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Daniel-san
Daniel-san
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Hi all,

I cannot easily find good quality vegan margarine in my city and I kind of have to use oil to replace margarine (or butter). A professional baker (non-vegan) told me once that the trick is to use 2/3 of oil to replace a quantity of butter or margarine and until now it always turns out fine.


But I am just wondering about the taste, can we really find a difference between same recipe : one made with margarine, the other made with oil?
Is there really a difference in the taste?
I guess it might also depend on what we are talking about (something like a sugar cookie might need good tasty margarine, maybe not a chocolate cake)...


If anyone's got something to share about that. :)
Wednesday, May 12 2010, 05:59 AM
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Accepted Answer

Mattie
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Friday, May 14 2010, 08:12 PM - #Permalink
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Hi Daniel-san,

Welcome to the forums! The 2/3 oil to 1 cup butter or margarine rule is because butter and to a lesser extent, margarine incorporates small amounts of water and even smaller amounts of air. Oil is 100 percent fat in comparison.

Butter and margarine definitely enhances the flavor complexity of your baked item due to it's butter flavor compounds. This is almost a sort of 'umami' which is the Japanese idea of savory, arguably the 5th flavor sense. When I design a recipe I usually prefer to use oil unless the recipe significantly benefits from the flavors of butter. Recipes containing corn, pumpkin, or other savory/sweet elements tend to work out better with margarine's buttery flavors.

Also, it's impossible to make flaky pie crust and puff pastry with oil. This is because these things rely heavily on solid fat both isolating the gluten in the flour by coating it (instead of being absorbed) and the solid fats creating several altering layers that get crispy during baking and allow for leavening caused by these layers expanding.

Hope this clarifies things a little!

Someday I'd love to make a blend of margarine from coconut oil and cocoa butter and some other stuff and see what I can come up with.
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  • Accepted Answer

    Daniel-san
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    Thursday, May 20 2010, 07:36 AM - #Permalink
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    Very interesting, thanks for all those infos!

    And at least it will keep me away from trying again cinnamon rolls with oil (turned out completely flat, hopefully it tasted good) :blush:
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    Mattie
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    Saturday, February 11 2012, 11:25 AM - #Permalink
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    I eventually figured out how to make Vegan Butter! It works really well as a drop-in replacement for butter and other margarines because it has the same water to fat ratio as butter. If you don't know about it already, here's the link:
    http://veganbaking.net/other-vegan-treats/735-vegan-butter
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    DebLin
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    Friday, December 06 2013, 06:29 AM - #Permalink
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    When you say to use 2/3 oil in place of butter or margarine. Does this mean the liquid oil or are you speaking about solid oil like coconut oil? I am wanting to make the vegan scones but I don't have any vegan butter and can't run out to get any (to far away).

    Thanks for your help.
    Deb
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    Mattie
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    Friday, December 06 2013, 07:58 AM - #Permalink
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    Hi Deb!

    Scones have a short dough which means that it needs lots of solid fats to ensure the gluten doesn't bind and make it chewy. That's how scones get their awesome tender texture. Since solid fats are needed, you'll want to get your hands on coconut oil, margarine or Vegan Butter if you want to make scones with those qualities.

    If you don't have any solid fats, I'd recommend making muffins :D Good luck!
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    DebLin
    DebLin
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    Friday, December 06 2013, 08:16 AM - #Permalink
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    Mattie
    Thanks for responding to quickly. I did try the scones using solid coconut oil. They were a little dry. The texture didn't look like your picture. More like the scones were about to crumble. If that makes any sense. They were still VERY delicious!!!

    Thanks for the recipes on here. I hope someone else has developed a website for meals that is as well maintained and gives such GREAT instruction as this one does. If someone knows of a good website for vegan meals, please let me know. I have only been a vegan for about 6 months now. Getting tired of the same recipes I began with. Thanks again!!!! Deb
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