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Vegan Chia Seed Egg Replacer Mattie

Written by Mattie    
 
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Vegan Chia Seed Egg Replacer

Some of us may remember chia seeds from those ch-ch-chia pet commercials in the 80's. Well they're back! It turns out that ch-ch-chia can b-b-bind. They work similarly to flax seeds in that when ground, the mixture forms a mucilage, also known as goop, and pulls together when heated. Perfect as an egg replacer in things like vegan cakescookies or anywhere else you'd want to substitute an egg. Like flax seeds they also contain protein, fiber and are an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids.

Just be sure to use white chia seeds. The darker varieties will be visible in your finished product. White chia seeds can be found online if they're not available at your local health food store.

Find more Healthy recipes on Veganbaking.net

Vegan Chia Seed Egg Replacer Recipe

This recipe makes the equivalent of 1 egg.

3 Tablespoons water
1 Tablespoon white chia seed meal

1) Grind the chia seeds

Grind the chia seeds into a meal in a blender or spice grinder. You may want to grind a larger amount and store it for future use. Like flax oil, chia seeds are extremely perishable so if you grind a larger amount for later use, store it in an air-tight container in the freezer for up to one year. 1 cup of chia seeds equals about 1 1/3 cup of flax meal. 

2) Mix in the water and allow the chia mucilage to form

Add the water to a small bowl or cup. Add the chia seed meal and mix together with a whisk or fork. Let the mixture sit for 5 to 10 minutes so it develops a goopy texture similar to a raw egg. Warm water will speed up the mucilage forming process. This recipe makes 1 Vegan Chia Seed Egg Replacer.


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Is it 1 tablespoon of Chia seeds or Chia meal? If Chia meal, does one tablespoon seeds = 1 tablespoon meal?
Rating 
 
5.0
Reviewed by Marc Sirabella May 18, 2014

Seed or Meal?

Is it 1 tablespoon of Chia seeds or Chia meal? If Chia meal, does one tablespoon seeds = 1 tablespoon meal?

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I've been using chia seeds in my baking/cooking for a few years now. I make chia gel all the time. My daughter loves it in her green tea. I have never had to grind my chia seeds--ever! Unlike flax seeds, chia seeds don't need to be ground to be used in recipes, including making egg replacement. We are GF in our house so we use a lot of eggs and chia gel is often used, along with flax, to make egg replacements. :)
Rating 
 
3.0
SChapman Reviewed by SChapman January 20, 2014
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (1)

No grinding necessary!

I've been using chia seeds in my baking/cooking for a few years now. I make chia gel all the time. My daughter loves it in her green tea. I have never had to grind my chia seeds--ever! Unlike flax seeds, chia seeds don't need to be ground to be used in recipes, including making egg replacement. We are GF in our house so we use a lot of eggs and chia gel is often used, along with flax, to make egg replacements. :)

Owner's reply

Great idea on not grinding the chia seeds SChapman! I love the texture that whole chia seeds gives cookies. Thanks for sharing!

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Dry ground or whole chia (or flax, psyllium, etc) mixes with other dry ingredients evenly and quickly using a spoon. Pre soaking requires a power mixer for lump free results, just like conventional baking with eggs and dairy. I grind as I go, using a cheap Woolworths coffee grinder for only a few seconds. Black and white seeds when ground together give a wholemeal flour appearance. The results are much superior to conventional baking: a delicious taste and great mouthfeel with a moist but not soggy crumb tasting fresh for several days.
Reviewed by Maria Sobolewski November 06, 2013

Mixed dry is preferred method unless using power m

Dry ground or whole chia (or flax, psyllium, etc) mixes with other dry ingredients evenly and quickly using a spoon. Pre soaking requires a power mixer for lump free results, just like conventional baking with eggs and dairy. I grind as I go, using a cheap Woolworths coffee grinder for only a few seconds. Black and white seeds when ground together give a wholemeal flour appearance. The results are much superior to conventional baking: a delicious taste and great mouthfeel with a moist but not soggy crumb tasting fresh for several days.

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I had an idea about your latkes...what if you ground up dry chia seeds in a flax grinder, mixed the POWDER with your flour, and then add enough liquid to the whole thing to make the right consistency? I just used this method when making vegan pancakes this morning. I saw on this post that chia seeds make a good egg substitute, but I didn't bother to premix the chia with water, and I figured that it would mix better into the pancake mix if it were dry, and would do it's 'thing' later, when the liquid mixed with the whole batch. The pancakes turned out excellently. It doesn't matter if you premix the chia with water, they will still bind your product together, interspersed throughout the batter.
Rating 
 
4.0
Reviewed by Reesh July 13, 2013

Answer to Mike's Latkes

I had an idea about your latkes...what if you ground up dry chia seeds in a flax grinder, mixed the POWDER with your flour, and then add enough liquid to the whole thing to make the right consistency? I just used this method when making vegan pancakes this morning. I saw on this post that chia seeds make a good egg substitute, but I didn't bother to premix the chia with water, and I figured that it would mix better into the pancake mix if it were dry, and would do it's 'thing' later, when the liquid mixed with the whole batch. The pancakes turned out excellently. It doesn't matter if you premix the chia with water, they will still bind your product together, interspersed throughout the batter.

Owner's reply

Thanks for your input Reesh! I recently had cookies in a vegan restaurant in San Antonio, TX where they used what appeared to be whole chia seeds and you're right- the cookies appeared to still be bound by the chia seeds. It appears that, unlike flax seeds, when chia seeds are soaked in water, their polysaccharides are able to travel outside of the hull which allows binding to still take place. I can't wait to investigate this further. Thanks for sharing!

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Hi, I have an important answer for the person who failed to make her buckwheat flour latkes!

I just saw this today on a cooking show when they were making a rue...you must add the flour to the eggs or egg replacer not the other way around!

I think that is the right answer. Good luck, hope you get this.

Reviewed by Diane February 16, 2013

Answer to Reviewed by Mike December 11, 2012 Prob

Hi, I have an important answer for the person who failed to make her buckwheat flour latkes!

I just saw this today on a cooking show when they were making a rue...you must add the flour to the eggs or egg replacer not the other way around!

I think that is the right answer. Good luck, hope you get this.

Was this review helpful to you? 
I love chia seeds!! They are also a delicious topping for pretty much anything, and after soaking in apple juice for a while you get a tasty treat!

I've never used white chia seeds, and gave up on the idea of grinding whole seeds up very quickly. I usually use a smallish amount of VERY hot water, which also gives me the freedom to add more liquid if I need to. The "goopiness" of chia is definitely unique.

One thing I'll mention - I don't know if it was due to use of chia-egg, but my last adventure with chia resulted in some amazingly fluffy waffles that also browned extremely quickly. Not sure if that was the chia or some other factor?

Have fun chia-ing.
Rating 
 
4.0
Reviewed by joanna December 27, 2012

I love chia seeds!! They are also a delicious topping for pretty much anything, and after soaking in apple juice for a while you get a tasty treat!

I've never used white chia seeds, and gave up on the idea of grinding whole seeds up very quickly. I usually use a smallish amount of VERY hot water, which also gives me the freedom to add more liquid if I need to. The "goopiness" of chia is definitely unique.

One thing I'll mention - I don't know if it was due to use of chia-egg, but my last adventure with chia resulted in some amazingly fluffy waffles that also browned extremely quickly. Not sure if that was the chia or some other factor?

Have fun chia-ing.

Was this review helpful to you? 
HI there,

I tried this last night when making buckwheat flour latkes, and it was something of a disaster. First, let me say that the latke recipe is basically flour, a little baking soda and salt, and grated onions. The latke recipe called for adding to eggs to the flour, baking soda, and salt, mixing that up, and then stirring in the onions.

When I added the chia goop to the flour mix and tried to whisk it all together, I ended up with a small clump of flour and chia goop in the larger bowl of flour. I ended up tossing it and using Ener-G egg replacer, my usual.

So, any suggestions on what I might have done wrong? Did I let the chia goop get to gel-ly?

Thanks.
Reviewed by Mike December 11, 2012

Problem using this recipe

HI there,

I tried this last night when making buckwheat flour latkes, and it was something of a disaster. First, let me say that the latke recipe is basically flour, a little baking soda and salt, and grated onions. The latke recipe called for adding to eggs to the flour, baking soda, and salt, mixing that up, and then stirring in the onions.

When I added the chia goop to the flour mix and tried to whisk it all together, I ended up with a small clump of flour and chia goop in the larger bowl of flour. I ended up tossing it and using Ener-G egg replacer, my usual.

So, any suggestions on what I might have done wrong? Did I let the chia goop get to gel-ly?

Thanks.

Was this review helpful to you? 
Definitely want to try this! Just wondering from your experience, do you prefer chia or flax in baking recipes (like a white cake for example)? I've read that chia doesn't impart as noticeable a flavor as flax but it also seems to be a lot more expensive. Is it worth it for those times when you really want to 'impress'?
Rating 
 
5.0
Reviewed by Frank February 01, 2012

flax vs. chia--preferred replacer?

Definitely want to try this! Just wondering from your experience, do you prefer chia or flax in baking recipes (like a white cake for example)? I've read that chia doesn't impart as noticeable a flavor as flax but it also seems to be a lot more expensive. Is it worth it for those times when you really want to 'impress'?

Owner's reply

Hi Frank,

You're right- chia seeds not only aren't visible in the baked item if you use white ones, they also are virtually tasteless if kept fresh. Originally I didn't think I'd be using chia seeds much when I found out about them. But now, after I've used up all my flax I'm going to grind my own white chia seeds and keep them in the freezer instead of the flax. They're more expensive but they last so long and it's still a bargain compared to eggs. Good luck!

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I just tried this for a cookie recipe. Best egg substitute I've ever used.
Rating 
 
5.0
Reviewed by Emily Taylor November 10, 2011

I just tried this for a cookie recipe. Best egg substitute I've ever used.

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I read on the net chia seeds are higher in trytophan than turkey so if it makes you sleepy you will know why! ;)
Rating 
 
5.0
Reviewed by Francheska June 01, 2011

Chia have tryptophan

I read on the net chia seeds are higher in trytophan than turkey so if it makes you sleepy you will know why! ;)

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Is it 3T water to 1 T chia or to 1 teaspoon chia? I've seen contradicting reports on the Web.
Thanks!
Reviewed by Kamilah February 01, 2011

Egg replacer measurements

Is it 3T water to 1 T chia or to 1 teaspoon chia? I've seen contradicting reports on the Web.
Thanks!

Owner's reply

Good eye Kamilah! I just updated the recipe to call for 1 Tablespoon white chia seeds instead of 1 teaspoon. Thanks!

Was this review helpful to you? 
I only have black seeds, but will give it a try. I'd read that they made a good egg replacer but didn't quite know how to make that happen, so thanks! Regarding the person who commented that the seeds go rancid quickly, I've found the exact opposite to be true, both dry and "gelled" in the fridge. So if you're on the fence about trying chi-chi-chia, give it a try!
Rating 
 
5.0
Reviewed by Anna September 23, 2010

Another use for Chia!

I only have black seeds, but will give it a try. I'd read that they made a good egg replacer but didn't quite know how to make that happen, so thanks! Regarding the person who commented that the seeds go rancid quickly, I've found the exact opposite to be true, both dry and "gelled" in the fridge. So if you're on the fence about trying chi-chi-chia, give it a try!

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Actually, I use the black chia seeds all the time in baking. Unless you are baking a white cake they don't show up too obviously. I have never ground them nor do I whisk them. I just pour in the water and give a quick stir with whatever I have handy. I believe they go rancid and lose nutrition quite quick if you leave them ground for too long (more than a couple days). But chia is a great source of nutrients and should be used in a daily diet, vegan or not!
Rating 
 
3.0
Reviewed by Christina September 07, 2010

Actually...

Actually, I use the black chia seeds all the time in baking. Unless you are baking a white cake they don't show up too obviously. I have never ground them nor do I whisk them. I just pour in the water and give a quick stir with whatever I have handy. I believe they go rancid and lose nutrition quite quick if you leave them ground for too long (more than a couple days). But chia is a great source of nutrients and should be used in a daily diet, vegan or not!

Owner's reply

That's interesting that you've had good results without grinding them Christina. I'll have to experiment with that. I have found flax and chia seeds tend to go rancid after being stored at room temperature. I've been storing them in the refrigerator which has been keeping them good for up to 6 months. I just started storing them in the freezer which should theoretically extend their storage abilities past a year and I've had no adverse binding effects with them stored in this way.

I'm going to update this recipe as well as the Golden Flax Seed recipe shortly to reflect the benefits of storing them in the freezer.

Thanks for your input!

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I recently bought my first batch on chia seeds. I found them at the local farmer's market. A Mennonite (Christian Anabaptist) family of 8 sells them and runs their own local baking company. Very interesting family.

Also, they claim that chia seeds do not lose their nutrients during cooking. Cross your fingers.

I am excited to start using them many different recipes!
Rating 
 
5.0
tia Reviewed by tia November 22, 2009
Top 50 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (3)

T-T-Tia

I recently bought my first batch on chia seeds. I found them at the local farmer's market. A Mennonite (Christian Anabaptist) family of 8 sells them and runs their own local baking company. Very interesting family.

Also, they claim that chia seeds do not lose their nutrients during cooking. Cross your fingers.

I am excited to start using them many different recipes!

Was this review helpful to you?