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Vegan White Chocolate Mattie

Written by Mattie    
 
5.0 (7)
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Vegan White Chocolate

Commercial vegan white chocolate is relatively difficult to find but is an extremely versatile ingredient to have in your kitchen. Luckily, white chocolate's main ingredient, cocoa butter, is easy to find at affordable prices on the internet if you can't find it at your local health food store. A touch of soy milk powder and vanilla extract enhances depth of flavor in this chocolate. 

Earlier attempts at making this Vegan White Chocolate recipe have resulted in excessively grainy bars due to the absence of industrial chocolate making equipment. A few extra steps will ensure this bar is as smooth as possible. Grinding your soy milk powder in a rotary coffee grinder will make the powder granules as small as possible and cause them to not be as noticeable on the palate. Tempering the chocolate to ensure proper fat crystal formation is the other crucial step to ensuring a smooth, high quality bar. Once you've mastered these steps you can add flavorings like cardamom, matcha, cinnamon and ginger powder for a truly outstanding vegan white chocolate.

Find more White Chocolate recipes on Veganbaking.net

Vegan White Chocolate Recipe

1 teaspoon soy milk powder

¼ cup + 1 Tablespoon confectioners sugar
pinch of salt

2.1 ounces (1/3 cup) cocoa butter

½ teaspoon vanilla extract, alcohol-based

1) Grind the soy milk powder then sift it with the confectioners sugar

To ensure your chocolate is as smooth as possible, run the soy milk powder through a rotary coffee grinder. Sift the soy milk powder, confectioners sugar and salt into a medium mixing bowl and set aside. 

2) Whisk together the cocoa butter, soy milk powder, sugar and vanilla

Add the cocoa butter to a small saucepan and melt over medium heat. Alternatively, the cocoa butter can be melted in the microwave. Transfer the mixture to a double boiler and whisk until smooth. Whisk in the soy milk powder, confectioners sugar and salt mixture followed by the vanilla extract. Continue whisking until smooth.

3) Temper the chocolate

This process is critical when making chocolate that has a smooth mouthfeel and has that snap when you break a piece of it off. If you're not going to temper than you shouldn't make chocolate because the grainy texture won't make it worth the effort. Tempering is really easy with a double boiler and a good thermometer. Once you grasp the theory it becomes even easier. 

Tempering is all about encouraging the fat to solidify, also known as crystallize, a specific way that results in dense, not too jagged crystals that pack together tightly. The result is chocolate that is dense, smooth and breaks with a snap. Tempered chocolate is also more resistant to bloom which is when fat crystallizes on the surface of the chocolate that resembles white dust.

There are 6 known fat crystal types in cocoa butter: Forms I, II, III, IV, V and VI. In tempering, the specific desired type of crystals, known as Form V crystals, melt at a temperature of 90F (32C) for dark chocolate and about 87F (31C) for white chocolate. We encourage, or seed these tiny crystals into our chocolate by first melting all other undesirable forms that melt at other temperatures. The crystal forms that melt at lower temperatures than Form V are Form I through Form IV and the crystal form that melts above Form V is Form VI. Bringing the mixture to a temperature of 120F (49C) melts all Forms. Think of this step as hitting the reset button on your chocolate so now you have a clean slate as far as the fat crystals are concerned. Now you need to bring the chocolate down to a low temperature so all of the fat Form types have been initiated. Bringing the temperature down to about 79F (26C) ensures this. We then increase the temperature until the Form V crystals have been melted which is 87F (31C) before pouring the chocolate. After the chocolate is poured into the mold it's important to let it sit at room temperature and not immediately be placed in the refrigerator. This ensures the Form V crystals have time to develop.

In summary: bring the mixture up to 120F (49C) while whisking frequently. Remove the bowl containing the mixture from the double boiler. Place the mixture in the refrigerator periodically and whisk occasionally to allow the mixture to reduce to 79F (26C). Now place the mixture back on the double boiler and bring it up to 87F (31C). If you overshoot and the temperature goes past 89F (32C), start the tempering process over.

Learn more about how to temper chocolate.

4) Pour the vegan white chocolate into a mold

Pour the mixture into your preferred chocolate mold. You can order chocolate bar molds online or get creative pour the chocolate ½ inch high in paper cups. Lift your mold up about an inch or so and drop it onto the counter top a couple times to release excess air bubbles. Allow the chocolate to solidify at room temperature overnight if possible to allow it to crystallize properly. If your kitchen is too hot for the fat to solidify then place it in the refrigerator after about 30 minutes. Remove the white chocolate from the mold and store it in an air tight container for up to 6 months in a cool, dark place. This recipe makes 3.5 ounces of Vegan White Chocolate.

Chocolate Mold


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Hi Mattie,

Is this based of Hannah's white chocolate from the Bittersweet Vegan blog?

You can also use vanilla powder and you won't have to worry about any clumping from the vanilla extract.

I have had trouble in the past with my vegan chocolate baking out of things like cookies because of they very low melting point mine had. I haven't done a true temper but I was careful and it still had the snap/shine of tempered chocolate once it was molded and wasn't crumbly (except in the batch where I used vanilla extract and not vanilla powder)

Have you had any issues with the chocolate melting out of baked goods? It tasted great and would be nice to dip fruit/biscotti in but I'd really like a vegan white chocolate I could bake with! I think I even tried freezing the chocolate chunks before I baked with them and that didn't work either...

anyway, I can't wait to try your recipe!
Reviewed by linda January 07, 2014

have to try

Hi Mattie,

Is this based of Hannah's white chocolate from the Bittersweet Vegan blog?

You can also use vanilla powder and you won't have to worry about any clumping from the vanilla extract.

I have had trouble in the past with my vegan chocolate baking out of things like cookies because of they very low melting point mine had. I haven't done a true temper but I was careful and it still had the snap/shine of tempered chocolate once it was molded and wasn't crumbly (except in the batch where I used vanilla extract and not vanilla powder)

Have you had any issues with the chocolate melting out of baked goods? It tasted great and would be nice to dip fruit/biscotti in but I'd really like a vegan white chocolate I could bake with! I think I even tried freezing the chocolate chunks before I baked with them and that didn't work either...

anyway, I can't wait to try your recipe!

Owner's reply

Hi Linda, This white chocolate isn't based off Hannah's awesome looking white chocolate. I should try hers and see how it works out. I've thought of un-publishing this white chocolate recipe because currently it doesn't yield a chocolate that has the exact mouthfeel of a dairy-based white chocolate. Come to think of it, I've never tasted a vegan white chocolate that I've liked. This is likely because of the lack of milk solids which is so important to mouthfeel in white chocolate. The milk solids are extra important in leading to structure in the absence of the dark starchy cocoa solids. These milk solids are why traditional white chocolate holds structure during baking and doesn't melt out.

In vegan versions of white chocolate, we're left to add soy milk powder which doesn't even come close to milk solids for adding structure.

I'd bet that soy protein isolate might be able to work but don't use it as much these days because it's basically turned into a bad word in vegan circles. I'd love to look into using coconut milk powder but it's extremely exotic and currently not even available in a vegan version. So this recipe is a work in progress. I think I'll get it on par with traditional white chocolate eventually. Thanks for the interest!

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Hi, I can't find water free vanilla basis here in Brazil, could I make it with vanilla paste? In this case, what amount would it be? Great site! Thanks.
Reviewed by Juliana November 13, 2013

doubt

Hi, I can't find water free vanilla basis here in Brazil, could I make it with vanilla paste? In this case, what amount would it be? Great site! Thanks.

Owner's reply

Hi Juliana! If the vanilla paste doesn't contain water, you should be able to use it in this white chocolate, although I don't know how much. You really don't need a lot- vanilla really just plays in the background in white chocolate and shouldn't really be noticed. If it contains even a few drops of water, it's not recommended because the water can cause seizing. Good luck!

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For Katy below living in India: use coconut milk powder. Easy to find, cheap and creamy! Goodluck :-)
Reviewed by Nadia September 01, 2013

Soy milk powder substitute

For Katy below living in India: use coconut milk powder. Easy to find, cheap and creamy! Goodluck :-)

Owner's reply

Wow, thanks so much for mentioning this Nadia! A quick Google search turned up a company that's about to market a truly vegan version of coconut milk powder without milk protein as a "carrier ingredient". I can't wait to test this out in vegan white chocolate!

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I have used this recipe and was really impressed but have a few questions:

1) I can't find and vanilla essence that is entirely water free - I'm not sure if this is just something that it's hard to find in England or if a little water is ok? When I made it I used the seeds from a vanilla pod but this would be expensive to repeat regularly.

2) I found the chocolate to be a little powdery and not as creamy as I was hoping. I wondered if this is due to the use of icing sugar and soy milk powder. If people ask I tell them that I am a vegan but in reality I eat ahimsa (this means that I will eat milk/eggs if they come from animals who will never be killed and whose off-spring will live out their full lives also.) There are a couple of ahimsa farms in the UK so I can access ahimsa milk; I am aware that sometimes chocolate is made with condensed milk and was wondering if by condensing some of my milk with sugar to make sweetened condensed milk I could then use this to give richness and substance to the chocolate. Do you think this would work? Could you give me any advise on quantities? White chocolate is one of the things I miss most since I gave up commercial milk products and I would love to be able to recreate a really creamy flavour!

3) How much difference does the quality of the cacao butter make? Do you think this could be the problem with my chocolate?

Thanks a lot - this website has improved my enjoyment of food and cooking no-end!
Rating 
 
5.0
helen Reviewed by helen August 15, 2013
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vanilla / soy milk powder

I have used this recipe and was really impressed but have a few questions:

1) I can't find and vanilla essence that is entirely water free - I'm not sure if this is just something that it's hard to find in England or if a little water is ok? When I made it I used the seeds from a vanilla pod but this would be expensive to repeat regularly.

2) I found the chocolate to be a little powdery and not as creamy as I was hoping. I wondered if this is due to the use of icing sugar and soy milk powder. If people ask I tell them that I am a vegan but in reality I eat ahimsa (this means that I will eat milk/eggs if they come from animals who will never be killed and whose off-spring will live out their full lives also.) There are a couple of ahimsa farms in the UK so I can access ahimsa milk; I am aware that sometimes chocolate is made with condensed milk and was wondering if by condensing some of my milk with sugar to make sweetened condensed milk I could then use this to give richness and substance to the chocolate. Do you think this would work? Could you give me any advise on quantities? White chocolate is one of the things I miss most since I gave up commercial milk products and I would love to be able to recreate a really creamy flavour!

3) How much difference does the quality of the cacao butter make? Do you think this could be the problem with my chocolate?

Thanks a lot - this website has improved my enjoyment of food and cooking no-end!

Owner's reply

Great questions helen! The vanilla extract I use here in the US is alcohol based and as far as I know, 100% water-free. They do make vanilla extracts that are glucose-based (labeled as alcohol-free) and I don't personally prefer those because I like the idea of alcohol being a better medium for infusing vanilla flavors. If you're concerned about water (which you should be- more on that below) then you'd be right to use a vanilla bean. It's going to be a little more expensive as you noticed though.

This recipe is constantly evolving as I look for ways to make a creamy white chocolate. To tell you the truth, I've thought about delisting this recipe until I can nail it, because the powderiness is a consistent problem. The issue is that white chocolate needs solids in order to feel creamy on the palate. Otherwise it's just melted fat that doesn't quite feel right. In dairy-based white chocolate they use milk solids that dissolve into the fat. Soy milk powder and confectioners sugar always seems to contribute a slight level of graininess. I could probably get around the confectioners sugar issue by increasing the amount of time it was mixed. But I'd still have the issue of the soy milk powder contributing graininess.

One of the things that makes this so hard in a vegan white chocolate is because in the chocolate world, water is the enemy. Even a few drops of water causes the cocoa butter in chocolate to separate in a process called seizing. This means that even condensed milk won't work in chocolate due to the water it contains (although it would make a stellar ganache if you added enough of it). Eventually I need to find something that works more similar to milk solids and can really disperse into the mixture while adding mouthfeel to go along with the fat. Feel free to message me if you have any ideas or insight. I'll be sure to update this recipe with the most recent developments so everyone can benefit. Good luck!

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I live in India where vegan milk powders are not available. Is there any substitute that you can suggest? Or any homemade milk powder recipe? Thank you so much!
Reviewed by Katy July 24, 2013

Milk Powder Substitute

I live in India where vegan milk powders are not available. Is there any substitute that you can suggest? Or any homemade milk powder recipe? Thank you so much!

Owner's reply

Hi Katy! Unfortunately, you'd need a food dehydrator to make milk powder at home and even then, I don't know if it would be possible to do without having the milk spoil before it dehydrates. I don't recommend making this white chocolate recipe without a powdered non-dairy or even dairy milk powder because the milk gives the chocolate body; otherwise, it would just be fat and sugar which would be pretty uninteresting to eat. Maybe someone out there can think of a substitute and chime in!

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Help! Not long after I added the vanilla extract, the nice, smooth mixture curdled. No amount of whisking will mix the solid lumps back into the melted cocoa butter. What did I do wrong? What do I do now??!!
LcoyoteS Reviewed by LcoyoteS April 19, 2013
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (1)

Curdling

Help! Not long after I added the vanilla extract, the nice, smooth mixture curdled. No amount of whisking will mix the solid lumps back into the melted cocoa butter. What did I do wrong? What do I do now??!!

Owner's reply

Sorry it didn't work out LcoyoteS. Is your vanilla extract alcohol-free by chance? If it is, it might contain a little bit of water which is the enemy of chocolate. If so, let me know and I'll revise the recipe.

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It's "palate", not "palette".
Rating 
 
5.0
Reviewed by Kate January 06, 2013

Spelling

It's "palate", not "palette".

Was this review helpful to you? 
Thanks for sharing! I tried making white chocolate once but without a recipe and the result... Well, not great:s . I'm sure it will turn out better this time:) for those of you that can't get soy milk powder, I buy mine from iherb. It's called better than milk: http://iherb.com/p/31943?rcode=dij596 . They have fast delivery and a good selection in vegan products. If it's your first time shopping with them you can use discount code dij596 :)
Reviewed by Anna December 04, 2012

Soy milk powder

Thanks for sharing! I tried making white chocolate once but without a recipe and the result... Well, not great:s . I'm sure it will turn out better this time:) for those of you that can't get soy milk powder, I buy mine from iherb. It's called better than milk: http://iherb.com/p/31943?rcode=dij596 . They have fast delivery and a good selection in vegan products. If it's your first time shopping with them you can use discount code dij596 :)

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Thanks a bunch for this post! I used the tempering information to make a honey sweetened version. It's unbelievable the difference tempering can make. Thanks a ton! :)
Rating 
 
5.0
Reviewed by Erin @ Texanerin Baking October 15, 2012

Thanks a bunch for this post! I used the tempering information to make a honey sweetened version. It's unbelievable the difference tempering can make. Thanks a ton! :)

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like a lot of the commenters - i cant seem to be able to get my hands on soy milk powder. i thought about replacing that with nougat powder. think it'll work?
Reviewed by tali September 06, 2012

looks to die for - just a quick question

like a lot of the commenters - i cant seem to be able to get my hands on soy milk powder. i thought about replacing that with nougat powder. think it'll work?

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I was wondering if this would work without the the powder? I don't have any one hand and really want to make some white chocolate macadamia nut cookies. I will not be eating the chocolate alone, so I didn't know how it was effect the texture/taste. Thanks Mattie!
Reviewed by Nicole May 17, 2012

Soy powder

I was wondering if this would work without the the powder? I don't have any one hand and really want to make some white chocolate macadamia nut cookies. I will not be eating the chocolate alone, so I didn't know how it was effect the texture/taste. Thanks Mattie!

Owner's reply

Hi Nicole! White Chocolate is extremely dependent on a solid or else it's just sugar and fat which give it the wrong texture. I would recommend not making it if you don't have access to a non-dairy milk powder. I'm going to try making this with soy protein isolate also pea protein powder too in the near future.

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at what point do you add the sugar/soymilk powder? After step 3, before pouring it into the mold?
Reviewed by Rio4me April 16, 2012

at what point do you add the sugar/soymilk powder? After step 3, before pouring it into the mold?

Owner's reply

Hi Rio4me! I just updated this recipe to be more clear. The ingredients are to be added in Step 2. Thanks for letting me know about this discrepancy!

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This was so easy (and I am NOT a candy maker)!! I made mine with rice milk powder, vanilla powder and organic cane sugar all ground in a coffee grinder. It turned out a little grainy but I think it's because I didn't have an accurate enough thermometer for the tempering stage. Thanks for the awesome recipe :)

I do have a question about remelting and using for coating things... It's pretty thin and doesn't make a very good covering. Is there anything I could do about that?
Rating 
 
5.0
sugarmamabakeshop Reviewed by sugarmamabakeshop March 04, 2012
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (1)

Wonderful! Thank you!

This was so easy (and I am NOT a candy maker)!! I made mine with rice milk powder, vanilla powder and organic cane sugar all ground in a coffee grinder. It turned out a little grainy but I think it's because I didn't have an accurate enough thermometer for the tempering stage. Thanks for the awesome recipe :)

I do have a question about remelting and using for coating things... It's pretty thin and doesn't make a very good covering. Is there anything I could do about that?

Owner's reply

Hi Sugarmamabakeshop! Great idea on using the spice grinder to take care of the rice milk powder, vanilla powder and cane sugar! Ok, I've recently learned that we perceive graininess on our palates with anything larger than 20 microns. That's why this chocolate is somewhat grainy. A spice grinder will grind up things nice and small, but it's nowhere near 20 microns. Commercial chocolates use processes called conching and refining to get the particles this small.

I've looked into home chocolate production and the only thing that will grind particles smaller than 20 microns is an Indian spice grinding machine called an melanger (pronounced "me-LA-jie". They run just shy of $500 so it's going to be awhile before we're producing stuff rivaling artisanal chocolate.

If you want the chocolate to be more thick and viscous you could add more non-dairy milk powder- but then you'd have even more graininess on the palate.

Was this review helpful to you? 
This is pretty similar to the recipe I use. I've found also that powdered vanilla works better than extract and powdered sugar with arrowroot instead of cornstarch does create that grainy texture.

I was wondering though if you had any experience tempering this chocolate...? I could not get mine to temper at all and just ended up 'ruining' a lot of molded chocolates.
Reviewed by Gwendolyn September 23, 2011

This is pretty similar to the recipe I use. I've found also that powdered vanilla works better than extract and powdered sugar with arrowroot instead of cornstarch does create that grainy texture.

I was wondering though if you had any experience tempering this chocolate...? I could not get mine to temper at all and just ended up 'ruining' a lot of molded chocolates.

Owner's reply

Hi Gwendolyn! I just updated the article to include tempering information and other tricks to improve smoothness.

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This is great! Could this work with shea butter too?
Rating 
 
5.0
Reviewed by AikoVenus July 26, 2011

Fantastic!

This is great! Could this work with shea butter too?

Owner's reply

Hi AikoVenus! I'd recommend against using shea butter for this recipe due to it's non-chocolatey flavor. I've updated the recipe with links to where to find cocoa butter online if you're having trouble finding it. Good luck!

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After reading these comments, I wonder if I can substitute sugar with brown rice syrup. Anyone? If not, I will experiment and let you know later
Reviewed by Yashoda July 18, 2011

vegan white chocolate

After reading these comments, I wonder if I can substitute sugar with brown rice syrup. Anyone? If not, I will experiment and let you know later

Owner's reply

Brown rice syrup probably won't work because if its hydrophilic nature or ability to attract water Yashoda. If you have luck with it please report back and let us know!

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Hey, thanks for the recipe! I tried making it a few times (with caster sugar, not powdered), and I find that the crystals will not dissolve no matter how much I stir. I always get a block of gritty chocolate. Any suggestions?
Reviewed by Kate July 15, 2011

Hey, thanks for the recipe! I tried making it a few times (with caster sugar, not powdered), and I find that the crystals will not dissolve no matter how much I stir. I always get a block of gritty chocolate. Any suggestions?

Owner's reply

Hi Kate! I've updated the recipe to include instructions on grinding the soy milk powder and tempering for the smoothest chocolate yet. Let me know how it works out if you get a chance to try it again!

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I just tried this recipe, and found that after I added the powdered sugar/soymilk powder/salt mixture to the melted cocoa butter, it got all gritty. I think it's my organic powdered sugar, which seems to not dissolve for some reason. Can I use ultrafine sugar instead of powdered or is the cornstarch ingredient in powdered sugar necessary for this recipe? I also used vanilla powder and had no problems with texture.

Any suggestions to help with the gritty sugar would be greatly appreciated! Thanks, Rachael :)
Reviewed by Rachael Bush July 05, 2011

I just tried this recipe, and found that after I added the powdered sugar/soymilk powder/salt mixture to the melted cocoa butter, it got all gritty. I think it's my organic powdered sugar, which seems to not dissolve for some reason. Can I use ultrafine sugar instead of powdered or is the cornstarch ingredient in powdered sugar necessary for this recipe? I also used vanilla powder and had no problems with texture.

Any suggestions to help with the gritty sugar would be greatly appreciated! Thanks, Rachael :)

Owner's reply

Hi Rachael, I just updated the recipe to use superfine sugar (ultrafine works too) because overall it works better in this recipe. Powdered sugar contains about 3% corn starch which is not desired and can contribute to a graininess. Thanks for the feedback!

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This recipe is SO EASY and it turned out delicious, creamy, smooth and easy to use in other recipes... (like white chocolate peanut butter blondies)

I will definitely be making this more, and in fun shapes to share as a yummy gift.

Thanks for the great recipe!
Rating 
 
5.0
Renoodle Reviewed by Renoodle May 02, 2011
Top 50 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (4)

Awesome and Easy!

This recipe is SO EASY and it turned out delicious, creamy, smooth and easy to use in other recipes... (like white chocolate peanut butter blondies)

I will definitely be making this more, and in fun shapes to share as a yummy gift.

Thanks for the great recipe!

Owner's reply

White Chocolate Peanut Butter Blondies is brilliant! I have to make that now. So happy you like the white chocolate!

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Thrilled to find this recipe! My advice is to weigh the ounces of cocoa butter before placing it in the saucepan rather than using a measuring cup. I made my own powdered sugar in the food processor (after an unsuccessful attempt with commercial powdered sugar with a slightly different recipe) which, in retrospect, shouldn't be necessary with this recipe. Things were going beautifully until I added the vanilla extract and the batch immediately clumped up and separated. So, next time I will just skip the vanilla extract and call it good.
Reviewed by Christina December 08, 2010

Thanks!

Thrilled to find this recipe! My advice is to weigh the ounces of cocoa butter before placing it in the saucepan rather than using a measuring cup. I made my own powdered sugar in the food processor (after an unsuccessful attempt with commercial powdered sugar with a slightly different recipe) which, in retrospect, shouldn't be necessary with this recipe. Things were going beautifully until I added the vanilla extract and the batch immediately clumped up and separated. So, next time I will just skip the vanilla extract and call it good.

Owner's reply

Hi Christina, I experimented with different sugars too when designing this recipe and ended up going with powdered sugar due to it's fineness. You shouldn't have clumpage issues when you add the vanilla extract to this recipe as long as the mixture is warm enough and you just power-whisk through it. Good luck!

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Thanks for sharing this recipe. I wonder if I could replace soy with rice milk or almond milk in the same proportions. And I bet a lot of soy-intolerant people would appreciate the tip too.
Also, bulkfoods.com is quite cool for cheap bulk ingredients sourcing.
Reviewed by Fred November 01, 2010

Vegan white Chocolate is hot!

Thanks for sharing this recipe. I wonder if I could replace soy with rice milk or almond milk in the same proportions. And I bet a lot of soy-intolerant people would appreciate the tip too.
Also, bulkfoods.com is quite cool for cheap bulk ingredients sourcing.

Owner's reply

Hi Fred,

There should be no issues with substituting the soy milk powder with rice milk powder or almond milk powder if you can find it. I've never seen these products on the market so I went with soy milk powder.

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THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU! I've been wanting to do things with white chocolate forever and never found a good recipe. I'm so excited to try this!
Rating 
 
5.0
Renoodle Reviewed by Renoodle November 01, 2010
Top 50 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (4)

Thank you!

THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU! I've been wanting to do things with white chocolate forever and never found a good recipe. I'm so excited to try this!

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