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<![CDATA[Vegan Enriched Bread Recipes]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/ <![CDATA[Vegan Enriched Bread Recipes]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/images/stories/logo.png http://www.veganbaking.net/ http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/quick-breads/apple-spice-bread <![CDATA[Vegan Apple Spice Bread]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/quick-breads/apple-spice-bread Vegan Apple Spice BreadI glanced over at my fruit basket yesterday and found four moldy looking apples at the bottom. They had been languishing there for over a week, with no one paying them any attention. Now, I'm a bit of a purist with my apples. I only like them tart and crunchy with faint green veins running through their flesh. Bruised apples with brown spots go straight on my list of foods I most hate to eat. Still, something had to be done with those apples, and without much of a plan, I peeled, cored, and chopped them up. 

Then I spied a jar full of demerara sugar that I'd bought recently, and inspiration took form. I decided I'd bake an apple bread. The principle would be the same as banana bread, only since apple has a higher water content, I could consider lowering the amount of fat in my recipe, and under bake slightly, so my cake would remain moist. A small quantity of vinegar provides just enough acid for leavening, and the baking soda helps it rise. This bread bakes up dense. {loadposition share} Vegan Apple Spice Bread

I glanced over at my fruit basket yesterday and found four moldy looking apples at the bottom. They had been languishing there for over a week, with no one paying them any attention. Now, I'm a bit of a purist with my apples. I only like them tart and crunchy with faint green veins running through their flesh. Bruised apples with brown spots go straight on my list of foods I most hate to eat. Still, something had to be done with those apples, and without much of a plan, I peeled, cored, and chopped them up. 

Then I spied a jar full of demerara sugar that I'd bought recently, and inspiration took form. I decided I'd bake an apple bread. The principle would be the same as banana bread, only since apple has a higher water content, I could consider lowering the amount of fat in my recipe, and under bake slightly, so my cake would remain moist. A small quantity of vinegar provides just enough acid for leavening, and the baking soda helps it rise. This bread bakes up dense. 
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I'm going through a phase these days in which I'm trying to limit my sugar intake. I find that more than a couple of teaspoonfuls a day gives me a sugar rush, and eventually leaves me feeling rather drained, so I'm switching to more natural sweeteners and sugar replacers. In this cake, I used stevia (something I'm still experimenting with) and agave. I would've used just stevia, but I find it often leaves an unpleasant aftertaste. So the agave provides some of the sweetness, and an all-pervading warmth. There's a grating of nutmeg in there, which hits your nose first, and is then backed by the agave, the apples and the toasty smell of whole wheat. This bread, toasted lightly, is perfect for breakfast. And for a tea time snack. Or for dessert. Or at any time, really. 

Find more Apple recipes on Veganbaking.net

Vegan Apple Spice Bread Recipe

1 ½ cups (about four medium-size) apples, peeled, cored, finely chopped and then cooked down for about 20 minutes
 
1 cup all-purpose flour
¾ cup whole wheat four
½ teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
A pinch of salt 
 
½ cup vegetable oil (I used sunflower seed oil)
4 teaspoons stevia
½ cup amber agave syrup
¼ teaspoon vinegar
 
1 Tablespoon demerara sugar
 
1)
Grease and dust a standard-sized loaf pan with flour. (I didn't have a loaf pan so I used a regular 6" cake pan with tall sides.) Preheat the oven to 330F (165C).
 
2)
In a large bowl, whisk together the flours, baking soda, nutmeg and salt. 

3)
In a medium bowl, whisk together the oil, stevia, agave, vinegar and applesauce. 

4)
Create a well in the middle of the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients into that. Stir gently with a wooden spatula to combine. 

5)
Once they are just combined (Just make sure there are no major visible lumps of flour) pour into the prepared pan. 

6)
Scatter demerara sugar over the top and bake in the preheated oven for about 45-50 minutes, or until the top is nicely browned and a skewer inserted inside comes out clean. 
 
Allow the loaf to cool on a wire rack before cutting. The crumb will become more dense and easy to slice on the next day. Vegan Apple Spice Bread should keep, sealed airtight, for 3 to 4 days. I like to cut myself a slice every now and then, toast it on either side, and eat it with a cup of tea. This recipe makes 1 loaf of Vegan Apple Spice Bread.

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Mon, 02 Jan 2012 05:00:00 -0500
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/yeasted-enriched-breads/flourless-sprouted-wheat-bread <![CDATA[Flourless Sprouted Whole Wheat Bread]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/yeasted-enriched-breads/flourless-sprouted-wheat-bread Vegan Flourless Sprouted Wheat BreadTraditional flour is ground endosperm powder which is the result of the flour mill removing most of the hard pieces and hence, nutrition from the wheat berry. I'm a huge fan of whole sprouted grains because they're more flavorful and contain significantly more nutrients than bread made with traditional flour. This Flourless Sprouted Whole Wheat Bread recipe utilizes sprouted wheat berries that are then ground into a purée. This requires a substantially hardy food processor. If you're not sure if your food processor is powerful enough, look on the bottom. It should say at least 6.5 Amps or "6.5 A". 

This bread was difficult to design due to the nature of the wheat berry. This hardy seed contains the germ which is the heart and soul of the seed. The germ is the embryo of the plant in its dormant state. It's accompanied by the starchy endosperm which acts as fuel for the germ when it sprouts or germinates. This package is encased in a firm fibrous shell called the bran. This protects the seed kind of like an egg shell protects an egg. 

{loadposition share}Vegan Flourless Sprouted Wheat Bread

Traditional flour is ground endosperm powder which is the result of the flour mill removing most of the hard pieces and hence, nutrition from the wheat berry. I'm a huge fan of whole sprouted grains because they're more flavorful and contain significantly more nutrients than bread made with traditional flour. This Flourless Sprouted Whole Wheat Bread recipe utilizes sprouted wheat berries that are then ground into a purée. This requires a substantially hardy food processor. If you're not sure if your food processor is powerful enough, look on the bottom. It should say at least 6.5 Amps or "6.5 A". 

This bread was difficult to design due to the nature of the wheat berry. This hardy seed contains the germ which is the heart and soul of the seed. The germ is the embryo of the plant in its dormant state. It's is accompanied by the starchy endosperm which acts as fuel for the germ when it sprouts or germinates. This package is encased in a firm fibrous shell called the bran. This protects the seed kind of like an egg shell protects an egg. 
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The science of sprouting wheat berries and making them into bread

In order to make bread from wheat berries, the wheat berries need to be softened so they can later be ground into a powder. Soaking the berries then allowing them to germinate for a couple days softens the berries. The germination step also has the advantage of releasing more nutrients as the seed prepares to become a plant. But what causes the germ to turn into a sprout and grow? During the soaking of the berries, enzymes called amylases in the bran layer become active and start to infiltrate the starch granules in the endosperm. Starches are made up of complex sugars which are made up of strings of glucose molecules. The amylases break the glucose molecules off of the starches into smaller groups of sugars consisting of one, two and three glucose molecules. Think of the amylase molecules cutting Fruit Loops off of a Fruit Loops necklace so they're smaller and easier for you to eat. Like us eating Fruit Loops, the germ happens to love these small sugars so it begins to grow and the seed continues to soften. This germination step assists leavening in breads because yeast also prefers glucose for it to function optimally.

Note: This is why some bakers, including yours truly, love storing bread doughs in the refrigerator overnight. It gives the amylases time to do their work while the cold temperatures keep the yeast dormant. The excess sugars in the dough and the increased amylase activity generates a more flavorful loaf with more yeast activity.

Once the seeds have sprouted to no more than ¾ the length of the grain, they're ground. The best way to do this is with a flour mill. I didn't want to disservice vegan bakers by instructing them to buy home flour mills that cost up to hundreds of dollars just to make flourless sprouted breads. There must be a better way to easily enjoy this uinique style of bread. If you do splurge on a home flour mill, you'll be rewarded with considerably fluffier and lighter bread. I settled on using a food processor to grind the wheat berries into a purée which results in an extremely dense, hearty loaf with chunks of wheat berries. I only recommend making this bread if you adore whole wheat breads. If you have a plush, soft spot for fluffy white breads I advise you to avoid this recipe.

As the endosperm hydrates, proteins contained within it called glutenin and gliadin unravel. Kneading, rest time or both contribute to the binding of these proteins into gluten. Gluten is a high protein, pliable rubbery mass that holds the bread together and acts like a net to trap rising C02 bubbles given off by the yeast.

Once the berries have been puréed, salt is kneaded in. This salt has a slight protective effect which lessens the chances that pathogenic microbes growing in the dough before the amylases can get their start. The dough is then left to rise and proof in a bread pan just as with normal flour-based bread.

The problem with bran husks

There is a reason there is a flour milling industry that's been considerably successful during the last several hundred years. The wheat berry doesn't lend itself well to the breads we know and love. The bran layer is the main culprit here due to how it cuts through the dough, severing critical gluten bonds as it's kneaded. The bran also acts as a barrier which blocks glutenin and gliadin from even getting the chance to join in the first place. Talk about a missed opportunity. Since these gluten bonds aren't able to be fully developed the bread is unable to hold the rising C02 coming off the yeast and the loaf results in a powdery brick.

In the course of developing this recipe I actually gave up at one point due to the amount of loaves I was producing that resembled fireplace sawdust wax logs. Maybe I could market these in cold climates and start a whole new industry? The flavor also wasn't interesting enough to justify the several days of preparation time. Finally, the bread crumbled while being sliced. The gluten just wasn't able to make strong enough bonds to hold the loaf together.

Still having some wheat berries in my pantry, I decided to give it another go. After I ground the soaked and sprouted wheat berries I had to step out before kneading in the yeast and other ingredients so I gathered the wheat berry purée into a ball and placed it in an air-tight container in the refrigerator for a few days. When I finally got around to making the bread I noticed it was rising while being baked! And the taste. The taste! The bread was like sourdough bread but didn't involve using a the traditional sourdough starter. Why was this happening? 

My Eureka! bread moment

It turns out that leaving the wheat berry purée to sit and rest or ripen was the missing link for this bread. During ripening a couple things happen. The stiff bran husk gets a chance to hydrate and soften considerably. This softening allows them to become flexible to the point of where they don't inhibit gluten development like they used to. The other miracle that happens during ripening is flavor development. As the wheat berries are sprouting out in the open, as the amylases are converting much of the starches in the germ to sugars, the wheat berries are also getting inoculated by natural airborne yeasts and bacterias such as Lactobacillus. When the wheat berry purée is allowed to rest, these bacterias and yeasts consume the sugars and impart flavors such as lactic acid as byproducts. This flavor development is exactly what happens in wild yeast starters involved in sourdough bread baking.

This bread is unique in that it rises extremely slowly. This is due to the bran husks creating tiny channels that allow the yeast's C02 to escape. Once I discovered the results after the ripening of the wheat berry purée I was able to refine my methods and develop the recipe below.

Find more Flourless recipes on Veganbaking.net

Flourless Sprouted Whole Wheat Bread Recipe

3 ¼ cups (620 grams) wheat berries (hard red winter wheat preferred)
1 ½ teaspoons salt
 
2 ¼ teaspoons, or one ¼ ounce package active dry yeast

1) Soak the wheat berries

Soak the wheat berries for 18 to 24 hours. Drain then sprout the wheat berries, rinsing 2 to 3 times per day until the sprout is no more than ¾ the length of the grain. This should take about 24 to 36 hours and will vary depending on the temperature and humidity of your kitchen. If the berries sprout and you don't have time to proceed to Step 2, place them in the refrigerator to slow their sprouting rate down. Here's more information on sprouting grains

2) Process the wheat berries and allow them to ripen

Add about half of the wheat berries to a food processor and sprinkle half the salt over them. Process until the mixture comes together into a ball which should take a minute or so. Stop the food processor and use a spatula to work around the perimeter of the food processor and push the mixture back down to the blades. Process again until the mixture gets too thick to mix any further and the blades just spin underneath, or about 1 minute. Transfer the wheat berry purée to a clean counter.
 
Process the other half of the wheat berries just as you did the first, taking care to add the other half of the salt. Add this wheat berry purée to the first batch on the counter and knead for about a minute to ensure the salt is evenly distributed throughout the whole mixture. 
 
Form all of the wheat berry purée into a tight ball and place it in an airtight covered container. Leave the container at room temperature for 1 to 2 days. This step is crucial because it allows the bran layer to soften and the amylase enzymes to break out sugar for the yeast to eat. Leaving the purée out also allows the bread to develop a complex sourdough flavor. If you don't prefer sourdough flavors, leave your purée out for no more than about 12 hours.
 
Feel free to taste the wheat berry purée and allow it to sour to your liking. Once its ripened to your preferred sourness either move to Step 3 immediately or freeze it for later use. If you place it in the refrigerator it will keep ripening. It's also important to not ripen the purée for more than 2 days because it can start to go rancid and become unsafe to eat. This can happen when the current residential yeasts and bacteria eat all the available sugars they can and die off, leaving the environment open to different types of harmful microbes. If your dough becomes rancid or you’re not sure if it’s safe to eat, discard it.

3) Add the yeast and knead the dough

Transfer the wheat berry purée to a clean counter, sprinkle the dry yeast over it and knead for no less than 20 minutes. The knead is lengthy to ensure as much glutenin and gliadin, as possible is drawn out of the wheat kernels and activated into gluten. It also allows the yeast to hydrate, become active and disperse into the dough. It’s fascinating to see how the gluten develops throughout the kneading process here! Towards the end of the knead you’ll start seeing extremely long strands of gluten develop.

4) Allow the yeast to get active

Transfer the dough to a medium mixing bowl and form it into a ball. Cover the bowl with a plastic bag and let it sit for about 1 ½ hours. This dough will not rise considerably because the bran husks create tiny channels that allow the yeast's C02 gas to escape instead of contribute to leavening. Most of the leavening in this bread is done during the proofing stage which is the second rise after it has been placed in a loaf pan.

5) Allow the bread to rise

Form the dough into a lightly oiled loaf pan, cover it with a plastic bag and and let it sit for about another 1 ½ to 3 hours. A loaf pan is essential here. This dough is too moist to bake in a freeform hearth style and will flatten considerably if baked in this manner. This is the part where your bread will do most of its leavening. This process will take longer due to the weight of the dough and the dough not being completely airtight due to the wheat berry and bran particles.

6) Bake to perfection

About 45 minutes before you’re going to bake the bread, Preheat your oven to 350F (177C). Bake until the internal temperature of the bread measured with an instant-read thermometer registers 180 to 190F (77 to 82C). If you don't have a thermometer, this is about 60 to 65 minutes. Remove from the pan when cooled completely. I recommend slicing this bread and storing it in a plastic freezer bag in the freezer. Stored this way it will keep for several months. This recipe makes one loaf of Flourless Sprouted Whole Wheat Bread.

Sprouted wheat berries

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Fri, 09 Dec 2011 05:00:00 -0500
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/quick-breads/fruit-sweetened-banana-bread <![CDATA[Fruit Sweetened Vegan Banana Bread - What do to with all those bananas in your freezer]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/quick-breads/fruit-sweetened-banana-bread
Vegan Fruit Sweetened Banana Bread“See those bananas over there?”, I asked, tilting my head towards the end of the aisle at the health food store. “I’ll buy fifteen of ‘em for half price”, I suggested confidently. The cashier paused for a moment, not knowing whether to believe me. Why would anyone want to buy bananas that were almost more suitable for the compost bin than the kitchen for any price? “Sure”, he sighed. He knew they were garbage unless I took them in. I laughed to myself when I realized how excited I was to buy bananas that most people wouldn’t even think of eating. I started to feel bad about not liberating the others but I had to get home; there was work to do! How cool would it be to peel the bananas, purée them and slow cook them into a thick syrup to use as a base for fruit sweetened banana bread? Finally, something to do with all those bananas laying around in your freezer!
{loadposition share}Vegan Fruit Sweetened Banana Bread

“See those bananas over there?”, I asked, tilting my head towards the end of the aisle at the health food store. “I’ll buy fifteen of ‘em for half price”, I suggested confidently. The cashier paused for a moment, not knowing whether to believe me. Why would anyone want to buy bananas that were almost more suitable for the compost bin than the kitchen for any price? “Sure”, he sighed. He knew they were garbage unless I took them in. I laughed to myself when I realized how excited I was to buy bananas that most people wouldn’t even think of eating. I started to feel bad about not liberating the others but I had to get home; there was work to do! How cool would it be to peel the bananas, purée them and slow cook them into a thick syrup to use as a base for fruit sweetened banana bread? Finally, something to do with all those bananas laying around in your freezer!
 

Overripe bananas are best for vegan banana bread

It turns out that this would be really cool. This Fruit Sweetened Vegan Banana Bread resulted in one of the most divine quick breads that I’ve ever made, rivaling only Yeasted Vegan Banana Bread in depth of flavor. Why use dark, spotty bananas that are on their way out? When bananas are yellow they contain mostly starch. As they ripen the starch converts to fructose and the bananas actually get considerably sweeter. This is why when you bake with bananas, you always want them dark and spotty. This banana bread utilizes the less-is-more technique; I used less spices and no traditional banana bread additions like vanilla extract or walnuts because I really wanted to showcase the power of fifteen bananas. That’s right- there’s a full banana in almost every slice. The vegan banana bread is made up of mostly banana purée; since the sugars consist of natural fructose which inhibits ice crystal formation, the bread doesn’t even freeze solid.

What cramming tons of bananas does to your vegan banana bread

Since we’re cramming fifteen bananas into a single loaf of bread, this isn’t going to go like your normal quick bread baking endeavors with you whisking ever-so-happily as birds tweet in the background. This banana bread won’t rise as high as usual because there’s less flour and thus, less starches to swell with water and gluten to trap rising gas bubbles. Since the sugars are mostly fructose which is hydrophilic, aka water loving, this bread has to be baked considerably longer than traditional banana bread. Slow cooking the banana purée causes considerable browning and caramelization of the fructose sugars which lends a rich, dark color and flavor that is reminiscent of molasses. Your house is going to smell divine when you’re cooking this stuff down. Baking powder is unnecessary because the high level of acidity from the bananas pares perfectly with a substantial addition of baking soda to give the loaf the best ratio of rise and structure.

Banana Puree after being cooked down

Find more Banana recipes on Veganbaking.net
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Fruit Sweetened Vegan Banana Bread Recipe

8 cups banana purée (about 15 dark bananas) cooked down to 3 ½ cups
 
1 ¼ cups whole wheat flour
1 ½ teaspoons baking soda
 
1 Tablespoons unrefined coconut oil
¾ teaspoon cinnamon
¾ teaspoon nutmeg
½ teaspoon salt

1) Cook your bananas down

Peel your bananas and discard the peels. Place the bananas in a food processor and process until smooth. Transfer the mixture to a slow cooker, set to low or 180F (82C), and cook while stirring occasionally until you have 3 ½ cups of banana purée. This should take about 16 hours.

2) Whisk the dry ingredients together

Preheat your oven to 325F (163C). Whisk the whole wheat flour and baking soda in a bowl and set aside. Lightly grease a loaf pan with canola oil and set aside.

3) Process the bananas purée with the flavor building ingredients

Add the reduced banana purée to the food processor and add the canola oil, coconut oil, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt. Process until smooth.

4) Mix the banana ingredients with the dry ingredients and bake to perfection

Pour the banana mixture into the bowl containing the dry ingredients and mix with a wooden spoon until thoroughly incorporated. Mixing thoroughly will ensure that the gluten in the flour gets activated and assists with binding. Pour the mixture into a loaf pan and bake for 1 hour and 10 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out with no crumbs attached. 

5) Let the vegan banana bread cool completely

Allow the loaf to cool completely before removing the banana bread. Carefully slice it in thin slices using a serrated knife. Store Vegan Fruit Sweetened Banana Bread in an air-tight plastic freezer bag in the refrigerator for up to one 1 or in the freezer for up to 3 months. I recommend storing it in the freezer and defrosting the slices in a toaster oven as-needed. This recipe makes one loaf of Fruit Sweetened Vegan Banana Bread.

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Wed, 30 Nov 2011 04:59:25 -0500
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/yeasted-enriched-breads/one-hundred-percent-rye-bread <![CDATA[100 Percent Rye Bread]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/yeasted-enriched-breads/one-hundred-percent-rye-bread 100 Percent Rye BreadAfter falling in love with rye breads I became fascinated with developing a bread containing 100 percent rye. I knew that taking all of the wheat flour out of a bread recipe would wreak havoc on the end result and a high-rising crusty bread would not be obtainable. This is because wheat flour is unique in that it contains two proteins in the wheat endosperm called glutenin and gliadin. When these proteins hydrate and undergo friction, they unravel like balls of yarn, bind together into sticky strands and form a structure building network. This elastic web of protein holds in air bubbles during leavening and acts as a structure builder after the bread cools, resulting in a high-rising, fluffy, springy loaf. {loadposition share}100 Percent Rye Bread

After falling in love with rye breads I became fascinated with developing a bread containing 100 percent rye. I knew that taking all of the wheat flour out of a bread recipe would wreak havoc on the end result and a high-rising crusty bread would not be obtainable. This is because wheat flour is unique in that it contains two proteins in the wheat endosperm called glutenin and gliadin. When these proteins hydrate and undergo friction, they unravel like balls of yarn, bind together into sticky strands and form a structure building network. This elastic web of protein holds in air bubbles during leavening and acts as a structure builder after the bread cools, resulting in a high-rising, fluffy, springy loaf.

The magic of pentosans

Rye flour does contain tiny amounts of gluten and gliadin but not enough to form a considerable amount of gluten in baking applications. Rye flour contains about the same amount of protein as wheat flour but the proteins have no effect on leavening. Rye flour has something else that assists leavening and structure: vegetable gums called pentosans. Pentosans absorb about 16 times their weight in water despite being about only 2 to 3 percent of the rye berry by weight. This gummyness doesn't build structure and trap air bubbles as effectively as gluten but it's still enough to make a favorable loaf. Since the bread is made from all rye flour it has a considerably complex flavor that is not obtainable with a wheat flour-based bread.
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Contributing extra darkness and flavor to the rye bread

Dark rye flour doesn't contribute to the darkness of this bread. Molasses and espresso powder instead make for a dark brown loaf while enhancing rye flavors. I've also included a touch of sugar to take some of the bitterness off the rye and caraway seeds that contribute a subtle spicy cool finish. The cream of tartar is added to increase acidity. The acidity helps round out the flavor giving the loaf a very subtle tart finish that enhances flavor. The higher acid content also deactivates the amylose enzymes from breaking out too much sugars from the starch which would make the bread excessively gummy.

This loaf is considerably denser and flavorful than breads made with wheat flour. It will proof like a wheat bread into a beautiful dome but then shrink down almost to its original size when baked which is normal in this particular recipe.

Find more Rye recipes on Veganbaking.net.

100 Percent Rye Bread Recipe

1 ¾ cups + 3 Tablespoons warm water
2 ¼ teaspoons, or one ¼ ounce package active dry yeast

4 cups dark rye flour
1 ¾ teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon cream of tartar (optional)

3 Tablespoons molasses
1 Tablespoon sugar
2 teaspoons caraway seeds
½ teaspoon espresso powder

1) Activate the yeast

In a small mixing bowl, whisk together the warm water and yeast. Allow the mixture to sit for about 10 minutes so the yeast activates.

2) Whisk together the dry ingredients

In a medium mixing bowl whisk together the dark rye flour, salt and cream of tartar until well incorporated.

3) Whisk together the flavor building ingredients

In another medium mixing bowl, whisk together the molasses, sugar, caraway seeds, espresso powder and stir until just combined. Whisk in the warm water and yeast mixture from Step 1.

4) Mix the dough

Add the dry ingredients to the bowl containing the wet ingredients and mix with a wooden spoon in one circular direction for 1 minute. Now stir in the opposite direction for 1 minute.

5) Coat the rye dough with oil

Add about 1 Tablespoon olive oil to another medium mixing bowl and spread it around the inside with your fingers. Use a spatula to scrape the dough into the oily bowl. With dampened fingers, form the dough into a ball and rotate it around in the inside of the bowl so it's coated in oil.

Form the dough into a ball

6) Let the dough rise

Cover the bowl with a plastic bag and let it rise in a warm place until it's doubled in size, about 1 ½ hours. Alternatively, place in the refrigerator for about 12 to 24 hours. Remember that we want our dough to double in size regardless of whether it spends a full 24 hours in the refrigerator or rises at room temperature. Feel free to let it rise in the refrigerator for some of the time and outside of the refrigerator the rest of the time.

Let the rye dough rise until it's doubled in size

7) Let the dough rise once more

Degass the dough by pressing on it with dampened hands several times until no more gas comes out of the dough. Form the dough into a ball again and let it rise until it's doubled in size, about 1 ½ hours. If you did your last rise in the refrigerator, do this rise at room temperature and allow 4 hours of rise time.

8) Proof the dough

The dough can now be proofed by gently forming it into a lightly oiled loaf pan and allowed to sit covered with a plastic bag until it reaches about 80% to 90% of it's intended size, which should be about 40 minutes. The proofing stage is where the dough takes most of it's shape. It's important to leave room under the plastic bag so the dough can rise sufficiently.

9) Bake the rye bread to perfection

Preheat your oven to 375F (191C). Remove the plastic bag so the dough can rest for about 10 minutes while your oven is preheating. During the baking process, the dough will rise another 10% to 20% of it's intended size in the process known as 'oven spring'. Bake until the internal temperature of the bread measured with an instant-read thermometer registers 200-210F (93-99C). Rotate the loaf 180 degrees in the oven halfway through the baking duration for even baking. If you don't have a thermometer, this is about 40 to 45 minutes or until the bottom of the loaf sounds hollow when the loaf pan is tapped with a blunt object like a rolling pin.

10) Let the bread cool completely

Since this rye bread isn't bound together with gluten we need to wait until it cools completely before removing it from the loaf pan so the vegetable gums can solidify. For best results when slicing this bread, use a designated serrated bread knife and clean the gummy dough off the blade after every three slices. This bread is best stored covered in a cool dark place or pre-sliced and stored in a plastic freezer bag in the freezer. This recipe makes one loaf of 100 Percent Rye Bread.

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Thu, 09 Jun 2011 22:33:18 -0400
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/yeasted-enriched-breads/easy-rye-bread <![CDATA[Easy Vegan Rye Bread]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/yeasted-enriched-breads/easy-rye-bread Easy Rye BreadA tough of sugar takes the edge off the bitterness of the rye in this Easy Vegan Rye Bread recipe. Molasses has been added to increase the overall richness of the rye flavor and caraway seeds adds an interesting layer subtle spicy cool to the loaf. Feel free to experiment with these additions and change them if you prefer. The loaf will still turn out roughly the same.

Initially I was intrigued by the flavor of rye breads but intimidated by baking them. How was I supposed to bake flavorful, crusty loafs with most of the leavening-enhancing gluten out of the picture? A little research found that although rye flour contains about the same amount of protein than regular flour, most of this protein isn't from glutenin and gliadin, the two protein compounds that unravel and combine to create gluten when water is added and the mixture is kneaded. What rye flour does contain though are natural gums called pentosans which absorb about 16 times their weight in water. This is the puzzle piece of how these breads are crafted. {loadposition share}Easy Rye Bread

A tough of sugar takes the edge off the bitterness of the rye in this Easy Vegan Rye Bread recipe. Molasses has been added to increase the overall richness of the rye flavor and caraway seeds adds an interesting layer subtle spicy cool to the loaf. Feel free to experiment with these additions and change them if you prefer. The loaf will still turn out roughly the same.

Initially I was intrigued by the flavor of rye breads but intimidated by baking them. How was I supposed to bake flavorful, crusty loafs with most of the leavening-enhancing gluten out of the picture? A little research found that although rye flour contains about the same amount of protein than regular flour, most of this protein isn't from glutenin and gliadin, the two protein compounds that unravel and combine to create gluten when water is added and the mixture is kneaded. What rye flour does contain though are natural gums called pentosans which absorb about 16 times their weight in water. This is the puzzle piece of how these breads are crafted.

The role of pentosans in rye breads

Rye berries do contain small amounts of glutenin and gliadin but just not enough to make a considerable effect in baked goods. Pentosans hydrate and swell which is a contrast to gluten which forms long sticky strands that enforce bread like rebar in concrete. These vegetable gums can become overworked extremely quickly, resulting in an excessively gummy dough that won't hold air bubbles during leavening. The pentosans in rye flour don't aid leavening as effectively as gluten does in wheat flour so I've found an optimal ratio of high-protein bread flour to rye flour so a loaf with respectable rise will still result.

Dark rye flour

Dark rye flour isn't actually dark. This loaf is slightly golden in color due to the addition of molasses. If you'd like to make a white rye then the molasses can be omitted.

Find more Rye recipes on Veganbaking.net
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Easy Vegan Rye Bread Recipe

1 ¾ cups + 3 Tablespoons warm water
2 ¼ teaspoons, or one ¼ ounce package active dry yeast

2 ½ cups bread flour
1 ½ cups dark rye flour
1 ¾ teaspoons salt

1 Tablespoon sugar
1 Tablespoon molasses
2 teaspoons caraway seeds

1) Activate the yeast

In a small mixing bowl, whisk together the warm water and yeast. Allow the mixture to sit for about 10 minutes so the yeast activates.

2) Whisk together the dry ingredients

In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the bread flour, dark rye flour and salt until well incorporated.

3) Whisk together the wet ingredients

In another medium mixing bowl, whisk together the sugar, molasses, caraway seeds and stir until just combined. Whisk in the warm water mixture from Step 1.

4) Mix the dough

Add the wet ingredients to the bowl containing the dry ingredients and stir with a wooden spoon in one circular direction for 1 minute. Now stir in the opposite direction for 1 minute.

5) Coat the ball of dough in vegetable oil

Add about 1 Tablespoon olive oil to another medium mixing bowl and spread it around the inside with your fingers. Use a spatula to scrape the dough into the oily bowl. With dampened fingers, form the dough into a ball and rotate it around in the inside of the bowl so it's coated in oil.

6) Let the dough rise

Cover the bowl with a plastic bag and let it rise in a warm place until it's doubled in size, about 1 ½ hours. Alternatively, place in the refrigerator for about 12 to 24 hours. Remember that we want our dough to double in size regardless of whether it spends a full 24 hours in the refrigerator or rises at room temperature. Feel free to let it rise in the refrigerator for some of the time and outside of the refrigerator the rest of the time.

7) Let the dough rise once more

Degass the dough by pressing on it with dampened hands several times until no more gas comes out of the dough. Form the dough into a ball again and let it rise until it's doubled in size, about 1 ½ hours. If you did your last rise in the refrigerator, do this rise at room temperature and allow 4 hours of rise time.

8) Proof the dough

The dough can now be proofed by gently forming it into a lightly oiled loaf pan and allowed to sit covered with a plastic bag until it reaches about 80% to 90% of it's intended size, which should be about 40 minutes. The proofing stage is where the dough takes most of it's shape. It's important to leave room under the plastic bag so the dough can rise sufficiently.

9) Bake to perfection

Preheat your oven to 375F (191C). Remove the plastic bag so the dough can rest for about 10 minutes while your oven is preheating. During the baking process, the dough will rise another 10% to 20% of it's intended size in the process known as oven spring. Bake until the internal temperature of the bread measured with an instant-read thermometer registers 180-190F (82-88C). Rotate the loaf 180 degrees in the oven halfway through the baking duration for even baking. If you don't have a thermometer, this is about 40 to 45 minutes or until the bottom of the loaf sounds hollow when the loaf pan is tapped with a blunt object like a rolling pin.

10) Cool the vegan rye bread completely

Since this rye bread isn't bound together with gluten we need to wait until it cools completely before removing it from the loaf pan. This bread is best stored covered in a cool dark place or pre-sliced and stored in a plastic freezer bag in the freezer. This recipe makes one loaf of Easy Vegan Rye Bread.

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Wed, 08 Jun 2011 12:08:29 -0400
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/yeasted-enriched-breads/no-knead-whole-wheat-sandwich-bread <![CDATA[Vegan No Knead Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/yeasted-enriched-breads/no-knead-whole-wheat-sandwich-bread Vegan No Knead Whole Wheat Sandwich BreadThis Vegan No Knead Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread is now my go-to vegan bread recipe because it's simple to make and is a great example of how wet doughs can create wonderfully light and spongy breads. The higher water content allows the gliadin and glutenin in the flour to align into tight gluten bonds over time so you can forget about all that kneading drama. The result is a fluffy, chewy loaf that's perfect for sandwiches. Feel free to use this bread as a starting point and substitute a ½ cup of the flour for things like wheat germ, wheat bran or oat bran. It's important to note that due to the wetness of this dough it's only suitable for baking in a loaf pan. {loadposition share}Vegan No Knead Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread

This Vegan No Knead Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread is now my go-to vegan bread recipe because it's simple to make and is a great example of how wet doughs can create wonderfully light and spongy breads. The higher water content allows the gliadin and glutenin in the flour to align into tight gluten bonds over time so you can forget about all that kneading drama. The result is a fluffy, chewy loaf that's perfect for sandwiches. Feel free to use this bread as a starting point and substitute a ½ cup of the flour for things like wheat germ, wheat bran or oat bran. It's important to note that due to the wetness of this dough it's only suitable for baking in a loaf pan.

Find more Whole wheat recipes on Veganbaking.net
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Vegan No Knead Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread Recipe

2 cups warm water
2 Tablespoons maple syrup or agave syrup
1 ½ teaspoons active dry yeast

3 ½ cups whole wheat flour
1 ¼ teaspoons salt

1) Mix the wet ingredients and activate the yeast

In a small mixing bowl, whisk together the warm water, maple syrup and yeast. Let it sit for about 10 minutes so the yeast activates.

2) Whisk together the dry ingredients

In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour and salt.

3) Mix the dough

Add the wet ingredients to the bowl containing the dry ingredients and vigorously mix with a wooden spoon in a circular motion for 1 minute. Cover the bowl with a plastic bag and let it rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 1 ½ hours.

The benefits of a cold dough fermentation

Alternatively, place the covered bowl in the refrigerator for a cold rest for about 12 to 24 hours. This method will produce more flavor because amylase enzymes in the flour will break out more sugars from the starches more effectively at lower temperatures. If you choose to use this method, factor in about a couple additional hours of extra time until the dough doubles in size. Typically after a cold rest, I leave my dough out at room temperature for about 4 hours until it doubles in size, depending on how hot my kitchen is. Since the dough will be cold, the yeast will be in a near dormant state and it will take time for everything to warm back up to room temperature to activate the yeast again. Feel free to let the dough rest in the refrigerator for some of the time and rise outside of the refrigerator the rest of the time; we want our dough to double in size regardless of whether it spends a full 24 hours in the refrigerator or rises at room temperature.

The great thing about the cold rest method is that if you want to make the dough ahead of time, or break up your bread baking into more manageable time frames, this method will allow you to do this as well as produce better tasting bread. It's a win-win!

Mix the dough with a spoon for 1 minute

After the first rise

4) Mix the dough again briefly then allow it to rise again

Vigorously mix the dough again with the wooden spoon for 30 seconds and allow it to rise once more, covered, at room temperature until doubled in size, about 1 ½ hours.

After the second rise

5) Proof your dough

Preheat your oven to 350F (177C). Stir the dough one last time for 30 seconds to degass it. The dough can now be proofed by gently forming it into a lightly oiled loaf pan and allowed to sit covered with a plastic bag until it reaches about 80% to 90% of it's intended size, which should be about 40 minutes. The proofing stage is where the dough takes most of it's shape. It's important to leave room under the plastic bag so the dough can rise sufficiently.

6) Bake the vegan bread to perfection

Remove the plastic bag so the dough can rest for about 10 minutes. Due to the high water content in the dough it may begin to spill over the sides of the loaf pan. In this case, take the edges of the dough and stretch it over the loaf to the other side, working your way around the perimeter of the loaf pan as you go. Stretching the dough over itself will also help keep the loaf in its proper shape as it bakes. Lightly dust the top of the loaf with wheat germ, wheat bran or oat bran.

During baking, the dough will rise another 10% to 20% of it's intended size in the process known as oven spring. Bake until the internal temperature of the bread registers 180-190F (82-88C) when read by an instant-read thermometer. This should be about 45 minutes. Rotate the loaf 180 degrees in the oven halfway through the baking duration for even baking.

7) Allow the bread to cool slightly before removing it from the loaf pan

Remove the bread from the loaf pan after about 30 minutes and allow to cool on a wire rack until it's cooled to room temperature. This bread is best stored covered in a cool dark place or pre-sliced and stored in a plastic freezer bag in the freezer. This recipe makes one loaf of Vegan No Knead Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread.

No Knead Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread Loaf

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Tue, 05 Oct 2010 13:20:44 -0400
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/muffins/apricot-rye-muffins-or-bread <![CDATA[Vegan Apricot Rye Muffins or Bread]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/muffins/apricot-rye-muffins-or-bread Vegan Apricot Rye MuffinsThe sweetness of apricots and the earthiness of 100% rye flour complement each other, especially when accompanied by molasses, cardamom and espresso powder in this Vegan Apricot Rye Muffin recipe. Rye flour contains a low amount of gluten compared to wheat based flour so in order to enhance binding, the batter is mixed for 1 minute to allow the starches in the flour to become activated. The pectin in the apricot preserves also acts wonderfully as a binder in these vegan muffins. {loadposition share}Vegan Apricot Rye Muffins

The sweetness of apricots and the earthiness of 100% rye flour complement each other, especially when accompanied by molasses, cardamom and espresso powder in this Vegan Apricot Rye Muffin or Bread recipe. Rye flour contains a low amount of gluten compared to wheat based flour so in order to enhance binding, the batter is mixed for 1 minute to allow the starches in the flour to become activated. The pectin in the apricot preserves also acts wonderfully as a binder in these vegan muffins.

Find more Rye recipes on Veganbaking.net

Vegan Apricot Rye Muffin Recipe

¾ cup non-dairy milk 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar

2 ¼ cups rye flour
1 ½ teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon baking soda

½ cup sugar
½ cup vegetable oil
1 Tablespoon molasses
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
½ teaspoon cardamom
½ teaspoon espresso powder

1 cup apricot preserves

12 dried apricots

1) Curdle the non-dairy milk

Preheat oven to 325F (163C). In a medium bowl, whisk together non-dairy milk and apple cider vinegar. Let sit for 10 minutes so the non-dairy milk curdles. 

2) Whisk together the dry ingredients

In a large mixing bowl whisk together the rye flour, baking powder and baking soda. Set aside.

3) Whisk together the flavor building ingredients

In a medium mixing bowl whisk together the sugar, vegetable oil, molasses, cinnamon, salt, vanilla extract, cardamom and espresso powder until well incorporated.

4) Mix the muffin batter

Pour the wet ingredients into the bowl containing the dry ingredients and mix with an electric mixer for 1 minute. Now add the apricot preserves mix for an additional 30 seconds.  

5) Bake to perfection

To make muffins

Line a muffin pan with cupcake liners.  Pour the batter into the muffin pan making sure the dough is filled up to the top of the pan and domed. Top each muffin with a dried apricot. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean.

To make bread

Pour the batter into a lightly oiled 8 x 4 inch loaf pan. Top the loaf with 2 rows of 6 dried apricots. Bake for 55 minutes to 1 hour or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean. This recipe makes about 6 to 8 Vegan Apricot Rye Muffins.

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Fri, 16 Jul 2010 06:19:46 -0400
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/yeasted-enriched-breads/wild-yeasted-wheat-bread <![CDATA[Wild Yeasted Wheat Bread]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/yeasted-enriched-breads/wild-yeasted-wheat-bread Vegan Wild Yeasted Wheat BreadThis Wild Yeasted Wheat Bread recipe, also known as sourdough bread uses a wild yeast sponge to leaven the dough, creating a multitude of complex flavor compounds in the process. Be sure to read and cultivate your wild yeast starter and sponge before starting this vegan bread. Sandwich breads baked in loaf pans are usually baked at lower temperatures around 350F (177C) to 375F (191C) and 'enriched' with things like sweeteners, oil and extra salt. Artisan breads formed and baked without loaf pans are baked at higher temperatures around 400F (204C) to 475F (246C) where the heat allows extra flavors to be developed. Taking this into account, your bread recipe and baking process will be slightly different depending on which method you choose. This recipe gives you options for both styles. {loadposition share}Vegan Wild Yeasted Wheat Bread

This Wild Yeasted Wheat Bread recipe, also known as sourdough bread uses a wild yeast sponge to leaven the dough, creating a multitude of complex flavor compounds in the process. Be sure to read and cultivate your wild yeast starter and sponge before starting this vegan bread. Sandwich breads baked in loaf pans are usually baked at lower temperatures around 350F (177C) to 375F (191C) and 'enriched' with things like sweeteners, oil and extra salt. Artisan breads formed and baked without loaf pans are baked at higher temperatures around 400F (204C) to 475F (246C) where the heat allows extra flavors to be developed. Taking this into account, your bread recipe and baking process will be slightly different depending on which method you choose. This recipe gives you options for both styles.

Find more Wild-yeasted recipes on Veganbaking.net

Wild Yeasted Wheat Bread Recipe

1 wild yeast sponge (1 cup wild yeast starter + 1 cup bread flour, whole wheat flour or all-purpose flour + 1 cup water)

2 cups bread flour, whole wheat flour or all-purpose flour
2 Tablespoons agave syrup or maple syrup (if making sandwich bread)
1 Tablespoon vegetable oil
1 teaspoon salt (1 ¼ teaspoons salt if making sandwich bread)

Bread Wash

1 Tablespoon non-dairy milk
1 Tablespoon agave syrup, maple syrup, barley malt syrup or brown rice syrup

1) Make Your Dough

To recap on the wild yeast starter and sponge process, first we made our starter, then mixed together  1 cup starter, 1 cup water and 1 cup flour. We then allowed it to sit from 4 to 12 hours until it increased in size between 50% and 100%. We now are going to build it into our main bread dough.

Transfer your wild yeast sponge to a large mixing bowl and mix in the bread flour, whole wheat flour or all-purpose flour and vegetable oil (the bread pictured was made with 100% whole wheat). If you're making sandwich bead in a loaf pan you'll want to bake at a lower temperature to make a softer crust. These lower temperatures aren't going to enable as much flavor compounds to be developed from the flour so you'll want to add other flavor enhancers like the specified amount of agave syrup or maple syrup and salt.

The dough's optimal consistency is for it to be just wet enough so that it can be kneaded by hand without sticking to your fingers. Since varying environmental factors will affect the moistness of the dough, you may need to add additional water in order for the dough to be at this optimal consistency. If you need to add water to the dough during kneading, flatten it into a disc and make a small indentation in the middle. Add 1 Tablespoon of water and fold the dough over and push it down so the dough is flattened again. Then fold over the dough again and push to flatten. Do this a couple more times then begin kneading as normal.

2) Knead The Dough

Knead the dough for 12 to 15 minutes on a clean, lightly floured surface. If using an electric mixer, mix for 4 minutes with a 5 to 10 minute rest, followed by another 4 minute mix. Your dough is mixed sufficiently when it's gluten is fully developed. This is indicated by making an indentation on the dough ball with your finger and seeing the dough push the indentation back.

3) Allow The Dough To Rise

Coat the dough with a small amount of oil, cover with a plastic bag or a moist towel and allow it to rise for 4 to 12 hours, or until the dough has roughly doubled in size. This rise is known as a primary fermentation. Alternatively, it can sit covered in the refrigerator for 12 to 24 hours or until it doubles in size. Our primary goal is to get the dough to roughly double in size so it doesn't matter if a portion of this time the dough is spent in the refrigerator or at room temperature. Knowing this, it's easier to plan bread baking around your schedule, especially wild yeast bread baking which often takes several days. Sometimes I'll move the dough from room temperature to the refrigerator several times during he primary fermentation and proofing stages depending on how busy I get with other things. When it's done rising do not degass the dough by squeezing the gasses out of it; we'll want to maintain the rise as much as possible and handle it extremely carefully from now on.

4) Proof The Dough

The dough can now be gently formed into it's designated mold and allowed to sit, covered with a plastic bag for another 2 to 3 hours as part of the proofing stage or secondary fermentation. The proofing stage is where the dough takes most of it's shape. It's important to leave room under the plastic bag so the dough can rise sufficiently. As an alternative to the 2 to 3 hour proofing stage, the dough can be 'retarded' by placing it in the refrigerator overnight then removed and allowed to sit for about 4 hours to get back to room temperature before going into the oven. This will allow for a more flavorful loaf, as the yeasts extract and break down starches in the flour and convert them into sugars which will then get caramelized during baking.

Proof your dough until it reaches 80% to 90% of it's intended size. The other 10% to 20% rise comes from when it's baked which is known as “oven spring”. Oven spring is less significant in wild yeasted breads than it is in breads leavened with commercial yeasts. This is likely due to commercial yeasts being specifically designed to leaven bread used in larger quantities in the loaf. Proofing time will vary depending on the temperature of your kitchen. Every 17F (8C) above or below 70F (21C) halves or doubles the proofing time.

5) Apply Bread Wash

A bread wash is a liquid that's applied to the top of a bread loaf that allows the crust to brown and extra flavor compounds to be developed in what is known as the Maillard reaction. The bread wash allows the sugars to caramelize which induces this browning.

In a small bowl whisk together the non-dairy milk and agave syrup, maple syrup, brown rice syrup or barley malt syrup until well incorporated. Using a pastry brush, liberally coat the top of the bread with the mixture. Feel free to sprinkle rolled oats or other small grains on top of the loaf. The bread wash also has the benefit of allowing these to stick to the crust.

If you're baking this bread at 400F (204C) or higher (and not baking in a loaf pan) it's recommended that you score the bread. This can be done with a sharp paring knife, razor blade or with a designated bread baking blade, also known as a french lame. Score the top of the dough diagonally. Scoring allows the bread to rise more easily due to allowing trapped steam to escape.

6) Prepare Your Oven

If baking sandwich bread in a loaf pan

Heat your oven to 375F (191C) and remove the plastic bag covering the bread dough about 10 minutes before baking.  Bake for until the internal temperature of the dough is 180-190F (82-88C) which should take about 45 minutes.  Rotate the loaf 180 degrees in the oven halfway through the baking duration for even baking.

If baking artisan bread not in a loaf pan

Artisan breads (not including sandwich loaf bread) rely on about 80% of their success on their dough and 20% of their success to how they're baked in an oven. This is in contrast to regular baking which involves about 95% of it's success to it's ingredients and preparation and 5% to how it's baked in the oven. This means that how you bake your bread can often make a big impact on the final outcome of the loaf. With breads that are baked at 400F (204C) or higher It's important to do a few things in your oven to encourage steam so the crust doesn't harden and 'lock' the dough underneath and keep it from rising.

Heat your oven to 500F (260C) and remove the plastic bag covering the bread dough about 10 minutes before baking. Place a metal baking dish filled with about an inch of near-boiling water on the bottom rack. This will create steam which will reduce the amount of your bread's crust from prematurely crisping and inhibiting rising. Right before placing your bread in the preheated oven, create a blast of steam: Fill a spray bottle with water and spray the back and sides of the inside of the oven, taking extra care not to spray any glass oven windows or lights that may shatter from the cooler water. Immediately after creating this steam, close the oven door for 30 seconds. Repeat this steaming step two more times then turn the oven heat down to 450F (232C). Bake for until the internal temperature of the dough is 200-210F (93-99C) when measured with an instant-read thermometer. This should take about 25 to 30 minutes. Rotate the loaf 180 degrees in the oven halfway through the baking duration for even baking.

This bread is best stored covered in a cool dark place or pre-sliced and stored in a plastic freezer bag in the freezer. This recipe makes one loaf of Wild Yeasted Wheat Bread.

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Sat, 17 Apr 2010 22:03:34 -0400
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/quick-breads/oatmeal-whole-wheat-quick-bread <![CDATA[Vegan Oatmeal Whole Wheat Quick Bread]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/quick-breads/oatmeal-whole-wheat-quick-bread Vegan Oatmeal Whole Wheat Quick BreadI veganized this Oatmeal Whole Wheat Quick Bread from a recipe found here. All I can say is WOW! Moist, full of texture, earthy and oh so delicious. Vegan Oatmeal Whole Wheat Quick Bread

I veganized this Oatmeal Whole Wheat Quick Bread from a recipe found here. All I can say is WOW! Moist, full of texture, earthy and oh so delicious.

Find more Healthy recipes on Veganbaking.net

Vegan Oatmeal Whole Wheat Quick Bread Recipe

1 cup rolled oats
1 cup whole wheat flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt (I like salt)

1 ½ Tablespoons agave syrup
1 Tablespoon vegetable oil
1 cup soy milk

1)
Preheat oven to 450F (232C). Grind oatmeal in a food processor or blender.

2)
In a large bowl, combine oatmeal, flour, baking powder and salt. In a separate bowl, dissolve agave syrup in vegetable oil then stir in the soy milk. Combine both mixtures and stir until a soft dough is formed. Form the dough into a ball and place on a lightly oiled baking sheet.

3)
Bake in preheated oven for about 20 minutes, or until bottom of loaf sounds hollow when tapped. 
This recipe makes one loaf of Vegan Oatmeal Whole Wheat Quick Bread.

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Thu, 08 Apr 2010 03:30:49 -0400
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/muffins/carrot-cake-muffins-or-bread <![CDATA[Vegan Carrot Cake Muffins or Bread]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/muffins/carrot-cake-muffins-or-bread Vegan Carrot Cake Muffins or Bread Carrot cake is my all-time favorite dessert so I adapted it into a heartier quick bread in the form of this Vegan Carrot Cake Muffin recipe so I could justify having it for breakfast. It's pointless to resist carrot cake goodness in it's new quick bread form so don't even try. A dollop of almond butter on top contrasts nicely with carrot cake flavor and adds extra nutritious oomph to power your day of world domination. {loadposition share}Vegan Carrot Cake Muffins or Bread

Carrot cake is my all-time favorite dessert so I adapted it into a heartier quick bread in the form of this Vegan Carrot Cake Muffin recipe so I could justify having it for breakfast. It's pointless to resist carrot cake goodness in it's new quick bread form so don't even try. A dollop of almond butter on top contrasts nicely with carrot cake flavor and adds extra nutritious oomph to power your day of world domination.

Find more Soy-free recipes on Veganbaking.net
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Vegan Carrot Cake Muffin Recipe

1 cup non-dairy milk
1 ½ teaspoons apple cider vinegar

1 ¾ cups whole wheat flour      
½ cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon non-aluminum baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda

1 ½ cups grated carrot (about 4)
¾ cup chopped pineapple, drained
¾ cup raisins
½ cup chopped walnuts

¾ cup + 2 Tablespoons sugar
½ cup vegetable oil
2 Tablespoons molasses
1 ½ teaspoons vanilla extract
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon nutmeg
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon cardamom

1) Curdle the non-dairy milk

Preheat your oven to 325F (163C). In a small bowl, whisk together non-dairy milk and apple cider vinegar. Let sit for about 10 minutes so the non-dairy milk curdles.  

2) Whisk together the dry ingredients

In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, all-purpose flour, baking powder, baking soda and set aside.

3) Add your carrots, pineapple, raisins and walnuts

Grate the carrots and add them to a small bowl. Add the chopped pineapple, raisins and walnuts.

4) Whisk together your flavor building ingredients

In another large mixing bowl whisk together the sugar, vegetable oil, vanilla extract, cinnamon, nutmeg, salt and cardamom. Now whisk in the non-dairy milk mixture from step 1.

5) Build your vegan muffin batter

Pour the wet ingredients into the bowl containing the dry ingredients and mix until just incorporated. Stir in the shredded carrots, pineapple, raisins and walnuts.

6) Bake to perfection

To make muffins

Line a muffin pan with cupcake liners.  Pour the batter into the muffin pan making sure the dough is filled up to the top of the pan and domed.  Bake for 25 to 30 minutes or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean.

To make bread

Pour the batter into a lightly oiled 8 x 4 inch loaf pan and bake for about 1 hour or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean.

This recipe makes 1 loaf or 6 to 8 Vegan Carrot Cake Muffins.

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Tue, 23 Feb 2010 13:44:49 -0500
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/yeasted-enriched-breads/easy-wheat-bread <![CDATA[Easy Vegan Wheat Bread]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/yeasted-enriched-breads/easy-wheat-bread Easy Vegan Wheat BreadThere's nothing quite like home made bread. This hearty Easy Vegan Wheat Bread recipe is easy to whip up if you have a few hours and it's really simple. In bread baking, longer rise cycles at lower temperatures usually result in more flavor compounds that are generated due to the yeast extracting and break down more starches in the flour and converting them into sugars which will then get caramelized during baking. Some doughs call for an overnight rise in the refrigerator so optimum flavor can be developed. In this vegan loaf you have the option of doing an overnight slow rise in the refrigerator or a regular rise. The two first rise cycle is for the main fermentation of the dough where the yeast eats the most sugars and rises the bread with CO2. The last rise is called proofing in where the dough rises after it's been molded into it's desired shape or placed in it's specific mold. {loadposition share}Easy Vegan Wheat Bread

There's nothing quite like home made bread. This hearty Easy Vegan Wheat Bread recipe is easy to whip up if you have a few hours and it's really simple. In bread baking, longer rise cycles at lower temperatures usually result in more flavor compounds that are generated due to the yeast extracting and break down more starches in the flour and converting them into sugars which will then get caramelized during baking. Some doughs call for an overnight rise in the refrigerator so optimum flavor can be developed. In this vegan loaf you have the option of doing an overnight slow rise in the refrigerator or a regular rise. The two first rise cycle is for the main fermentation of the dough where the yeast eats the most sugars and rises the bread with CO2. The last rise is called proofing in where the dough rises after it's been molded into it's desired shape or placed in it's specific mold.

In bread baking it's absolutely essential that no shortcuts are taken when following a recipe because you're manipulating a fermentation with very exacting tolerances; just like when brewing beer. Any deviation can result in a botched experiment, aka a brick.

Find more Whole Wheat recipes on Veganbaking.net
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Easy Vegan Wheat Bread Recipe

1 ¾ cups + 3 Tablespoons warm water
2 Tablespoons maple syrup or agave syrup
2 ¼ teaspoons, or one ¼ ounce package active dry yeast

4 cups whole wheat flour
1 ¾ teaspoons salt

1) Activate the yeast

In a small mixing bowl, whisk together the warm water, maple syrup and yeast. Let the mixture sit for about 10 minutes so the yeast activates.

2) Whisk together the dry ingredients

In a medium mixing bowl whisk together the whole wheat flour and salt.

3) Assemble the dough

Add the water mixture to the flour mixture and stir with a wooden spoon until the dough comes together into a sticky ball.

4) Knead the dough and let it rise

Transfer the dough to a clean surface. Knead for 12 to 15 minutes while adding flour only if the dough gets too sticky to work with. Form the dough into a ball and lightly coat it with oil. This will reduce the dough's tendency to dry out while it rises. Place it in a bowl, cover with a plastic bag and let it rise in a warm place until it's doubled in size, about 1 ½ hours. Alternatively, place in the refrigerator for about 12 to 24 hours. Remember that we want our dough to double in size regardless of whether it spends a full 24 hours in the refrigerator or rises at room temperature. Feel free to let it rise in the refrigerator for some of the time and outside of the refrigerator the rest of the time.

Easy Vegan Wheat Bread Dough


Easy Vegan Wheat Bread Dough Rise

5) Let the dough rise once more

Degass the dough by pressing on it with dampened hands several times until no more gas comes out of the dough. Form the dough into a ball again and let it rise until it's doubled in size, about 1 ½ hours. If you did your last rise in the refrigerator, do this rise at room temperature and allow 4 hours of rise time.

6) Proof the dough

The dough can now be proofed by gently forming it into a lightly oiled loaf pan and allowed to sit covered with a plastic bag until it reaches about 80% to 90% of it's intended size, which should be about 40 minutes. The proofing stage is where the dough takes most of it's shape. It's important to leave room under the plastic bag so the dough can rise sufficiently.

7) Bake the vegan wheat bread to perfection

Preheat your oven to 375F (191C). Remove the plastic bag so the dough can rest for about 10 minutes while your oven is preheating. During the baking process, the dough will rise another 10% to 20% of it's intended size in the process known as oven spring. Bake until the internal temperature of the bread measured with an instant-read thermometer registers 180-190F (82-88C). If you don't have a thermometer, this is about 25 to 30 minutes or until the bottom of the loaf sounds hollow when the loaf pan is tapped with a blunt object like a rolling pin.

8) Allow the bread to cool slightly

Remove the bread from the loaf pan after about 15 minutes. Allow the bread to cool on a wire rack until it's room temperature. This bread is best stored covered in a cool dark place or pre-sliced and stored in a plastic freezer bag in the freezer. This recipe makes one loaf of Easy Vegan Wheat Bread.

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Wed, 10 Feb 2010 06:02:33 -0500
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/yeasted-enriched-breads/yeasted-banana-bread <![CDATA[Yeasted Vegan Banana Bread]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/yeasted-enriched-breads/yeasted-banana-bread Yeasted Vegan Banana BreadThe more I use yeast instead of baking powder for quick breads such as Yeasted Vegan Banana Bread, the more I notice that yeasted breads produce far better flavor results. How did we get into this bad habit of chemically leavening our sweet breads with baking powder and baking soda? One word: convenience. Yeasted breads take about 3 times longer to make because we have to wait for the yeast to do it's thing. Yeast leavened breads are usually considerably more flavorful than chemically leavened breads because as the yeast ferments and spits out C02 that rises the bread, it also produces a multitude of complex flavor compounds. This is not the case with chemically leavened breads where few flavor byproducts are produced during the chemical reaction between acid and alkalne that produces the C02. Yeasted Vegan Banana Bread is now my go-to vegan banana bread recipe. {loadposition share}Yeasted Vegan Banana Bread

The more I use yeast instead of baking powder for quick breads such as Yeasted Vegan Banana Bread, the more I notice that yeasted breads produce far better flavor results. How did we get into this bad habit of chemically leavening our sweet breads with baking powder and baking soda? One word: convenience. Yeasted breads take about 3 times longer to make because we have to wait for the yeast to do it's thing. Yeast leavened breads are usually considerably more flavorful than chemically leavened breads because as the yeast ferments and spits out C02 that rises the bread, it also produces a multitude of complex flavor compounds. This is not the case with chemically leavened breads where few flavor byproducts are produced during the chemical reaction between acid and alkalne that produces the C02. Yeasted Vegan Banana Bread is now my go-to vegan banana bread recipe.

This banana bread recipe is an upgrade on the old classic and features a more complex flavor. It's slightly more time consuming to make but well worth it. This is now my go-to banana bread recipe.

Find more Banana recipes on Veganbaking.net
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Yeasted Vegan Banana Bread Recipe

½ cup non-dairy milk, warm
1 teaspoon active dry yeast

1 ¼ cups mashed over ripe bananas (about 3)
1 cup sugar
½ cup vegetable oil
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon nutmeg
1 teaspoon salt
1 ½ teaspoons vanilla extract

2 ¼ cups whole wheat flour

½ cup chopped walnuts

1) Activate the yeast

In a medium bowl, whisk together the warm non-dairy milk and yeast. Let sit for 10 minutes so the yeast activates.  

2) Prepare the bananas and whisk in the flavor building ingredients

Mash enough bananas to make 1 ¼ cups and add this to a separate large mixing bowl. Whisk in the yeast mixture, sugar, vegetable oil, cinnamon, nutmeg, salt and vanilla extract. 

3) Build the batter

Add the half of the flour to the bowl and mix with an electric mixer until just incorporated. Add the rest of the flour and mix on low speed for two minutes. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let it sit for two hours. After two hours, mix the dough for about 30 seconds. Stir in the walnuts if desired.

4) Bake the vegan banana bread to perfection

To make muffins

Line a muffin pan with cupcake liners. Pour the batter into the muffin pan making sure the dough is filled up to the top of the pan and domed. Preheat oven to 325F (163C). Let the muffins sit for 1 ½ hours with a bowl inverted over the top of the muffin pan to keep the dough from drying out. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean.

To make bread

Pour the batter into a lightly oiled 8 x 4 inch loaf pan. Preheat oven to 325F (163C). Cover the loaf pan with plastic wrap and let it sit for 1 ½ hours. Bake for about 1 hour or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean.

This recipe makes one loaf or 6 to 8 muffins of Yeasted Vegan Banana Bread.

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Fri, 01 Jan 2010 01:24:55 -0500
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/yeasted-enriched-breads/vegan-everything-bagels <![CDATA[Vegan Everything Bagels]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/yeasted-enriched-breads/vegan-everything-bagels Vegan Everything BagelsI know that one day I won't have access to my favorite bagel place on Bedford ave in Brooklyn on my way home from the bars to grab a late night snack. This Vegan Everything Bagel recipe will hopefully keep me content in those times. Enjoy these vegan bagels with Tofutti cream cheese, Creamy Vegan Cashew Cream Cheese, my more involved Vegan Cashew Cream Cheese or whatever else floats your fancy. I've designed these bagels in the authentic NY style which uses barley malt, also known as malted barley. Barley malt is highly recommended but if you don't have it just use an additional one-half Tablespoon sugar in its place. Be sure to allow ample time for this recipe- it takes about two hours. If you live further than two hours away from New York City, this recipe will be easier than flying there for the flavor. {loadposition share}Vegan Everything Bagels

I know that one day I won't have access to my favorite bagel place on Bedford ave in Brooklyn on my way home from the bars to grab a late night snack. This Vegan Everything Bagel recipe will hopefully keep me content in those times. Enjoy these vegan bagels with Tofutti cream cheese, Creamy Vegan Cashew Cream Cheese, my more involved Vegan Cashew Cream Cheese or whatever else floats your fancy. I've designed these bagels in the authentic NY style which uses barley malt, also known as malted barley. Barley malt is highly recommended but if you don't have it just use an additional one-half Tablespoon sugar in its place. Be sure to allow ample time for this recipe- it takes about two hours. If you live further than two hours away from New York City, this recipe will be easier than flying there for the flavor.

Find more Low-sugar recipes on Veganbaking.net
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Vegan Everything Bagel Recipe

2 ¼ teaspoons active dry yeast (¼ ounce)
1 2/3 cups warm water

4 ½ cups bread flour

1 Tablespoon sugar
1 Tablespoon barley malt syrup
2 teaspoons salt
1 ½ teaspoons onion powder
1 teaspoon garlic powder

about 3 quarts of water
2 Tablespoons sugar

sesame seeds
poppy seeds
caraway seeds
salt

1) Activate the yeast

In a medium size mixing bowl whisk together the yeast and warm water. Let it sit for about 10 minutes so the yeast activates.

2) Prepare the bread flour

In another medium mixing bowl, add the bread flour. 

3) Build the dough

Add the yeast mixture and the sugar, barley malt syrup, salt, onion powder and garlic powder to the bowl containing the flour and mix with a spoon in a circular motion. When the dough becomes thick mix with your hands and knead on a clean non stick dough mat or a lightly floured surface. Knead until the dough springs back when poked with your finger, which should be after about 12 to 15 minutes of kneading. Feel free to add light dustings of flour if the dough gets too sticky to work with. 

4) Allow the dough to rise

Preheat your oven to 425F (218C). Form the dough into a ball and cover it with a plastic bag or plastic wrap and let it sit for about 45 minutes.

5) Prepare the water

In a large pot, add the 3 quarts of water and the 2 Tablespoons sugar. Place over high heat until it boils then reduce heat until it simmers: you'll need it for step 7.

6) Give the dough a final knead, divide and roll into bagels

Give the dough one last knead for 2 minutes.

At this point the dough can either be used immediately or covered in plastic wrap and refrigerated for up to a few weeks. If you're using it later, make sure the dough is room temperature before removing it from the plastic wrap and forming it into shape.

Divide the dough into 10 pieces. Roll each piece into a 9 to 10 inch cylinder. Moisten the ends with water and form the cylinders into a bagel shape by overlapping the ends by about one inch. Place the bagels on a parchment covered baking sheet, cover with a clean moist towel and let them rest for about 10 minutes.

7) Add the bagels to the simmering water to create their gelatinized starch skin

Place the bagels, 5 at a time, into the pot of simmering water from step 6. Keep the bagels in the simmering water for 30 seconds, then turn and simmer for another 30 seconds. Place the bagels back on a rack for a few minutes to drain. Immediately sprinkle the bagels with sesame seeds, poppy seeds, caraway seeds, salt and transfer them to a parchment paper lined cookie sheet. After the bagels have been dusted with your desired toppings they can be carefully adjusted into their perfect round shape if necessary. Repeat this procedure for the rest of the dough.

8) Bake the bagels to perfection

Bake for about 15 minutes or until the crust is golden. When the bagels are removed from the oven, transfer them to a cooling rack cool cookie sheet so they stop cooking. This recipe makes 10 Vegan Everything Bagels.

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Wed, 25 Mar 2009 12:05:29 -0400
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/muffins/blueberry-beetnik-muffins-or-bread <![CDATA[Vegan Blueberry Beetnik Muffins or Bread]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/muffins/blueberry-beetnik-muffins-or-bread Vegan Blueberry Beetnik Muffins or Bread This Vegan Blueberry Beetnik Muffin recipe takes advantage of baked beets which harbor wonderful butter caramel flavors when their sugars caramelize. The vegan muffins are then complimented by the tartness of blueberries and just the right ratio of whole wheat flour and all-purpose flour. Lemon juice enhances flavor while allowing the beet purée to retain its vibrant reddish color during baking. This is because acids reduce the oxidation of plant-based compounds called anthocyanins, which are responsible for the red color in foods like beets and raspberries. {loadposition share}Vegan Blueberry Beetnik Muffins or Bread

This Vegan Blueberry Beetnik Muffin recipe takes advantage of baked beets which harbor wonderful butter caramel flavors when their sugars caramelize. The vegan muffins are then complimented by the tartness of blueberries and just the right ratio of whole wheat flour and all-purpose flour. Lemon juice enhances flavor while allowing the beet purée to retain its vibrant reddish color during baking. This is because acids reduce the oxidation of plant-based compounds called anthocyanins, which are responsible for the red color in foods like beets and raspberries.

Find more Blueberry recipes on Veganbaking.net

Vegan Blueberry Beetnik Muffins Recipe

1 ¼ cups beet puree (about 2 beets)

3 Tablespoons non-dairy milk
2 Tablespoons lemon juice

1 ¾ cups whole wheat flour
½ cup all-purpose flour
1 ½ teaspoons non-aluminum baking powder
½ teaspoon baking soda

½ cup vegetable oil
¾ cup sugar
1 ½ teaspoons vanilla extract
1 teaspoon salt

1 cup blueberries, fresh

1) Bake your beets

Preheat oven to 400F (204C). Chop 2 beets into 1 inch pieces and place them in a glass or ceramic casserole dish. Cover the dish with tin foil and poke about 6 small slits so steam can escape. Bake for 40 minutes. Puree in a food processor or blender until smooth. Measure out 1 ¼ cups and save the rest for future food projects. Reduce oven heat to 325F (163C).

Beets

2) Curdle your non-dairy milk

In a small bowl, whisk together the non-dairy milk and lemon juice. Set aside for about 10 minutes so the non-dairy milk curdles. 

3) Whisk together the dry ingredients

In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, all-purpose flour, baking powder and baking soda.

4) Whisk together the flavor building ingredients

In another large bowl whisk together the the non-dairy milk and lemon juice mixture, vegetable oil, sugar, vanilla extract, salt and the beet purée.

5) Build the batter

Add the wet ingredients to the bowl containing the dry ingredients and mix with a spoon until well incorporated. Due to moisture variations of the beets, more non-dairy milk or flour may need to be added to achieve the desired dough thickness. The dough should be very thick.

6) Bake to perfection

To make muffins

Line a muffin tin with cupcake liners. The blueberries will cause the muffins to stick to the tin if cupcake liners aren't used. Pour the batter into the muffin tin making sure the dough is filled up to the top of the pan and domed. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean.

To make bread

Pour the batter into a lightly oiled 8 x 4 inch loaf pan and bake for about 1 hour or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean. This recipe makes about 1 loaf or 6 to 8 Vegan Blueberry Beetnik Muffins.

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Sun, 09 Mar 2008 21:05:49 -0400
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/muffins/english-muffins <![CDATA[Vegan English Muffins]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/breads/enriched-breads/muffins/english-muffins Vegan English MuffinsThis Vegan English Muffin recipe features just a touch of lemon juice and sugar to enhance its yeast-induced flavors. They're awesome fresh out of the toaster with a little Vegan Butter, jam or whatever your preferred muffin topping is. I've been known to use these as burger buns too. They're not loaded with preservatives and dough conditioners like their store-bought cousins but they'll still keep in the freezer stored in a plastic freezer bag for several months. {loadposition share}Vegan English Muffins

This Vegan English Muffin recipe features just a touch of lemon juice and sugar to enhance its yeast-induced flavors. They're awesome fresh out of the toaster with a little Vegan Butter, jam or whatever your preferred muffin topping is. I've been known to use these as burger buns too. They're not loaded with preservatives and dough conditioners like their store-bought cousins but they'll still keep in the freezer stored in a plastic freezer bag for several months.

Find more Low-sugar recipes on Veganbaking.net

Vegan English Muffin Recipe

¼ oz active dry yeast (1 packet)
1 cup very warm water (but not hot)

3 cups all-purpose flour

1 Tablespoon sugar
1 Tablespoon lemon juice
2 Tablespoons vegetable oil
1 teaspoon salt

1) Activate the yeast

Preheat your oven to 400F (204C). In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the very warm water and the yeast for about a minute. Temperature is important because if the water is too hot, the yeast will die and if the water is too cool, the yeast won’t get activated. 

2) Aerate your flour

In a large mixing bowl, add the flour and whisk it for a few seconds to aerate it. 

3) Whisk together the flavor building ingredients then build the dough

In a small mixing bowl, whisk together the sugar, lemon juice, vegetable oil and salt. Quickly whisk this into the yeast water mixture, and add the contents of the bowl to the bowl containing the dry ingredients. Mix with a wooden spoon until just incorporated, then use your hands to knead the dough for no less than 5 minutes. It may be necessary to add a couple sprinkles of flour if the dough is too wet or a splash of water if the dough is too dry but be extremely careful to not add too much. If your bowl is big enough you can knead the dough inside the bowl.  If your bowl is too small, knead the dough on a clean, lightly floured surface.

4) Allow the dough to rise

Place the dough ball back inside the large mixing bowl, cover with a plastic grocery bag, and let it sit on top of the oven for 45 minutes or until the dough doubles in size. After the dough doubles in size, place it on a clean, lightly floured surface and pat the dough into a ½ inch thick circle.

5) Cut the vegan biscuits to size then bake to perfection

Use a 3 inch biscuit cutter or a mug to cut the dough into english muffins. Place the muffins on a non-stick or lightly oiled baking sheet. Depress the center of each muffin with your thumb so they will not dome when baking. Bake for 10 minutes or until golden brown. This recipe makes about 10 Vegan English Muffins.

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Mon, 03 Mar 2008 06:34:57 -0500