How to Make Vegan Butter - Regular Vegan Butter - Coconut Oil Base

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Rating 
 
4.0

really great!

This was my first attempt at making vegan butter. I subbed rice milk (don't use soy), using rice milk powder, reconstituted. It worked well. For color, I added about 1/8 tsp. of turmeric (which couldn't hurt, you know). I might reduce the salt some next time (I love sweet butter.) Or, I'll try making it into an herb butter.

There's a 'gummy' quality to the butter (not in mouth feel, but on the spreader.) Is this the lecithin (sunflower) or the xanthan gum?

I buy "Melt", and it's very similar in taste. Melt has no gums (or milk, for that matter.) Just wondering if one could duplicate this at home.

Thank you for this recipe!

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4.0

butter-

great recipe! I'm only giving it a 4/5 for now because my butter was a fail- I experimented with flax seed milk... curdled just a tiny bit!!!! lol. Going to try again tomorrow with almond milk. I don't have soy milk. Could you possibly include pictures of the curdled milk above or offer suggestions to improve the butter if I want to use something like almond milk? I made the whole thing but it literally has no flavor. I'm inclined to think it's because of the type of milk I used. Also, I don't have a food processor, I have a blender. Do you know how long I should blend for? (I have a blend tec). Recipe shows promise for me and I'm excited to try it again.

I think I'll use my flop batch tomorrow in a baking recipe and try again.

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4.0

I really appreciate all the work that went into this recipe, the trial and error and research. I made this recipe a while back, and while it was almost perfect, my only complaint was that it had a salad dressing/mayo like taste. Granted, I used olive oil, so that probably contributed to that taste. But the vinegar taste was very strong too. I'm wondering if I used a more innocuous oil, is there a more mild vinegar I could use?

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4.0

In reply to "that person" who says coconut oil is not the great product we all think it is. . . . do more research. Coconut oil contains MCTs; medium chain triglycerides. The fat in coconut oil is NOT stored as fat in our bodies but helps with the efficient burning of energy. Coconut oil has countless health benefits. This is not "new hype". Coconut oil has been around for a long time and there are numerous studies you can read about it. You're not a downer, you're just mis-informed. If you know how to ferret out the proper information on the internet , you'd see how wonderful coconut oil really is :)

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Rating 
 
4.0

Great butter!

Love this butter! Tried it yesterday and it came out perfect, I used it to make a banana loaf and an apple cake and both turned out great. Next step: making it savoury with garlic and herbs.

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Rating 
 
4.0

Great!

This is a baker's delight. My vegan, gluten free son has a bad reaction to Earth Balance. Although this doesn't have much taste at all (4/5 stars), it works well in recipes that call for butter ( Jules gluten free biscuits and cookies in particular). He uses it in potatoes as a spread. Yesterday, I quadrupled the recipe to have plenty on hand.
@Robyn, I also use the soy granules, and they are visible but don't seem to affect the texture at all. Yesterday, I ran them through a coffee grinder which did "powder" them, but still noticeable in the butter.

Owner's reply

So glad the Vegan Butter works well for you AnneR! I have some other varieties at http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/fats/vegan-butters that have different flavor profiles. I recommend Cultured European Style Vegan Butter if you prefer an additional complex buttery kick. Thanks for the great tip on making the soy lecithin granules smaller for more effective dissolving!

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Rating 
 
4.0

Soya Lecithin Granules

Hi Mattie!

I tried out this recipe today for the first time, I'm new to vegan baking and I am so stoked that there is a way to make your own vegan butter!

It worked brilliantly, the only thing that went wrong was that the soya lecithin granules didn't dissolve completely when processing in the food processor, so I ended up with little yellow specs in my butter...

Am I doing something wrong? Is there something I could try to avoid that problem? I don't think I can get hold of liquid soya lecithin here in South Africa...

Thanks in advance and thanks again for your awesome recipes! :)

Robyn xxx

Owner's reply

Hi Robyn! The soy lecithin granule flecks has been an issue with some of the other commenters here as well. I've tried to recreate the problem but I haven't been able to because I believe the soy lecithin granules I use, which are Bob's Red Mill, dissolve more easily.

Please try increasing the time the mixture mixes in the food processor. I would imagine that after a few minutes of processing they should be well dissolved. If not, try heating the mixture in a saucepan until very warm, but not hot. Then try processing as normal until the soy lecithin granules are dissolved. Good luck!

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4.0

So glad to have found this!

Hello,
I have been searching and searching the shops and online for a vegan butter (and shortening) that doesn't contain palm oil, all the while getting more and more hopeless.

I want to bake cookies for animal rescue charities, but I just can't see how morally I can do it, unless all the ingredients in the cookies don't cause harm to animals. Palm oil does directly cause harm to animals. And there's my conundrum!

I've contacted all the major companies in the UK, and they all tell me the same thing. That the palm oil they use is RSPO certified. But the system seems to be flawed, and I don't think what's on offer is good enough.

So I was very happy to come across you recipes for vegan butter and shortening! :)

I've got a couple of questions though, hope you can answer!

1. I've got access to soy milk (6% soy beans, water, apple juice concentrate, and salt) but also soy cream (Water,Sunflower Oil (8.4%) ,Hulled Soya Beans (3.8%) ,Modified Tapioca Starch ,Fructose-Glucose Syrup ,Emulsifiers (Soya Lecithin, Sucrose Esters of Fatty Acids) ,Thickeners (Locust Bean Gum, Carrageenan) ,Flavouring ,Sea Salt ,Antioxidant (Tocopherol-Rich Extract)
Which do you think would yield a more buttery flavour?

2. I noticed you mentioned a few months ago that coconut vinegar gives a more buttery flavour, would you think it is worth purchasing for baking cookies (as it's quite expensive)?

3. Also bit of a silly one, would the fact that the butter/shortening has a short shelf life, effect the shelf life of the end product do you think? I want to make sure I can send the cookies out and not worry about them going moldy too quickly.

And finally. You should definitely start up a vegan butter/shortening company!!! I would be your first overseas customer! :D

Owner's reply

Great Vegan Butter questions Laura! I understand your concern regarding wanting animal friendly ingredients. Here's hoping that coconut oil remains an animal safe ingredient! I'd think that the soy milk would result in tastier vegan butter than the soy cream due to it having more protein that can be denatured by the acid. But who knows! I recommend doing your own test by trying both and seeing which one yields tastier butter. The soy cream might have stuff hidden in that "Flavoring" designation that would make a tastier end product and lead to better butter.

Substituting half coconut vinegar for the apple cider vinegar does yield a slightly better flavor for me, but I don't think it would be worth the extra cost in vegan cookies, unless you were entering a baking competition or something;) Or, say if the coconut vinegar truck broke down near your house and you were able to get a few gallons for free.

The shorter shelf life of the Vegan Butter wouldn't be an issue in a baked product like a cookie because it has enough sugar to deactivate the microbes that cause mold, unless your cookies were ridiculously moist. Cookies usually dry out as they age instead of getting moldy.

I remember seeing someone on the internet a year or so ago marketing an artisanal vegan butter and I was so happy. I'm hoping someone takes it and runs with it! I think it's doable. I need to stay here and run this website though and hopefully come up with other tasty things to help vegan bakers. Good luck!

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(Updated: November 16, 2013)
Rating 
 
4.0

Very Happy With My First Attempt!!

I tired this recipe for the first time today using coconut milk and sunflower lecithin and my hand held immersion blender and I am very happy with the results! Thank you for working on and sharing this recipe. I am going to play a little with reducing the salt and vinegar, trying other acids and maybe increasing the gum or mixing with coco butter but still very happy with the initial results. I was a vegan for 8 years but became soy and gluten intolerant in 2009 and went back to eating meat, eggs and dairy. I feel my health has suffered and am slowly going back to a vegan/vegetarian hybrid of something, lol. And I have been baking from scratch for almost 50 years and have to re-learn and try new gluten -free recipes. I have friends that have food allergies so I have been working on vegan baking, this is perfect! Thanks again

Owner's reply

So glad the Vegan Butter worked out VegasBev! Cheers to being open minded and figuring out what works for you. I've done some tests with vinegars and found that using 1/2 teaspoon apple cider vinegar and 1/2 teaspoon coconut vinegar produces even better flavor. I'm probably going to update all of my Vegan Butter recipes to reflect this after I do a little more testing. I also have soy-free Vegan Butters here if you do a search in the upper right-hand-corner of this page.

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Rating 
 
4.0

How to Make Vegan Butter

Here are some tips to make vegan butter healthier:

¼ + 1/8 teaspoon sea salt or Himalaayan salt (Such salt is richer in mineral enzymes.)

½ cup + 2 Tablespoons + 1 teaspoon cold-treated coconut oil (more nutritious) instead of refined oil (melted)

Ditch the Canola oil - it's genetically modified.

Ditch the soy lecithin (it has potential to cause heart disease...google for this info)

¼ teaspoon xanthan gum

Additionally, microwaving will kill many of the nutrients you want in your vegan butter.

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Rating 
 
4.0

Some really good ideas and worth experimenting with. I do have a problem with soya milk though, in fact any unfermented soy product.The only people that ingest these hormone laden poisons are Europeans where we have been fooled into thinking they are healthy when they are not, and our Asian friends know it. As a Chinese cook and they will tell you that in their country soy is primarilly used as a fertilizer, unless it's fermented into sauces or similar. There are non animal non GM curdling agents and rennet which if you can find them are good for making vegetarian, kosher, halal and some vegan cheeses and spreads.

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Rating 
 
4.0

Process is Still Likely to Create Triglicerides

I really like the recipe for making vegan butter, but I would stress that you are essentially doing the same thing chemically to the fat in your recipe as the people who make Crisco (and Earth Balance for that matter). Whenever someone makes any fat (plant, animal) more stable at room temperature (i.e. solid) the fats go through a hydrogenation process to add hydrogen to the lipid structure. This process increases the melting point of the fat. Commercial companies that make Crisco use an extrusion machine to accomplish this task. Earth Balance's process is the exact same, they just market their product differently. Butter churning breaks down the fats in cream and chemically changes them into a solid. Your process is using the speed of the food processor blades to break down the liquid fats into a structure that stays solid at room temperature. All of these processes share one thing in common; they all produce trans fats (triglycerides).

All that being said, I do really like your process and recipe. I would just caution making any claims that this process is somehow healthier than any other hydrogenation process commercial companies use. But as a DIY vegan butter recipe, I don't think there's a better one on the web.
I've included some good reading on the extrusion process and how commercial manufactures http://www.aseanfood.info/Articles/11024149.pdf

Owner's reply

Hi Jon, Thanks for your input. I think you're getting the food production procedure known as "extrusion" confused with butter production as well as vegan butter production. Food extrusion is not used for the processing of fats in the food industry as far as I'm aware. Food extrusion is used to squeeze, cook and press out products like pastas, dog food, veggie jerky, etc in a corkscrew-like configuration.

Crisco is a hydrogenated fat which is produced when hydrogen is passed through a fat (typically monounsaturated) that is liquid at room temperature. This hydrogenation process chemically alters the fat to act like a saturated fat, producing trans fats in the process. On the molecular level, the carbon chains that make up the fats are modified so they pack together more tightly, making the fat crystalize (get solid) at a lower temperature. Margarine manufacturers do this because they can take a affordable oil such as soy oil and turn it into a solid fat at a very low cost.

Fats coming from tropical regions are known as lauric fats and usually contain enough saturated fats to not need any chemical processing to make them more solid. On the molecular level, their carbon chains are also packed tightly like hydrogenated fats, but they don't contain trans fats like hydrogenated oils do.

Both Earth Balance and my method of Vegan Butter uses lauric fats blended with monounsaturated fats get the fat to a desired consistency. Mixing these fats via whisk, food processor or even by bare hand has no chemical effect and will not produce any hydrogenation related compounds. Furthermore, butter production is completely different- it involves churning which strip liquid surrounding dispersed fat globules which allows the globules to congeal into a solid mass.

There is a debate on the health aspects of plant-based saturated fats though. It depends on who you talk to in regards to whether it's more or less healthy than animal-based saturated fat. Thanks for the article link. It was a fascinating read on how extrusion effects nutrient content in foods. I'd love to get one of these but I'm about $80,000 short!
Thanks again for your input!

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Rating 
 
4.0

vegan butter

Could i use guar gum in place of xanthan gum?

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Rating 
 
4.0

Vegan Butter recipe

Mattie - I came accross you site recently and it is fantastic. Thank you for all the valuable information. I made your vegan butter yesterday and used it today to make the Chewey Chocolate Chip Cookies. I am not a vegan but am looking to eliminate as many animal fats from my diet as possible for cholestoral reasons. I have been looking for a butter substitute because I find that most vegan butters have a flat taste. I have used Earth Balance in other recipes but find it has a bland or oily taste in baked goods. I made a macadamic nut cream and used it as the base and it worked great. The end product does have strong coconut overtones though and that did come through in the cookies. It was not a problem but I would prefer a butter without that flavor. It was also a very expensive butter as coconut oil is fairly pricy these days.I will try the white chocolate version next but I am afraid of the fats in that. If you come across an idea that omits the coconut oil please post it as I think a more neutral flavor would be preferable. No matter what though it was a gret find and the cookies are exceptional and no one with ever know that they are not slathered in butter!!!

Owner's reply

Hi AndyB! As I mentioned in my other comment, feel free to use refined coconut oil in order to avoid the coconut flavors. Spectrum makes a refined coconut oil that's pretty easy to find in US health food stores. Coconut oil is expensive isn't it?! I just found that if I go to an Indian food store, coconut oil is about half the price as the health food store! But refined, aka deodorized coconut oil without the coconut flavor was nowhere to be found.

Cocoa butter has slightly less saturated fats than coconut oil (plant-based saturated fats are either good or bad, depending on the food scientist you talk to or the studies you choose to follow at the moment) but it's also rather expensive. You may want to try to find something in bulk on the internet in the long-term.

At any rate, I have a White Chocolate Vegan Butter recipe if you choose to go the cocoa butter route. You can buy deodorized cocoa butter on the internet and it'll work perfectly in the recipe below.
http://veganbaking.net/fats/vegan-butters/783-white-chocolate-vegan-butter

Good luck!

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Rating 
 
4.0

Great Vegan Butter

I hope you get a patent for your recipes! With all the scientific information, you sound like Alton Brown. Are you related? ;-) Thanks so much!

Owner's reply

Thanks for the compliment Kelly! No relation but I would trounce Alton in an arm wrestling competition (due to my constant whisking of vegan butter) but that's all I've got. These recipes are not patented and free to flourish in the open world. Enjoy!

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4.0

I made the regular one about three weeks ago, and loved it so made the herbed and white chocolate flavours a week later too. Amazing! However, a few days ago I noticed that the regular one had grown mold! I have stored it in the fridge obviously, and it wasn't contaminated with anything to my knowledge - the mold is growing on the surface parts rather than where the knife has been. Any ideas on how to prevent this? I am worried the others will turn moldy too soon.

Owner's reply

Hi Melanie, Yes, this is an issue with vegan butter that is stored in the refrigerator for a few weeks or more. I'm currently experimenting with curdling with citric acid (derived from citrus fruits) that would do the curdling as well as provide vitamin C to preserve the vegan butter longer (apple cider vinegar contains acetic acid which doesn't have as much C). I'll post an update when I'm done testing. Thanks for your concern!

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