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<![CDATA[Vegan Hearth Bread Recipes]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/ <![CDATA[Vegan Hearth Bread Recipes]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/images/stories/logo.png http://www.veganbaking.net/ http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/hearth-breads/one-hundred-percent-wholemeal-wheat-bread <![CDATA[100% Wholemeal Wheat Bread]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/hearth-breads/one-hundred-percent-wholemeal-wheat-bread 100% Wholemeal Bread A recipe from my book Triumph of the Lentil, this is my staple bread recipe. Even with a newborn and a toddler to look after I manage to bake this twice a week, so that we never have to buy bread. Because of the slow rising time it requires very minimal kneading (only enough to mix in the flour), doesn’t require any oil or sugar to taste good and stays fresh for longer. The slow rise develops the gluten in the same way that kneading would, but results in a superior taste.

Each rise can take between eight and twenty hours and put in the fridge at any stage, to be baked within two weeks. I like to make each rise around twelve hours. It can also be sped up a little, to make the total time as little as 16 hours by doubling the amount of yeast and combining the first and second rise together. {loadposition share}100% Wholemeal Bread

A recipe from my book Triumph of the Lentil, this is my staple bread recipe. Even with a newborn and a toddler to look after I manage to bake this twice a week, so that we never have to buy bread. Because of the slow rising time it requires very minimal kneading (only enough to mix in the flour), doesn’t require any oil or sugar to taste good and stays fresh for longer. The slow rise develops the gluten in the same way that kneading would, but results in a superior taste.

Each rise can take between eight and twenty hours and put in the fridge at any stage, to be baked within two weeks. I like to make each rise around twelve hours. It can also be sped up a little, to make the total time as little as 16 hours by doubling the amount of yeast and combining the first and second rise together.
Kitchen time 5 minutes, Resting time 16-60 hours, Baking time 35-60 minutes.

Find more Whole Wheat recipes on Veganbaking.net
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100% Wholemeal Wheat Bread Recipe

First rise

1/3 teaspoon fresh yeast, or 1/6 teaspoon dried 
1 cup wholemeal wheat flour 
1 cup cold water 
 
Mix these together and set aside for 8-20 hours 

Second rise

2 cups cold water 
3 cups wholemeal wheat flour 
 
Mix this into the rest of the dough and set aside for 8-20 hours 

Third rise

2 teaspoons salt 
1 cup cold water 
3 cups wholemeal wheat flour 
 
Mix this in thoroughly to the rest of the dough. It may need to be briefly kneaded to incorporate all the flour. Set aside for 8-20 hours. 

To bake

Preheat the oven with a pizza stone in it to 450-500F (230-260C) or as hot as your oven will go. When the pizza stone has been in there for at least half an hour, shape the loaves into whatever shapes you wish*, and coat in sesame seeds, cornmeal, or flour, making sure any cracks in the dough are on the bottom of the loaf. Place on the pizza stone, slash a few times with a bread knife, close oven door and reduce heat to 390-450F (200-230C).
 
Bake until the bottom of the loaves sound hollow when tapped, about 35-60 minutes. 
 
*to shape into Vienna type loaves like the ones in the picture, get a dinner plate and cover it in sesame seeds, semolina, cornmeal, or flour. Get the portion you want to form into a loaf and place it over this as a flat-ish circle. Take the sides of this circle and fold them up to form a log, flattening the seam. Place seam-side down on the preheated pizza stone. This recipe makes 2 medium loaves of 100% Wholemeal Wheat Bread.

About the author: Hilda is the author of Triumph of the Lentil: Soy-Free Vegan Wholefoods for all Appetites

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Tue, 02 Aug 2011 03:47:40 -0400
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/hearth-breads/nine-grain-whole-wheat-bread <![CDATA[Vegan Nine Grain Whole Wheat Bread]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/hearth-breads/nine-grain-whole-wheat-bread Nine Grain Whole Wheat BreadThis Vegan Nine Grain Whole Wheat Bread recipe is unique in that it sports nine grains and contains 100% whole wheat flour for the rest of the ingredients which adds a superb flavor and texture not found in many other breads. Baking a bread with both of these features involves a little more effort but I think you'll agree that it's time well spent. This bread differs from a regular bread recipe in two ways: First, the grains are soaked so they soften and integrate into the loaf. Second, since we're using 100% whole wheat flour for the rest of the flour we need to soak it overnight so the bran softens. This softened bran will enable a more efficient rise because the bran won't cut gluten strands. It will also allow for a more supple crumb. These soaked flour and grains are technically referred to as, what else? A soaker. I suspect the bread baker who coined this term was having a creativity block the day he named this method. {loadposition share}Nine Grain Whole Wheat Bread

This Vegan Nine Grain Whole Wheat Bread recipe is unique in that it sports nine grains and contains 100% whole wheat flour for the rest of the ingredients which adds a superb flavor and texture not found in many other breads. Baking a bread with both of these features involves a little more effort but I think you'll agree that it's time well spent. This bread differs from a regular bread recipe in two ways: First, the grains are soaked so they soften and integrate into the loaf. Second, since we're using 100% whole wheat flour for the rest of the flour we need to soak it overnight so the bran softens. This softened bran will enable a more efficient rise because the bran won't cut gluten strands. It will also allow for a more supple crumb. These soaked flour and grains are technically referred to as, what else? A soaker. I suspect the bread baker who coined this term was having a creativity block the day he named this method.

The benefits of using a soaker in bread baking

I know what you're thinking. That's lots of soaking right? But all that soaking has another benefit! The soaking of the grains and flour also enhances the flavor of the bread because during the soaking process, enzymes break out sugar from the grains which produces more flavor complexity.

Don't be afraid to raid the grain silo when selecting grains for this bread

Since this bread has a large amount of grains displacing the flour, it's a low-flour bread which is healthier because it has a lower glycemic index. Each grain brings it's own characteristics and nutritional benefits to the table. Feel free to swap out any of the six pre-cooked grains with other types you may have on hand. The grains I used in the here is what I was able to find in several health food stores at the time. They should be measured dry. Once you've made this loaf and it's come out to your liking I encourage you to buy an extra loaf pan or three and make this bread in multiple batches to save you time.

Find more Healthy recipes on Veganbaking.net
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Vegan Nine Grain Whole Wheat Bread Recipe

1 ½ cups + 2 Tablespoons warm water
1 ¼ teaspoons active dry yeast

2 ¾ cups whole wheat flour
2 Tablespoons + 1 teaspoon rolled oats

2 Tablespoons + 1 teaspoon amaranth
2 Tablespoons + 1 teaspoon buckwheat
2 Tablespoons + 1 teaspoon quinoa
2 Tablespoons + 1 teaspoon barley
2 Tablespoons + 1 teaspoon millet
2 Tablespoons + 1 teaspoon spelt
2 Tablespoons + 1 teaspoon kamut

1 ¼ teaspoons salt

1) Activate your yeast

In a small mixing bowl, whisk together the warm water and yeast. let the mixture sit for about 10 minutes so the yeast activates.

2) Whisk together the flour and oats

In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the flour and oats.

3) Make your pre-ferment, or poolish

Add the wet ingredients to the bowl containg the dry ingredients  and mix it with a spoon for about 1 minute so it's just incorporated. Cover the bowl with a plastic bag or a plate and allow the mixture to sit until it has doubled in size, about 1 ½ hours. Transfer the covered bowl to the refrigerator for 12 to 24 hours. This step helps break out more sugars from the flour that the yeast can use to develop flavor. It also softens the bran on the wheat for a softer crumb.

4) Soak your grains

Rinse the amaranth, buckwheat, quinoa, barley, millet, spelt and kamut. Transfer them to a medium mixing bowl and soak for about 24 hours.

5) Mix the dough and allow it to rise

Remove the grains and flour mixtures from the refrigerator. Drain the grains and add them to the bowl containing the flour and yeast. Sprinkle in the salt and knead in the grains until well incorporated, about 4 minutes. Cover the bowl with a plastic bag and let it rise until doubled in size, about 3 hours.

6) Place the dough in the loaf pan and allow it to proof or rise one last time

Roll the dough out into a square with edges that are the length of your loaf pan. Gently roll up the dough into a cylinder and place it in a lightly oiled loaf pan. Let it sit covered with a plastic bag until it reaches about 80% to 90% of its intended size, which should be about 40 to 60 minutes. The dough should now be domed. The proofing stage is where the dough takes most of it's shape. It's important to leave room under the plastic bag so the dough can rise sufficiently.

7) Bake the bread to perfection

Preheat your oven to 375F (191C). Remove the plastic bag so the dough can rest for about 10 minutes while your oven is preheating. During the baking process, the dough will rise another 10% to 20% of its intended size in the process known as oven spring. Bake until the internal temperature of the dough is 180-190F (82-88C) when read by an instant-read thermometer or until the bread sounds hollow when the underside of the loaf pan is tapped with a blunt object such as a rolling pin. This should take about 45 minutes. Rotate the loaf 180 degrees in the oven halfway through the baking duration for even baking.

8) Allow the bread to cool slightly before removing from the loaf pan

Remove the bread from the loaf pan after about 15 minutes. Allow the bread to cool on a wire rack until it's room temperature. This bread is best stored covered in a cool dark place or pre-sliced and stored in a plastic freezer bag in the freezer. This recipe makes one loaf of Vegan Nine Grain Whole Wheat Bread.

Mixed grains

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Mon, 25 Apr 2011 19:30:34 -0400
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/hearth-breads/three-herbed-focaccia <![CDATA[Three Herbed Focaccia]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/hearth-breads/three-herbed-focaccia Three Herbed Focaccia RecipeThe secret to making great focaccia involves using an herbed olive oil to lend an array of herb flavors, allowing the dough to ferment in a refrigerated state for at least 12 hours which allows complex bread flavors to develop and baking a wet dough at a very high temperature which ensures a soft, spongy texture and a crispy crust. Fresh herbs are paramount to infusing the right intensity of flavors in this focaccia recipe. Feel free to use any combination of fresh basil, thyme, rosemary, oregano, sage, savory or marjoram. A long, refrigerated fermentation allows naturally occurring enzymes within the flour to break out more sugars from the starches for the yeast to ferment. These extra sugars allow the yeast to built more flavor, sweeten the focaccia and caramelize under heat which contributes a multitude of enhanced flavors. {loadposition share}Focaccia Recipe

The secret to making great focaccia involves using an herbed olive oil to lend an array of herb flavors, allowing the dough to ferment in a refrigerated state for at least 12 hours which allows complex bread flavors to develop and baking a wet dough at a very high temperature which ensures a soft, spongy texture and a crispy crust. Fresh herbs are paramount to infusing the right intensity of flavors in this focaccia recipe. Feel free to use any combination of fresh basil, thyme, rosemary, oregano, sage, savory or marjoram. A long, refrigerated fermentation allows naturally occurring enzymes within the flour to break out more sugars from the starches for the yeast to ferment. These extra sugars allow the yeast to built more flavor, sweeten the focaccia and caramelize under heat which contributes a multitude of enhanced flavors.

The science behind cold rested doughs

A cold rest, otherwise known as a cold fermentation, is when a yeast leavened dough is placed in a refrigerated condition for an extended time, such as 8 to 48 hours. During this time, natural amylase enzymes in the flour get to work breaking down the longer strings of glucose molecules in the flour to more simple, individual glucose molecules. These more simple sugars are great for breads because they do three things:
  • They provide optimal food for the yeast. More food for the yeast means more tasty yeast flavor byproducts.
  • Some of these sugars don't get eaten by the yeast and end up contributing more sweetness and overall better flavor to the bread.
  • Some of this leftover sugar is caramelized during baking, leading to numerous additional flavor compounds that increase the flavor of the loaf.
As you can see, a cold rested dough is one of the primary secret weapons that artisanal bread bakers use to coax as much flavor as possible out of yeast leavened breads that feature only flour, salt, water and yeast. It requires no extra work on your part. You're just enabling the amylase enzymes to work for you. I find that this method of leavening is actually more convenient for me because it allows me to take a break and come back up to a few days later to finish my loaf.

It's important to note that in this chilled state, the yeast is pretty much dormant. It's the amylase enzymes that we're leveraging to break out the sugars. Some people refer to this state as a Cold Fermentation but it's not an acutal fermentation. It could more accurately be referred to as a Cold Enzymatic Reaction.

Three-Herbed Focaccia can be topped with the same toppings you would use for a pizza such as pesto, marinara sauce, vegetables or vegan cheese. If you choose to use a topping, add it just before the focaccia goes into the oven. The extra steps used in the preparation of this focaccia ensures a consistent, quality bread that will be worth the wait.

Find more Savory recipes on Veganbaking.net
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Three Herbed Focaccia Recipe

For the herbed olive oil

1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
1 Tablespoon fresh basil, chopped
1 Tablespoon fresh thyme, chopped
1 Tablespoon fresh rosemary, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
¼ teaspoon salt
1 pinch black pepper

For the focaccia

1 ¾ cups + 2 Tablespoons warm water
1 ¾ teaspoons active dry yeast

4 cups bread flour
2 teaspoons salt

¼ cup olive oil

1) Prepare the herbed olive oil

In a small saucepan, stir together the olive oil basil, thyme, rosemary, garlic, salt and pepper. Bring the oil up to about 100 to 150F (38 to 66C) then remove from heat. Set aside.

Thyme, rosemary and basil

2) Activate the yeast

In a smal mixing bowl, whisk together the warm water and yeast. Let it sit for about 10 minutes so the yeast activates.

3) Whisk the flour and salt

In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the flour and salt.

4) Form the focaccia dough

Add the water mixture and ¼ cup olive oil (regular, not herbed) to the bowl containing the flour mixture and stir with a large spoon until the dough comes together into a sticky ball.

5) Knead the focaccia dough

If Using an Electric Mixer

Mix on medium speed for 5 to 7 minutes or until the dough forms into a smooth, sticky ball and starts to pull away from the sides of the bowl.

If Mixing by Hand

Use a large spoon and stir the dough vigorously in a circular motion for about 2 minutes, then reverse stirring directions for another 2 minutes or until the dough forms into a smooth, sticky ball and starts to pull away from the sides of the bowl.

6) Continue to activate the gluten in the dough

Transfer the dough to a clean, lightly floured surface, stretch it into a rectangle and fold it over itself like a trifold letter. Cover the dough with plastic wrap and allow it to rest for 30 minutes. Repeat this process two more times.

7) Transfer the dough to the baking sheet and let it rise

Let the dough rise for one hour. Line a metal 14 x 17 inch baking sheet with parchment paper and coat it with about 2 Tablespoons of the herbed olive oil. A rimmed baking sheet is recommended; a flat one will work buy may drip a small amount of olive oil. Transfer the dough to the baking sheet taking care to preserve the original rectangular size of the dough as much as possible. If you use a rimmed baking sheet keep in mind that the dough is not supposed to touch the entire perimeter of the baking sheet rim.

8) Drizzle olive oil over the focaccia

Drizzle about 2 Tablespoons of the herbed olive oil over the dough and use a pastry brush to spread it out. Using your fingertips, make little indentations about ½ inch apart all over the top of the dough. These little indentations will encourage focaccia's characteristic holey texture.

9) Chill the focaccia to give it a cold rest

Cover the focaccia with plastic wrap and place it in the refrigerator from 12 hours to 3 days.

10) Drizzle more olive oil onto the focaccia

Remove the focaccia from the refrigerator and let it sit at room temperature for 3 hours.. Drizzle the remainder of the herbed olive oil like you did on Step 6.

11) Let the focaccia rise one more time

Cover the focaccia with plastic wrap and let it rise at room temperature for 3 hours.

12) Place toppings on the focaccia if using and bake to perfection

Preheat your oven to 475F (246C). If you have any toppings you're planning on adding to the focaccia, add them now. If you're using a flat baking sheet and the focaccia has expanded too close to the edge feel free to gently push the dough in a little from the sides. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes or until golden brown, rotating halfway through the baking rotation. The internal temperature should register 200F (93C) when measured with an instant-read thermometer.

13) Allow the focaccia to cool

After removing the focaccia from the oven, transfer it to a cooling rack after carefully lifting it and peeling it's parchment paper away. Allow to cool for at least 20 minutes before serving. Serve warm.
Store the focaccia wrapped in plastic wrap at room temperature for up to 5 days. This recipe makes a roughly 12 x 15 inch loaf of Three Herbed Focaccia.

Focaccia

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Tue, 11 Jan 2011 05:35:04 -0500
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/hearth-breads/sprouted-wild-yeasted-whole-wheat-bread <![CDATA[Sprouted Wild Yeasted Whole Wheat Bread]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/hearth-breads/sprouted-wild-yeasted-whole-wheat-bread Vegan Sprouted Wild Yeasted Whole Wheat BreadThis Sprouted Wild Yeasted Whole Wheat Bread recipe is a nod to how the first breads probably got their start. Wheat berries were probably softened with water, ground and left out in the elements where they were then populated by airborne yeasts and bacteria, causing the dough to rise slightly. Placing this dough on hot rocks in or near a fire probably resulted in a fine vegan treat like nothing else available at the time. {loadposition share}Vegan Sprouted Wild Yeasted Whole Wheat Bread

This Sprouted Wild Yeasted Whole Wheat Bread recipe is a nod to how the first breads probably got their start. Wheat berries were probably softened with water, ground and left out in the elements where they were then populated by airborne yeasts and bacteria, causing the dough to rise slightly. Placing this dough on hot rocks in or near a fire probably resulted in a fine vegan treat like nothing else available at the time.

The magic of flourless, sprouted wild yeast breads

Similar to Flourless Sprouted Wheat Bread and Wild Yeasted Wheat Bread, this bread is a great example of how amazing breads can be when you allow nature to do most of the work. This is not your grandmother's bread; since it utilizes sprouted, ground wheat berries that are then wild yeasted, the result is an extremely dense, hearty and flavorful loaf. Since the sprouting of the wheat berries and the wild yeasting of the dough provides so much complex flavor, there's no need to enrich the dough with sweeteners and excess salt. A little salt is added as a flavor enhancer. This bread is very similar to Manna Bread which I reviewed here. Due to it consisting of wild yeasted wheat berry purée, it doesn't rise considerably and is extremely dense. It takes several days to make but if you enjoy hearty, crusty, dense breads such as pumpernickel then it will be well worth it. Once you've mastered this bread feel free to make several loaves at a time, slice it then freeze it for maximum convenience.

Find more Wild-yeasted recipes on Veganbaking.net
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Sprouted Wild Yeasted Whole Wheat Bread Recipe

3 ½ cups wheat berries
1 ¼ teaspoon salt

6 Tablespoons water

1) Sprout the wheat berries

Soak the wheat berries for about 18 hours. Drain then sprout the wheat berries, rinsing 2 to 3 times per day until the sprout is barely visible. This should take about 24 to 36 hours. If the berries sprout and you don't have time to proceed to step 2, place them in the refrigerator to slow their sprouting rate down. Here's more information on sprouting grains.

2) Process the wheat berries

Pat the berries with a paper towel to remove as much moisture as possible. Divide the sprouted wheat berries roughly in half into two separate batches and process them in a food processor until they form a ball and break apart. This should take a few minutes per batch.

Sprout the wheat berries

3) Make the wild yeast starter

Add ½ cup of the wheat berry purée and 6 Tablespoons of water to a clean small bowl and mix together with a clean fork until well incorporated. Cover the bowl with a cheese cloth secured with a rubber band to keep flies out and keep it in a cool, dry place. Transfer the remaining purée into a covered container and refrigerate. Mix in 2 Tablespoons of wheat berry purée and 1 Tablespoon water into the smaller portion of the mixture every day for about 8 days. After about 8 days the mixture should be slightly bubbly and smell sour from fermentation. Although rare, if the mixture smells putrid it may have gotten contaminated with undesirable microbes. In this case you may be able to correct it by mixing in 2 more Tablespoons of wheat berry purée and waiting another 12 hours or so. If the mixture continues to smell putrid, discard the mixture and start over.

4) Knead the dough

Place the large portion of wheat berry purée on a large clean counter surface. Flouring this surface is not necessary. Squish it so it's flat, add the fermenting wheat berry mixture and salt. Fold over and knead the ingredients together.

5) Let the dough rise

Knead it for 15 minutes. The dough will start out a little firm and get stickier as the gluten gets activated and the dough warms from the heat of your hands. The dough will seem more moist than traditional bread dough- this is ok. Resist the urge to add additional flour like you would in a traditional bread recipe. Coat the dough with olive oil, place it in a bowl and cover the bowl with a plate or plastic bag. Let it rise for about 12 hours. When it's done rising do not degass the dough by squeezing the gasses out of it; we'll want to maintain the rise as much as possible and handle it extremely carefully from now on.

6) Proof the dough

With dampened fingers, carefully form the dough into a lightly oiled loaf pan, taking special care to press the gas out of the dough as little as possible. Cover it with the damp cloth and and let it sit, or proof, until it has domed slightly, about 4 hours.

7) Bake the vegan bread to perfection

Preheat your oven to 375F (191C). Bake until the internal temperature of the bread measured with an instant-read thermometer registers 180-190F (82-88C). If you don't have a thermometer, this is about 45 minutes or until the bottom of the loaf sounds hollow when the loaf pan is tapped with a blunt object like a rolling pin. Rotate the loaf 180 degrees in the oven halfway through the baking duration for even baking. Remove from the pan when cooled completely. This bread is best stored covered in a cool dark place or pre-sliced and stored in a plastic freezer bag in the freezer. This recipe makes one loaf of Sprouted Wild Yeasted Whole Wheat Bread.

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Mon, 31 May 2010 18:10:36 -0400