spray or dip just the outside with a full-strength Vit C solution saturated with lecithin (so the solution will bond to the outside of the butter). This shouldn't affect the taste of each butter slice.

Owner's reply

Thanks for the Vegan Butter mold issue ideas davea0511! I'll have to give them a shot. Right now I store my larger batches in the freezer and use one cube at a time in the refrigerator. Good to know that there's some other ideas. I was hoping that ascorbic acid would work in place of the acid but wow does that stuff taste sharply acidic. It's amazing how bluntly the acid jolts you on the tongue. No wonder microbes don't like it!

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Hi, Mattie, and thank you for your amazing vegan recipes. I want to make your Vegan Butter but would prefer using homemade soy milk due to GMO issues. Do you make your own or use packaged? I'm asking because packaged non-dairy milks usually contain xanthum gum or some other emulsifier. If you're using packaged and I'm using home made should I add extra xanthum gum or soy lecithin? Your advice is greatly appreciated.
Rating 
 
5.0
shireen Reviewed by shireen December 14, 2013
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Question

Hi, Mattie, and thank you for your amazing vegan recipes. I want to make your Vegan Butter but would prefer using homemade soy milk due to GMO issues. Do you make your own or use packaged? I'm asking because packaged non-dairy milks usually contain xanthum gum or some other emulsifier. If you're using packaged and I'm using home made should I add extra xanthum gum or soy lecithin? Your advice is greatly appreciated.

Owner's reply

Great question shireen! After switching to Edensoy Unsweetened soy milk a few years ago, I can't even think of going back to other brands laced with things like carrageenan, sugar, "natural flavoring" and other weird stuff. I'll just have soy beans and water thanks. I've also been making my own soy milk lately and use it in Vegan Butter often.

I do all of my recipe development with Edensoy Unsweetened but I make sure that when I call for "soy milk" any type of soy milk can be used. The key here is to use soy milk because it contains proteins that denature from the acids, allowing for extra tasty, buttery flavors to be generated. More protein = more denaturing = more buttery goodness. So the short answer is, yes, your Vegan Butter will be even awesomerer with homemade soy milk!

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Made so far the non-refined version and the banana butter. OMFG so good...recently learned that I have a low tolerance for lactose but love me some butter. I used unsweetened Almond milk in my recipe and worked fine.

Question about baking - is it a 1-1 swap for regular butter?

Seriously - so flipping good!
Rating 
 
5.0
Flanzo Reviewed by Flanzo December 12, 2013
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Wow - Amazing

Made so far the non-refined version and the banana butter. OMFG so good...recently learned that I have a low tolerance for lactose but love me some butter. I used unsweetened Almond milk in my recipe and worked fine.

Question about baking - is it a 1-1 swap for regular butter?

Seriously - so flipping good!

Owner's reply

So glad you like the Vegan Butter Flanzo! Yes, all of the Vegan Butters on Veganbaking.net are a 1 to 1 swap with regular butter. The water-to-fat ratios are the same. I make croissants with it regularly. I'm developing a spreadable Vegan Butter which will be posted soon. It's not going to be a 1 to 1 swap for butter; it'll be similar to Earth Balance spread for spreading on things like muffins, toast and pancakes.

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hi, tried doing it with refined coconut edible oil, but oil and soy milk keeps on separating every time i let it out of the fridge
Reviewed by Don P December 11, 2013

hi, tried doing it with refined coconut edible oil, but oil and soy milk keeps on separating every time i let it out of the fridge

Owner's reply

Hi Don, did you use lecithin and process all ingredients in a food processor? If you do that and let it solidify immediately in the freezer, the water and fat shouldn't separate.

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Thanks for the recipe! I've been trying to stray away from things like Earth Balance because of the palm oil scenario and this gives me hope. Would I be able to use unrefined coconut oil instead of refined? Or would it give the butter too much of a coconut-y taste?
Reviewed by Jason December 08, 2013

Thanks for the recipe! I've been trying to stray away from things like Earth Balance because of the palm oil scenario and this gives me hope. Would I be able to use unrefined coconut oil instead of refined? Or would it give the butter too much of a coconut-y taste?

Owner's reply

Hi Jason,

I have a version called Coconut Vegan Butter on Veganbaking.net which is designed to use unrefined coconut oil. The recipe is also designed to highlight coconut flavors. You could also just make this version and add unrefined oil and it'll still work and taste good with a little coconut flavor. Both oils are structurally the same.

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Thanks so much for posting this recipe. It's easy and a great alternative to Earth Balance which still uses palm oil. I find that when I store the cubes in the fridge (after they've been frozen) they appear to look moldy within a few weeks. What's been your experience with how long this will stay good in the fridge?
Dena Reviewed by Dena November 29, 2013
Last updated: November 29, 2013
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How long will this stay good in fridge

Thanks so much for posting this recipe. It's easy and a great alternative to Earth Balance which still uses palm oil. I find that when I store the cubes in the fridge (after they've been frozen) they appear to look moldy within a few weeks. What's been your experience with how long this will stay good in the fridge?

Owner's reply

Hi Dena! I have the same issues with the relatively short shelf life. I've tried adding ascorbic acid as part of the acid component and while it does increase shelf life, it adds a harsh, sharp acid profile that's not acceptable. This is still something I'd like to figure out some day. If you find a way to make Vegan Butter last longer please let me know!

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Thank you for posting this recipe. I learned a great deal from your fats article mattie. I have made this recipe a few times the buttery taste is so close to dairy butter. This is perfect for my pie crust. I used the regular butter for my first attempt at croissant making, I will be making the European style butter next.
Rating 
 
5.0
Trickmonet Reviewed by Trickmonet November 27, 2013
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versatile and tasty

Thank you for posting this recipe. I learned a great deal from your fats article mattie. I have made this recipe a few times the buttery taste is so close to dairy butter. This is perfect for my pie crust. I used the regular butter for my first attempt at croissant making, I will be making the European style butter next.

vegan butter 2 tbs cubes
Owner's reply

That's a great picture of your Vegan Butter Trickmonet! I also saw a picture of your croissants which looked amazing. Thanks for sharing!

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Thank you for applying your chemistry inclined mind to vegan recipes!!!
A couple things, just to preface, I sub'd the xanthan gum for guar gum as I am sticking with all organic ingredients.
-That being said, I've made two batches now and both have filled up a little over three squares in the Tovolo ice tray, is that about right?
-I noticed when I was heating the butter on medium high heat that it started to brown and solidify a bit... is that normal?
-I'm making it primarily to use on my cupcakes and although the flavor is great, after creating my frosting I can still smell the vinegar, not taste, only smell. It's bothersome and I'm wondering if you've tried the recipe with the lemon, salt and agar agar instead?
Thanks so much again!

Rating 
 
5.0
RunicBaked Reviewed by RunicBaked November 19, 2013
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Cupcake frosting?

Thank you for applying your chemistry inclined mind to vegan recipes!!!
A couple things, just to preface, I sub'd the xanthan gum for guar gum as I am sticking with all organic ingredients.
-That being said, I've made two batches now and both have filled up a little over three squares in the Tovolo ice tray, is that about right?
-I noticed when I was heating the butter on medium high heat that it started to brown and solidify a bit... is that normal?
-I'm making it primarily to use on my cupcakes and although the flavor is great, after creating my frosting I can still smell the vinegar, not taste, only smell. It's bothersome and I'm wondering if you've tried the recipe with the lemon, salt and agar agar instead?
Thanks so much again!

Owner's reply

Thanks RunicBaked! I usually use the Tovolo ice cube tray that makes the large cubes (that's linked in this recipe). I usually fill up two cubes worth and sometimes have a little left over. If you're using Tovolo's smaller size cube tray, it makes sense that you'd probably be making three smaller cubes.

Vegan Butter may brown and solidify slightly if exposed to medium-high heat for a bit over time, but in the recipe I call for the coconut oil to be heated to just the melting point. This is so things can solidify as fast as possible resulting in smaller ice crystals once it goes to the freezer. Traditional dairy butter browns when exposed to heat also. I'm planning on making a Brown Vegan Butter recipe soon so there's a vegan option for that.

Sensitivities to vinegar vary. I must not be that sensitive to it because I love it and tend to use it liberally; I have a carousel in my pantry for just assorted vinegars! Some people find the acidity/vinegar level of this Vegan Butter to be too much. Feel free to reduce it to your liking. Also keep in mind that when Vegan Butter is heated, you're going to notice the vinegar notes more due to more volatile vinegar compounds getting into the surrounding air and being sensed by your sense of smell. When you're eating Vegan Butter in normal conditions, this should't be the case. Also, as I mentioned in another comment, lately I've found that 1/2 teaspoon apple cider vinegar and 1/2 teaspoon coconut vinegar results in better butter flavor with less of the vinegar "funk". I'll probably be updating all Vegan Butter recipes to reflect this after a little more testing. Good luck!

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I tired this recipe for the first time today using coconut milk and sunflower lecithin and my hand held immersion blender and I am very happy with the results! Thank you for working on and sharing this recipe. I am going to play a little with reducing the salt and vinegar, trying other acids and maybe increasing the gum or mixing with coco butter but still very happy with the initial results. I was a vegan for 8 years but became soy and gluten intolerant in 2009 and went back to eating meat, eggs and dairy. I feel my health has suffered and am slowly going back to a vegan/vegetarian hybrid of something, lol. And I have been baking from scratch for almost 50 years and have to re-learn and try new gluten -free recipes. I have friends that have food allergies so I have been working on vegan baking, this is perfect! Thanks again
Rating 
 
4.0
VegasBev Reviewed by VegasBev November 16, 2013
Last updated: November 16, 2013
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Very Happy With My First Attempt!!

I tired this recipe for the first time today using coconut milk and sunflower lecithin and my hand held immersion blender and I am very happy with the results! Thank you for working on and sharing this recipe. I am going to play a little with reducing the salt and vinegar, trying other acids and maybe increasing the gum or mixing with coco butter but still very happy with the initial results. I was a vegan for 8 years but became soy and gluten intolerant in 2009 and went back to eating meat, eggs and dairy. I feel my health has suffered and am slowly going back to a vegan/vegetarian hybrid of something, lol. And I have been baking from scratch for almost 50 years and have to re-learn and try new gluten -free recipes. I have friends that have food allergies so I have been working on vegan baking, this is perfect! Thanks again

Owner's reply

So glad the Vegan Butter worked out VegasBev! Cheers to being open minded and figuring out what works for you. I've done some tests with vinegars and found that using 1/2 teaspoon apple cider vinegar and 1/2 teaspoon coconut vinegar produces even better flavor. I'm probably going to update all of my Vegan Butter recipes to reflect this after I do a little more testing. I also have soy-free Vegan Butters here if you do a search in the upper right-hand-corner of this page.

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