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Coconut Vegan Butter Mattie

Written by Mattie    
 
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Coconut Vegan Butter Recipe

Coconut Vegan Butter is similar to Vegan Butter but involves unrefined coconut oil and agave syrup to accentuate the coconut flavors. The result is a spread that celebrates the richness and smoothness that only coconut can offer. Since this Vegan Butter is slightly more sweet than a regular vegan butter, it's recommended to add another layer of complexity to things like pancakes, toast or a baked item where coconut would enhance flavor. Also use this to make things like coconut pie crust or coconut lime scones. 

Vegan Butter is designed to mimic real butter in vegan baking applications. Like real butter, Vegan Butter is more solid than tub margarine and not as spreadable. This is so it can perform optimally in vegan baking applications. If your goal is to have a conveniently softer, spreadable Vegan Butter, swap out 1 Tablespoon of the coconut oil with 1 additional Tablespoon canola, safflower or sunflower oil.

Learn more about the food science behind Vegan Butter.

Coconut Vegan Butter Recipe

3 Tablespoons + 1 teaspoon soy milk
1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
¼ + 1/8 teaspoon salt

½ cup + 2 Tablespoons + 1 teaspoon unrefined coconut oil, melted
1 Tablespoon canola oil, safflower oil or sunflower oil

4 teaspoons amber agave syrup
1 teaspoon liquid soy lecithin -or- liquid sunflower lecithin -or- 2 ¼ teaspoons  soy lecithin granules
¼ teaspoon xanthan gum

1) Curdle the soy milk

Place the soy milk, apple cider vinegar and salt in a small cup and whisk together with a fork. Let it sit for about 10 minutes so the mixture curdles.

2) Mix the Vegan Butter ingredients

Melt the coconut oil in a microwave so it's barely melted and as close to room temperature as possible. Measure it and add it and the canola oil to a food processor. Making smooth vegan butter is dependent on the mixture solidifying as quickly as possible after it's mixed. This is why it's important to make sure your coconut oil is as close to room temperature as possible before you mix it with the rest of the ingredients.

3) Transfer the Vegan Butter to a mold so it solidifies

Add the soy milk mixture, soy lecithin and xanthan gum to the food processor. Process for 2 minutes, scraping down the sides halfway through the duration. Pour the mixture into a mold and place it in the freezer to solidify. An ice cube mold works well. The vegan butter should be ready to use in about an hour. Store it in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 month or wrapped in plastic wrap in the freezer for up to 1 year. This recipe makes 1 cup (215 grams), or the equivalent of 2 sticks Coconut Vegan Butter.

For more vegan butter recipes check out the Vegan Butter section.


Get a price on the Liquid Soy Lecithin I Recommend at Amazon.




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I am dying to try this out but really don't want to use xanthan gum for so many reasons... I've read that you can sub it for guar gum or a mixture of guar gum + locust bean gum... I've not used either of these ingredients and am wondering if you have any input as I understand the pivotal role the xanthan gum is playing here.

Thank you for being so passionate and creative!
RunicBaked Reviewed by RunicBaked October 29, 2013
Top 50 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (2)

Guar Gum?

I am dying to try this out but really don't want to use xanthan gum for so many reasons... I've read that you can sub it for guar gum or a mixture of guar gum + locust bean gum... I've not used either of these ingredients and am wondering if you have any input as I understand the pivotal role the xanthan gum is playing here.

Thank you for being so passionate and creative!

Owner's reply

Hi RunicBaked! Guar gum should work as a substitute for xanthan gum in Vegan Butter to a degree. I've found that to get the same results, you should aim to add a little more than double the guar gum. That would be about 1/2 + 1/8 teaspoons guar gum for this recipe (I don't have my scale handy at the moment so I don't know what that is in grams). Xanthan gum is a little more effective at trapping air bubbles and emulsifying, but using guar gum should still work well enough.

I don't recommend the hassle of tracking down the locust bean gum for this particular application. We're just taking advantage of a very small amount of emulsification, air bubble trapping and thickening properties. Good luck!

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Can sunflower lecithin granules be used or can only liquid sunflower lecithin be used for any of your "butters"?
Reviewed by Jody Foote August 08, 2013

Can sunflower lecithin granules be used or can only liquid sunflower lecithin be used for any of your "butters"?

Owner's reply

Hi Jody! They make sunflower lecithin granules? Cool! I didn't know they were making that stuff now. They should definitely work in the Vegan Butters, but you may want to add some extra time whisking or food processing (depending on the recipe) to get the granules to dissolve properly. Good luck!

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Would this recipe have the same result if I substituted coconut milk for the soy milk? Should I use the whole fat canned coconut milk or could I use the coconut milk in the tetra cartons? Thanks for your help. I am excited to try this in my Vitamix!
jsmith Reviewed by jsmith June 10, 2013
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (1)

Substitute Coconut Milk

Would this recipe have the same result if I substituted coconut milk for the soy milk? Should I use the whole fat canned coconut milk or could I use the coconut milk in the tetra cartons? Thanks for your help. I am excited to try this in my Vitamix!

Owner's reply

Hi jsmith! Coconut Vegan Butter would have a slightly different taste if it was made with coconut milk. This is because the acid in the recipe curdles the protein in the soy milk and produces butter flavors (probably diacetyl, among others) as part of a chemical reaction. Since coconut milk contains only a miniscule amount of protein, these flavors would not be produced and the flavor is less buttery.

If you still want to make a truly soy-free vegan butter and a lack of buttery flavor isn't a concern, I'd recommend using light coconut milk from the can, shaken at room temperature before using to make sure it's mixed before you measure it. I find the coconut milks that come in the cartons to basically be "white water" and usually don't offer anything significant to flavor, texture or anything else. You should be able to do a one-to-one substitution of light coconut milk for soy milk. Good luck and let me know how it turns out!

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So, the description of this recipe says it uses slightly more agave syrup than the regular butter . .. but there is no agave syrup in the original OR in this recipe. Am i the only one confused?
Reviewed by cara November 21, 2012

agave?

So, the description of this recipe says it uses slightly more agave syrup than the regular butter . .. but there is no agave syrup in the original OR in this recipe. Am i the only one confused?

Owner's reply

Thanks for letting me know about this Cara! I've updated the recipe to not reference the original Vegan Butter recipe because it doesn't contain agave syrup. However, Coconut Vegan Butter does contain amber agave syrup in the ingredients list.

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