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<![CDATA[Vegan Cookie Recipes]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/ <![CDATA[Vegan Cookie Recipes]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/images/stories/logo.png http://www.veganbaking.net/ http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/buttery-vegan-shortbread-cookies <![CDATA[Buttery Vegan Shortbread Cookies]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/buttery-vegan-shortbread-cookies Buttery Vegan Shortbread CookiesThere’s just something about buttery shortbread that’s otherworldly. How does that rich, savory-sweet, toastiness, sweep into your palate with buttery wave after buttery wave? How does it exist with such a crispy texture? That snap when you bite into it unleashes a lingering aroma that takes over you and lets you know that you’ve arrived. Everything is going to be okay now. As long as you don’t hog all the shortbread.

I’m pretty picky about my shortbread. I believe it should be a celebration of the flavor of butter. Any other flavors present need only be there to play a supporting role. As you bite in, it should yield with a snap and infuse the senses with buttery richness. But this is vegan baking. How do you do all these things as well as showcase butter? {loadposition share}Buttery Vegan Shortbread Cookies

There’s just something about buttery shortbread that’s otherworldly. How does that rich, savory-sweet, toastiness, sweep into your palate with buttery wave after buttery wave? How does it exist with such a crispy texture? That snap when you bite into it unleashes a lingering aroma that takes over you and lets you know that you’ve arrived. Everything is going to be okay now. As long as you don’t hog all the shortbread.

I’m pretty picky about my shortbread. I believe it should be a celebration of the flavor of butter. Any other flavors present need only be there to play a supporting role. As you bite in, it should yield with a snap and infuse the senses with buttery richness. But this is vegan baking. How do you do all these things as well as showcase butter?
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Bringing out the butter with vegan shortbread

This sounds all well and good, but how are you supposed to obtain these characteristics in vegan shortbread? For years I didn’t even try and just lowered the bar, tricking myself into thinking that regular vegan shortbread that adopts store-bought margarine did the job just fine.

Regular Vegan Butter

After I began experimenting with Vegan Butter, I decided to delve into the oily art of butter-infused desserts. After a few years of experimenting and reading up on shortbread food science, I learned that coconut oil provided an extra layer of buttery notes when baked into dry, crispy desserts. How could this be? Well, when coconut is combined with flour and the other components in Vegan Butter, magic happens and intense butter flavor is enhanced as the flour toasts during baking. You'll just have to taste this to see what I mean. One of the other factors driving this flavor development is due to coconut oil containing flavor compounds called lactones. These are among the same flavor compounds that give cream its signature flavor and aroma.

Find more Coconut recipes on Veganbaking.net

While baking, the coconut notes combine with the toastiness of all-purpose flour to provide a surprisingly substantial amount of savory, butteriness. I then began experimenting with Vegan Butter variations. I found that Regular Vegan Butter with refined coconut oil swapped out for unrefined coconut oil provided most of what I was looking for. But the texture of the shortbread was crumbling, along with my sanity. After considerable recipe testing I was in dire straits and badly in need of finding a way to optimize the texture for a suitable crispy mouthfeel.

Understanding traditional shortbread

The shortbread I kept making just wouldn’t stay together. It was retaining too much moisture and falling apart. Morale was falling. When I increased the water-based ingredients, it would get softer after baking. When I reduced the water-based ingredients, it would just turn to dust.

What makes shortbread with dairy-based butter stay together and shortbread with Vegan Butter fall apart? To answer this question we need to take a look at how traditional dairy-butter shortbread works.

Traditional shortbread gets the short from the fact that doesn't bend or stretch; it snaps off when bent or cut. Back when shorbread got its name, bakers probably didn't know that this was because the large amounts of fat in the recipe was doing two things:
  • The fat coats glutenin and gliadin strands, the protein components that later hydrate and combine to make up gluten in the flour. Large amounts of fat makes them slippery, which reduces the chances of them making strong bonds.
  • The fat makes the glutenin and gliadin strands hydrophobic, or water repelling by coating them. These gluten precursors require water in order to form bonds. Keeping water from the gluten is desired to a certain extent, because if gluten gets a chance to take a sip, it'll drink up as much as it possibly can and hold onto lots of it during baking, contributing to a soft texture. 
This results in the gluten bonds being short and weak enough to enable a loose, crispy texture. The small amount of water contained in the butter that does get through to the gluten facilitates this. The plays a bonus role here too: Since the fat used in shortbread is solid at room temperature, after cooling, it actually contributes to a slight solidification of the shortbread.

Gluten is pretty powerful stuff and it absolutely loves water. So usually a gluten-free starch-based flour such as rice flour or cornstarch is added to displace more gluten to make sure it backs off the water supply. So the takeaway here is that, as in pie crusts, shortbread is basically all about the manipulation of gluten.

Fine tuning vegan shortbread texture

So how was my Vegan Butter contributing to my crumbly texture issue?  I decided to look into other aspects that make my Vegan Butter different than dairy-based butter.

My Vegan Butters use various ingredients to get the oil and water-based ingredients to mix well and enable a smooth creaminess. These ingredients consist of lecithin and xanthan gum. Lecithin is an emulsifier which allows oil and water to mix. Xanthan gum also has emulsification abilities, as well as holds onto air bubbles to mimic dairy-based butter’s ability to do the same. I really didn’t need Vegan Butter to hold onto air bubbles in this particular case. What if I dropped it? After all, xanthan gum is also hygroscopic, which means on a microscopic scale it's probably writing endless love letters to water. Once it gets hold of it, it just won’t seem to let it go, even after extended baking. Wait, didn't we just go through all this drama with the gluten? Deja vu!

While I'm at it, why don't I ax the lecithin as well? I'm primarily concerned about fat inhibiting gluten in this recipe. The smooth, consistently soft characteristics that lecithin imparts in Vegan Butter aren't needed here.

Once I made my custom version of Regular Vegan Butter and used it in the shortbread, I knew I was onto something! The shortbread congratulated me by snapping as I bit in. Now all I had to do was fine tune the salt to turn the butter level up to 11.

 So the takeaway here is that, as in pie crusts, shortbread is basically all about the manipulation of gluten.

Maintaining shortbread texture

As I said earlier, a crispy texture is due to lack of water in the dough. In this state the shortbread actually contains less water than the surrounding air in most cases. I recommend storing the shortbread in a relatively air-tight container at room temperature. Why? Because after they're left out on the counter for a day or so they'll actually start to pull in moisture from the surrounding air which will result in a soft, crumbly texture. The good news is that if you find your shortbread in this state, you can bring it back to crispiness by placing it in your oven set to 275F (135C) for 20 to 30 minutes.

The importance of sanding sugar

Sanding sugar, also known as sparkling sugar, consists of large sugar crystals. These crystals are larger than regular granulated white sugar crystals and they're more resistant to melting. Since their crystals are large, they tend to catch the light and shimmer like diamonds. I like to use sanding sugar where it can really be used to visually dress up an otherwise boring looking dessert. If this shortbread was baked up without anything dressing up the top, it would look rather dull. Since I want the look to match the intensity of the buttery punch, sanding sugar is a great fit here. Remember, the best food allows you to get excited about it before you even put it in your mouth! 

Sanding sugar

This vegan shortbread emphasizes buttery flavor and crispy texture. Feel free to use it as a base for other shortbread variations. You should be able to swap out the rice flour with other gluten-free starch-based flours such as cocoa powder, almond flour or even coconut flour; just make sure there are no hydrocolloids like xanthan gum hanging around. Alternative flours can help you branch out into unexplored vegan shortbread territory. Just be sure to leave the all-purpose flour intact. And no, I don't have a 100% gluten-free version of this recipe. Yet.
 TIPThis recipe includes a recipe for a custom Vegan Butter called Shortbread Vegan Butter. It's xanthan gum and lecithin-free and has more salt to amplify buttery flavors. It’s found below and absolutely required in order to get the proper texture. I usually make it a few days before I make the shortbread to make preparation as simple as possible.

Buttery Vegan Shortbread Cookie Recipe

Yield: one 8 x 8 inch square of cookies

For the Shortbread Vegan Butter

¼ cup + 2 teaspoons soy milk
½ teaspoon apple cider vinegar
½ teaspoon coconut vinegar (if you can’t find coconut vinegar, substitute with ½ teaspoon apple cider vinegar so the total is 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar)
½ + ⅛ teaspoon salt

½ cup + 2 Tablespoons + 1 teaspoon (130 grams) unrefined coconut oil, melted
1 Tablespoon canola oil, light olive oil or rice bran oil

For the shortbread

1 ½ cups + 1 Tablespoon all-purpose flour
3 Tablespoons rice flour or cornstarch
7 Tablespoons granulated white sugar
 
1 cup (2 sticks or 215 grams) Shortbread Vegan Butter, refrigerator temperature
 
2 teaspoons sanding sugar

Prepare the Shortbread Vegan Butter

1) Curdle the soy milk

Place the soy milk, apple cider vinegar, coconut vinegar and salt in a small cup and whisk together with a fork. Let it sit for about 10 minutes so the mixture curdles.

2) Mix the Vegan Butter ingredients

Melt the unrefined coconut oil in a microwave so it's barely melted and as close to room temperature as possible. Measure it and add it and the canola oil to a food processor. 
 TIPMaking smooth Vegan Butter is dependent on the mixture solidifying as quickly as possible after it's mixed. This is why it's important to make sure your coconut oil is as close to room temperature as possible before you mix it with the rest of the ingredients.

3) Transfer the Vegan Butter to a mold so it solidifies

Add the soy milk mixture to the food processor. Process for 2 minutes, scraping down the sides halfway through the duration. Pour the mixture into a mold and place it in the freezer to solidify. An ice cube mold works well. The vegan butter should be ready to use in about an hour. Store it in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 month or wrapped in plastic wrap in the freezer for up to 1 year. This recipe makes 1 cup (215 grams), or the equivalent of 2 sticks Shortbread Vegan Butter.

Vegan Butter in a mold

Learn more about Vegan Butter.

Prepare the shortbread

4) Mix your dry ingredients together

Preheat your oven to 425F (218C). If you have a food processor, add the all-purpose flour, rice flour or cornstarch, granulated white sugar and pulse 10 times. The goal here is to get all of the ingredients mixed together with no lumps.

If you don't have a food processor, place a sifter in a medium mixing bowl and place the all-purpose flour, rice flour or cornstarch, sugar and salt into it. Sift the ingredients into the mixing bowl.

Line an 8 x 8 inch square baking pan with parchment paper, leaving about an extra inch or so hanging off of either side. This excess parchment is what you’ll use to lift the shortbread out of the pan after baking. Set the baking pan aside.

8 x 8 inch baking dish

5) Cut your Vegan Butter into the dry ingredients

Cut the Shortbread Vegan Butter into ¼ inch cubes. If you used a food processor in Step 4, simply add the Vegan Butter cubes and pulse 20 times.

If you sifted, add the Vegan Butter cubes to the flour and toss the mixture with your fingers until they're well coated. Use a pastry blender to mix until the mixture resembles coarse sand.

Vegan Butter cubes

6) Bake to perfection

Press the dough in the baking pan and use the flat bottom of a drinking glass to compress the dough into place. Try to find a drinking glass that has the flattest bottom you can find. The trick is to press down on the drinking glass as much as you possibly can within reason and give it a very slight twist as you lift it off the dough so it releases without sticking. Work your way over the dough, back and forth until the dough is fully compressed and flat. This step is crucial because it presses the air out of the dough and compresses it together, ensuring it'll have a nice crisp structure after baking. Sprinkle the sanding sugar on top. Reduce your oven heat to 300F (149C) and bake for 30 minutes.

Press the dough into the baking pan

Sprinkle the top with sanding sugar

7) Cut into squares

Remove the shortbread from the oven. Using a paring knife, carefully cut your desired size of the cookies by slicing straight, through the hot dough. I usually cut into small rectangular pieces. I advise cutting pieces on the small side due to the richness of this shortbread. Alternatively, you can use a cookie cutter to cut custom shapes into the dough but keep in mind that this may result in wasted dough because you can’t roll the dough scraps into a ball and use it again like you can in other cookie styles.

Cut the shortbread

8) Continue baking your vegan shortbread

Place the shortbread back into the oven, reduce heat to 275F (135C) and bake for 1 ½ additional hours. Remove it from the oven and allow it to cool on a wire rack. This allows the shortbread to lose as much of its internal moisture as possible which ensures a crispy texture. When cool, remove the shortbread from the baking pan by lifting it out by the parchment paper.

To preserve crispiness, Buttery Vegan Shortbread should be stored in a relatively air-tight container at room temperature where it'll keep for up to 1 month.

Buttery Vegan Shortbread

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Mon, 26 Jan 2015 15:58:41 -0500
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/black-and-white-cookies <![CDATA[Vegan Black and White Cookies]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/black-and-white-cookies Vegan Black and White Cookies“I’ve never had a black and white cookie before” I mumbled to my vegan food friends, not thinking that it was that big of a deal. “Living in New York City, you’ve never had a black and white cookie?!” they desperately exclaimed. Right then, I perked up. What is it about these flat perfectly looking cookies that straddle the line between black and white so mysteriously? After all, this is New York City’s cookie. Does this cookie dare to celebrate chocolate and vanilla at the same time? What about the cookie part? Is it just a boring pseudo shortbread crust underneath or something special? I had to know more. {loadposition share}Vegan Black and White Cookies

“I’ve never had a black and white cookie before” I mumbled to my vegan food friends, not thinking that it was that big of a deal. “Living in New York City, you’ve never had a black and white cookie?!” they desperately exclaimed. Right then, I perked up. What is it about these flat perfectly looking cookies that straddle the line between black and white so mysteriously? After all, this is New York City’s cookie. Does this cookie dare to celebrate chocolate and vanilla at the same time? What about the cookie part? Is it just a boring pseudo shortbread crust underneath or something special? I had to know more.
 
Soon after trying one I learned that it in pure New York City style, it in fact does, boldly dare to celebrate chocolate and vanilla at the same time. All while sporting a light but compact cake inspired cookie with a hint of lemon that is rich enough to where it can stand up to the chocolate and vanilla. It straddles the line between cake and cookie, with the dual icings dealing a deathly blow of chocolate and vanilla intensity if you take a chance and eat right down the middle. I was hooked! 

The search for the ultimate Black and White Cookie

It wasn’t long before I integrated my quest for the ultimate black and white cookie into my search for the ultimate New York City bagel, due to most bagel stores in the city also happening to sell outstanding black and white cookies. 
 
Over the years I was able to drill down and find the aspects of the black and white cookie that I preferred most: The cookie has to be light in texture, slightly rich in flavor and soft with a hint of lemony acid but not too sweet. The icings need to complement not only each other, but the cookie too. None of the components should be the star of the show; they should all build on each other to make a memorable cookie experience. But don’t get too crazy; this cookie’s amazingness should lie in its simplicity which just happens to make you happy.
 
This vegan Black and White cookie recipe is designed to have all those traits. A touch of tapioca flour enables the batter to be extra light and perfectly moist. A specific combination of apple cider vinegar, lemon extract and vanilla extract gives this vegan cookie both richness and brightness that enables it to be on par with its traditional dairy-laden counterparts.

Find more Soy-free recipes on Veganbaking.net
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Vegan Black and White Cookie Recipe

For the cookies

2 cups non-dairy milk
1 Tablespoon apple cider vinegar
 
3 ¼ cups all-purpose flour
6 Tablespoons tapioca flour
½ teaspoon baking powder
¼ teaspoon baking soda
 
1 ¾ cups granulated white sugar
¾ cup + 2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon vanilla extract
¼ teaspoon lemon extract

For the icings

2 ounces unsweetened chocolate, chopped fine
 
¼ cup amber agave, corn or glucose syrup
5 Tablespoons + 2 teaspoons water
5 cups (650 grams) confectioners sugar
½ teaspoon vanilla extract
 
½ teaspoon water

1) Curdle the non-dairy milk

Preheat your oven to 375F (191C). Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. In a small mixing bowl, whisk together the non-dairy milk and apple cider vinegar. Set aside for about 10 minutes so the mixture curdles.

2) Whisk together the dry ingredients

In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the all-purpose flour tapioca flour, baking powder and baking soda. Set aside.

3) Whisk together the flavor building ingredients

In another medium mixing bowl, whisk together the sugar, vegetable oil, salt, vanilla extract, lemon extract and the non-dairy milk mixture from Step 1.

4) Whisk the batter together

Transfer the wet ingredients to bowl containing the dry ingredients and whisk together until well incorporated.

5) Pour the cookies out onto the baking sheet and bake to perfection

Using a dry quarter measuring cup and a dining spoon to catch drippings, scoop up the batter and pour it on the baking sheet, making sure to leave at least 1 inch between each cookie. The batter should be in a disc that’s roughly 2 ½ inches round after it’s poured onto the sheet. The batter will spread out more as you pour the rest of the cookies. Bake until the center of the cookies are firm, about 23 minutes. Rotate the baking sheets halfway throughout the baking duration.

Vegan black and white cookies before icing

6) Melt the chocolate

Make a water bath, also known as a bain marie, by placing a medium bowl over a saucepan of almost simmering water. Melt the chocolate in a the bowl while whisking frequently. Remove from the heat and set aside.

Learn how to make a double boiler or bain marie.

7) Prepare the vanilla icing

In a medium saucepan, prepare the vanilla icing by bringing the agave syrup, corn or glucose syrup and water to a boil over medium heat. Remove from heat and stir in the confectioners sugar and vanilla until well combined.

8) Prepare the chocolate icing

Transfer ¾ cup of the vanilla icing and 1 teaspoon water to the bowl with the melted chocolate and stir until well combined. If the mixture thickens, heat it up in a microwave.

Vegan black and white cookies, ready to ice

9) Glaze one half of each cookie with vanilla icing

Place 2 or 3 large wire racks on top of parchment or waxed paper. Using a small offset metal spatula, spread about 2 tablespoons of the vanilla icing on half of the underside each cookie. That's right, since the underside of the cookie is perfectly flat, we're frosting it and it now becomes the top of the cookie. Tilt the cookie and run the spatula around the edge of the cookie to scrape off excess icing. Place the cookies on the wire rack and allow the icing to harden, about 15 minutes. 
 
If the vanilla icing begins to thicken, stir in hot water, teaspoon by teaspoon, until the icing is fluid enough to coat the cookies. Alternatively, if the icing is too thin and runny, whisk in additional confectioners’ sugar, teaspoon by teaspoon, until the proper consistency is attained. 

Vegan black and white cookies glazed with vanilla icing

10) Glaze the other half of each cookie with chocolate icing

Using the spatula, spread the chocolate icing on the other half of each cookie, tilting the cookie downward and scraping away excess icing. If the chocolate icing thickens and cools, reheat it over a water bath until it's fluid enough to coat the cookies. If the icing is still too thick, stir in hot water, teaspoon by teaspoon, until the proper fluidity is reached. Place the cookies on the wire rack and allow the icings to harden, at least 1 hour. The cookies may be stored at room temperature in an airtight container, layered between sheets of parchment paper, for up to 3 days. This recipe makes about 24 to 26 Vegan Black and White Cookies.

Vegan black and white cookies glazed with chocolate icing

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Sat, 03 Aug 2013 05:19:22 -0400
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/toasted-coconut-chocolate-chip-cookies <![CDATA[Vegan Toasted Coconut Chocolate Chip Cookies]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/toasted-coconut-chocolate-chip-cookies Vegan Toasted Coconut Chocolate Chip CookiesI decided to assemble Team Coconut: an all-star team of players dedicated to bringing in some serious coconut action. Like a Quiet Riot - Bang Your Head (on the Coconut) remix. Based on my Vegan Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookie recipe, Vegan Toasted Coconut Chocolate Chip Cookies boast toasted coconut flour, unrefined coconut oil, coconut sugar and shredded coconut that toasts during baking. Let’s do this. {loadposition share}Vegan Toasted Coconut Chocolate Chip Cookies

I decided to assemble Team Coconut: an all-star team of players dedicated to bringing in some serious coconut action. Like a Quiet Riot - Bang Your Head (on the Coconut) remix. Based on my Vegan Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookie recipe, Vegan Toasted Coconut Chocolate Chip Cookies boast toasted coconut flour, unrefined coconut oil, coconut sugar and shredded coconut that toasts during baking. Let’s do this.

Infusing multiple layers of coconut into a cookie recipe

Reworking my vegan Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookie recipe into a toasted coconut version was much more difficult than I had anticipated. A couple months and many happy taste testers later I had an entirely different recipe. I say many happy taste testers because even when this recipe doesn’t turn out, it’s still just coconut, chocolate and sugar; you can’t really go wrong with that.

Did you know you can toast coconut flour and it becomes twice as good? Check it out. Below is coconut flour before toasting.

Coconut flour before toasting

Now here's coconut flour after toasting at 300F (149C) for 20 minutes, below. It makes your house smell real nice.

Coconut flour after toasting

Working with Coconut Flour

The piece of the puzzle that made this recipe so hard to master was the coconut flour. How much coconut flour should you add? It can lend a sandy mouthfeel to things like cookies and cakes when used in excess so you probably want to add just enough to where you have coconut flavor, but just before you feel like you’re eating something from the beach. 
 
Coconut flour absorbs about six times the water content of regular all-purpose flour. This means that once you find out how much coconut flour you can cram into your recipe, you’re going to need to know how much more water-based ingredients to add. Now since your recipe contains more water, you’re going to need to know how much longer you’re going to need to bake it. Oh and your recipe now has less gluten than it used to so the texture is going to be different too. Good luck with that. 

Getting gluten levels back in check for optimum texture

Less gluten normally means that you’re not going to have the chewiness you used to have. So I got around this problem by using gluten-rich bread flour instead of all-purpose flour, which increased the water requirements even more because gluten absolutely lurvs water. "Can you make these cookies gluten-free?" you might ask. Unfortunately the simple answer right now is no. It would require a complete rebuild from the ground up. A challenge which I'll probably rise to someday.
 
Unrefined coconut oil and coconut sugar is used to increase the level of coconut flavor as much as possible. It's actually still on the subtle side but if you’re a fan of chocolate chip cookies and coconut, you’re going to love these cookies. Please don’t skimp on the molasses. I use it instead of brown sugar because brown sugar is just granulated white sugar with molasses added anyway. It’s crucial to moisture retention and chewiness in cookies and it adds a subtle background richness. It’s all part of Team Coconut.

Find more Coconut recipes on Veganbaking.net
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Vegan Toasted Coconut Chocolate Chip Cookie Recipe

1 cup + 2 Tablespoons non-dairy milk
2 Tablespoons golden flax meal
½ teaspoon apple cider vinegar
 
1 ½ cups bread flour
¾ cups toasted coconut flour
¾ teaspoon salt
 
1 ½ cups + 1 Tablespoon coconut sugar or granulated white sugar
½ cup + 3 Tablespoons unrefined coconut oil, melted
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 teaspoons molasses
 
1 cup + 2 Tablespoons semisweet chocolate chips
 
1 cup shredded coconut, unsweetened

1) Toast the shredded coconut

Preheat your oven to 300F (149C). Toast your coconut flour by placing it on a rimmed baking sheet and baking it for 20 minutes. Set the toasted coconut flour aside. Feel free to find out more information on toasting coconut flour. If you’re working with toasted coconut flour often and you love it as much as I do, you might want to consider making a large amount of it and storing it in a covered container for future use.

2) Curdle the non-dairy milk mixture

Preheat your oven to 350F (177C). In a small bowl whisk together the non-dairy milk, flax meal and apple cider vinegar. Allow it to sit for 10 minutes so the mixture thickens and slightly curdles. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

3) Whisk together the dry ingredients

In a medium mixing bowl whisk together the bread flour, toasted coconut flour and salt. Set aside.

4) Whisk together the flavor building ingredients

In another medium mixing bowl whisk together the coconut sugar or granulated white sugar, coconut oil, vanilla extract and molasses until well mixed. Add the flax meal mixture from Step 2 and beat until well combined.

Add the ingredients then beat until well combined

5) Mix the dough

Add the flour mixture from Step 3 and hand mix with a spoon until just incorporated. Stir in the chocolate chips until well mixed but no more. This recipe utilizes bread flour to add additional gluten to make up for the lack of it in the coconut flour. Overmixing this dough will activate too much gluten which will result in cookies that don’t spread and come out excessively dry and crumbly due to gluten’s ability to hold onto moisture the more it’s activated. This is why it’s important to mix this dough by hand with a spoon only until just combined. Do not use an electric mixer to mix the dough.
 
After mixing, allow the dough to sit for about 1 minute so the coconut flour can soak up extra moisture in the dough. The cookie dough will be easier to handle this way.

6) Form the dough into balls, place them on the cookie sheet, coat with coconut and bake to perfection

Form the dough into 1 ½ inch balls. Place them on the cookie sheet so they're spaced about 2 to 3 inches apart. Using your hands, press the shredded coconut up against and on top of the cookies so it’s sticking to the dough while still leaving the dough mostly in the shape of a dome. If you were careful to not overmix your dough during mixing, they will flatten adequately during baking.

Form the cookies into balls then press the shredded coconut into them
 
Bake for 26 minutes, rotating the baking sheets halfway through the baking duration. This long baking time is required due to the cookies containing a significantly higher amount of water due to coconut flour's absorptive properties. The cookies will store in an airtight container at room temperature for about one week or in a freezer bag in the freezer for up to six months. This recipe makes about 22 to 24 Vegan Toasted Coconut Chocolate Chip Cookies.

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Thu, 01 Aug 2013 04:59:06 -0400
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/vanilla-and-almond-crescents <![CDATA[Vegan Vanilla and Almond Crescents]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/vanilla-and-almond-crescents Vegan Vanilla Almond Crescent CookiesThese Vegan Vanilla and Almond Crescents are an incredibly delicious biscuit with just the right amount of sweetness and lots of rich flavours from the almonds and vanilla. My choice of coconut oil for this (and most of my cooking) is the more refined kind, which is refined by filtering it through clay to remove the coconut taste and smell. This gives a ‘buttery’ flavour and texture to the baked good with all the goodness of coconut oil, but without being overwhelmed by coconut flavours. {loadposition share}Vegan Vanilla Almond Crescent Cookies

These Vegan Vanilla and Almond Crescents are an incredibly delicious biscuit with just the right amount of sweetness and lots of rich flavours from the almonds and vanilla. My choice of coconut oil for this (and most of my cooking) is the more refined kind, which is refined by filtering it through clay to remove the coconut taste and smell. This gives a ‘buttery’ flavour and texture to the baked good with all the goodness of coconut oil, but without being overwhelmed by coconut flavours.

Soy-free, Wheat-free, Gluten-free option, under 45 minutes. Kitchen time 15 minutes, baking time 12 to 15 minutes.

Find more Easy recipes on Veganbaking.net

Vegan Vanilla and Almond Crescent Recipe

1 cup almonds, ground
3/4 cup unrefined sugar
2  1/3 cups barley flour (or wholemeal spelt, wholewheat pastry or gluten-free)
a pinch of salt
3/4 cup coconut oil, melted (or a mixture of melted coconut oil and olive oil)
1/4 cup water
2 to 3 teaspoons vanilla extract
 
optional powdered vegan sugar, for coating
 
Preheat the oven to 350F (175C).  Line or grease two baking sheets.
 
For best results, grind the almonds and sugar together in a food processor. In a mixing bowl, combine the almonds, sugar, flour and salt. Stir through the coconut oil, water and vanilla extract to form a thick dough.
 
Take tablespoons of the dough and shape into logs that have thinner ends and a thicker centre. Curl into crescent moon shapes and place on the baking trays.
 
Bake for 12 to 15 minutes, until lightly browned. Sprinkle with powdered vegan sugar if you want.
 
I suspect these will keep in a sealed container for longer than a week, although they never last that long in our house. This recipe makes about 20 Vegan Vanilla and Almond Crescent Cookies.

About the author: Hilda is the author of Triumph of the Lentil: Soy-Free Vegan Wholefoods for all Appetites
 
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Fri, 04 May 2012 03:13:31 -0400
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/peanut-butter-cookies <![CDATA[Vegan Peanut Butter Cookies | Gluten-free]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/peanut-butter-cookies Vegan Peanut Butter CookiesVegan Peanut Butter Cookies are my very favorite comfort food. These are absolutely as good as I remember them... minus the eggs, dairy and gluten! Perfection. {loadposition share}Vegan Peanut Butter Cookies

Vegan Peanut Butter Cookies are my very favorite comfort food. These are absolutely as good as I remember them... minus the eggs, dairy and gluten! Perfection.

Find more Gluten-free recipes on Veganbaking.net

Vegan Peanut Butter Cookie Recipe

½ cups gluten-free flour blend (I love Bob's Red Mill) 
1 teaspoon baking soda 
1 teaspoon xanthan gum

1 cup packed dark brown sugar 
¾ cup peanut butter 
½ cup Earth Balance vegan butter (or Spectrum shortening) 
1 tsp pure vanilla 
¼ cup unsweetened applesauce
 
organic cane sugar 
 
1)
In a small bowl whisk together the flour, baking soda and xanthan gum. Set aside. 

2)
With an electric mixer, combine all other ingredients and mix until smooth. Slowly mix in the dry ingredients. 

3)
Roll the dough into balls then roll in cane the sugar. Flatten the cookies with your palm or use a fork to make traditional cross marks.  Bake at 375F (191C) for 6 to 8 minutes. This recipe makes about 15 Vegan Peanut Butter Cookies.
 
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Fri, 02 Mar 2012 19:54:21 -0500
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/gingerbread-marmalade-sandwich-cookies <![CDATA[Vegan Gingerbread Marmalade Sandwich Cookies]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/gingerbread-marmalade-sandwich-cookies
Vegan Gingerbread Marmalade Sandwich CookiesI’m a huge fan of linzer cookies which are sandwich cookies featuring an almond pastry crust sandwiching a tart raspberry jam center. I’m also a huge fan of gingerbread paired with orange. The tart orange pairs well with the spicy, bright flavors of ginger. These Vegan Gingerbread Marmalade Sandwich Cookies were borne out of a desire to combine the best qualities of these cookie styles, featuring a cookie that also delivers a crispy exterior, giving way to a chewy, jam layered center. 
Since this recipe features gingerbread, it relies on placing the dough in the refrigerator between steps to ensure the dough is stiff and easy to work with. It’s worth clearing space in your freezer for two baking sheets before you start. I recommend using small cookie cutters for these cookies because the dough will spread out considerably during baking, making the cookies larger. I ended up using a small flower cookie cutter and an apple corer to cut the center holes. Adding about 4 drops of orange extract to the marmalade will ensure it has enough strength to stand up against and optimally pair with the gingerbread.
{loadposition share}Vegan Gingerbread Marmalade Sandwich Cookies

I’m a huge fan of linzer cookies which are sandwich cookies featuring an almond pastry crust sandwiching a tart raspberry jam center. I’m also a huge fan of gingerbread paired with orange. The tart orange pairs well with the spicy, bright flavors of ginger. These Vegan Gingerbread Marmalade Sandwich Cookies were borne out of a desire to combine the best qualities of these cookie styles, featuring a cookie that also delivers a crispy exterior, giving way to a chewy, jam layered center. 

Vegan gingerbread cookie dough requires a little extra love

Since this recipe features gingerbread, it relies on placing the dough in the refrigerator between steps to ensure the dough is stiff and easy to work with. It’s worth clearing space in your freezer for two baking sheets before you start. I recommend using small cookie cutters for these cookies because the dough will spread out considerably during baking, making the cookies larger. I ended up using a small flower cookie cutter and an apple corer to cut the center holes. Adding about 4 drops of orange extract to the marmalade will ensure it has enough strength to stand up against and optimally pair with the gingerbread.

Find more Gingerbread recipes on Veganbaking.net
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Vegan Gingerbread Marmalade Sandwich Cookie Recipe

3 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
 
¾ cup (161 grams) Regular Vegan Butter or stick margarine, softened
2/3 cup sugar
½ cup molasses
¼ cup barley malt syrup
1 Tablespoon non-dairy milk
1 ½ teaspoons ginger powder
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
¾ teaspoon cinnamon
¾ teaspoon nutmeg
¼ teaspoon salt
 
4 ounces marmalade
4 drops orange extract (optional)
 
2 Tablespoons sanding sugar

1) Prepare your oven, baking sheets and whisk the flour

Preheat your oven to 350F (177C). Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper and place them in the freezer. In a medium size bowl whisk together the all-purpose flour, baking soda and set aside.

2) Whisk together the flavor building ingredients

In another medium size bowl mix together the Vegan Butter, sugar, molasses, barley malt, non-dairy milk, ginger powder, vanilla extract, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt.

3) Build the cookie dough

Pour half of the flour into the bowl containing the wet ingredients and mix with a spoon until well incorporated. Pour the other half of the flour and mix with with a spoon until well incorporated. It's normal for the dough to feel really thick at this point and you may have to mix with your hands.

4) Chill the dough

Form the dough into a ball, flatten it into a 1 inch disc and wrap it in plastic wrap. Chill the dough in the refrigerator from 4 hours to 3 days. Alternatively, the dough can be frozen for up to 3 months. 

5) Roll out the dough

Unwrap the dough and save the plastic wrap. Lightly flour a clean surface and roll the dough out using a rolling pin, rolling radial strokes going from the center outward. Roll to 3/16 of an inch. Coat the rolling pin with a dusting of flour between rolls to keep the dough from sticking to the rolling pin.

6) Prepare the bottom gingerbread pieces

Cut the dough into your bottom shape using a cookie cutter and leave it in the dough. Dust a thin metal spatula dusted with flour and slide it under the cookie cutter and dough. A thin spatula makes life much easier in this recipe. If you don’t have a thin one you may need to place the cookies in the freezer longer to firm up the dough enough so it’s easily transferred. Transfer the dough to the baking sheet and use the cookie cutter to carefully slide the dough from the spatula to the baking sheet. Do this for about ⅔ of the dough you rolled out. Transfer the baking sheet to your freezer for 20 minutes so the dough firms up. Gather the excess dough into a ball, flatten it to a 1 inch disc, wrap it back in the plastic wrap and place it in the freezer.

7) Spread the marmalade

If your marmalade has been in the refrigerator, remove the lid and place it in the microwave for about 10 seconds so it can get to room temperature. Having the marmalade at room temperature is crucial so it can be spread thin. Whisk together the marmalade with the orange extract (if using) until well incorporated. Remove the dough you wrapped up and the baking sheet from the freezer. Spread a thin coat of marmalade on each bottom cookie. Place the cookies and their sheet aside.

Spread the marmalade

8) Make the top gingerbread pieces

Preheat your oven to 400F (204C). Roll out the remaining dough again to 3/16 of an inch like you did on Step 2. Cut the pieces as you did on Step 3 then place the sheet in the freezer for 10 minutes. Remove the sheet and use a smaller cookie cutter to cut out the center piece. If you have trouble cutting the holes, just put the cookies in the freezer for a bit longer so they solidify more. I used an apple corer to cut the holes in this recipe. 

9) Apply sanding sugar to the cookie tops

liberally sprinkle sanding sugar over the tops of the cookie tops. Use the flat bottom of a drinking glass to press the sugar crystals into the cookie tops so they stay in place during baking. Place both sheets of cookies back in the freezer for 20 minutes.

Apply sanding sugar to the cookie tops

10) Assemble the vegan gingerbread cookies and bake to perfection

Remove both cookies sheets from the freezer. Carefully place the top cookie pieces onto the bottom pieces, creating a cookie sandwich with marmalade in the middle. Lightly press down to ensure the top cookie is secure. Reduce oven heat to 350F (177C) and bake for 22 minutes, rotating the cookie sheet halfway through the baking duration. Allow the cookies to cool on the sheets for about 15 minutes before transferring them to wire racks to cool. Store in an air-tight container at room temperature for up to one week or in the freezer for up to three months. Depending on the size of your cookie cutters, this recipe makes about 20 Vegan Gingerbread Marmalade Sandwich Cookies.

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Thu, 26 Jan 2012 20:17:09 -0500
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/peanut-butter-chocolate-chip-cookies-3 <![CDATA[Vegan Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookies]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/peanut-butter-chocolate-chip-cookies-3
Vegan Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip CookieFor me, the ultimate cookie is crispy on the outside, yielding to a satisfying chew on the inside. This should not be confused with just a soft cookie. It should resist your bite a little and take a few moments to break down in your mouth as it provides bust of flavor with every chew. In contrast, soft cookies tend to be great on the first bite and disintegrate into nothingness soon after, often leaving you feel like you’re chewing on sweet dust. I’m a huge fan of peanut butter but I find the texture of peanut butter cookies to too often fall into the soft-only or even worse, the crumbly camp. If you scale back on their precious peanut butter they retain their chewy qualities but also quickly turn into regular cookies with just a hint of peanut butter flavor. I set out to find the optimum combination of decadent chewiness while keeping a peanut butter punch as intense as possible (and tossing in chocolate chips for good measure). This tightrope walk is extremely dangerous in that it causes you to eat way too many test cookies as you perfect your recipe.
{loadposition share}Vegan Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookie

For me, the ultimate cookie is crispy on the outside, yielding to a satisfying chew on the inside. This should not be confused with just a soft cookie. It should resist your bite a little and take a few moments to break down in your mouth as it provides burst of flavor with every chew. In contrast, soft cookies tend to be great on the first bite and disintegrate into nothingness soon after, often leaving you feel like you’re chewing on sweet dust. I’m a huge fan of peanut butter but I find the texture of peanut butter cookies to too often fall into the soft-only or even worse, the crumbly camp. If you scale back on their precious peanut butter they retain their chewy qualities but also quickly turn into regular cookies with just a hint of peanut butter flavor. I set out to find the optimum combination of decadent chewiness while keeping a peanut butter punch as intense as possible (and tossing in chocolate chips for good measure). This tightrope walk is extremely dangerous in that it causes you to eat way too many test cookies as you perfect your recipe.
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Building an optimal Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookie

The flax meal in these cookies provides some binding power to keep things moist and chewy and assist in emulsifying the oil-based ingredients with the water-based ingredients. the apple cider vinegar curdles the proteins in the non-dairy milk and adding flavor complexity. The cinnamon, coconut oil, vanilla extract and coconut oil enhance flavors to the point of where vegan butter isn’t necessary. The molasses also assists chew; a similar affect of using brown sugar.

Find more Peanut Butter recipes on Veganbaking.net

Vegan Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookie Recipe

½ cup + 2 Tablespoons non-dairy milk
2 Tablespoons golden flax meal
½ teaspoon apple cider vinegar
 
1 ½ cups + 2 Tablespoons all-purpose flour
¾ teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon salt
 
1 ¾ cups sugar
1 ¼ cups unsalted, natural style peanut butter
¼ cup unrefined coconut oil, melted
 
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon molasses
 
1 cup + 2 Tablespoons semi-sweet chocolate chips

Vegan Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookie

1) Prepare the egg replacer mixture and line your baking sheets

Preheat your oven to 350F (177C). In a small bowl whisk together the flax meal, non-dairy milk and apple cider vinegar. Allow it to sit for 10 minutes so the mixture thickens and curdles. Line two cookie sheets with parchment paper.

2) Whisk together the dry ingredients

In a medium mixing bowl whisk together the all-purpose flour, baking soda, cinnamon and salt until well incorporated. Set aside.

3) Whisk together the flavor building ingredients

In another medium mixing bowl whisk together the sugar, peanut butter and coconut oil until well mixed. Mix in the flax meal mixture from step 1 followed by the molasses and vanilla extract.

4) Build the cookie dough

Add the flour mixture from Step 2 and mix until just incorporated. You may have to use your hands at this point because the dough will be pretty thick. Use your hands to fold in the chocolate chips.

5) Bake the vegan cookies to perfection

Form the dough into 1 ½ inch balls and place them on the cookie sheet so they're spaced about 2 to 3 inches apart. Use a fork to flatten them to ¾ inch and bake for 15 to 17 minutes, rotating the baking sheets halfway through the baking duration. These cookies will not turn golden as they bake so it's important to pay attention to the baking time.
 Store the cookies in an air tight container at room temperature for about one week or in the freezer for up to two months. This recipe makes about 22 to 24 Vegan Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookies.

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Thu, 13 Oct 2011 03:05:52 -0400
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/strawberry-thumbprint-anzac-cookies <![CDATA[Vegan Strawberry Thumbprint Anzac Cookies]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/strawberry-thumbprint-anzac-cookies Strawberry Thumbprint Anzac CookiesAnzac cookies are probably one of my favorite cookies! The richness of coconut, the depth of Lyle’s golden syrup all held together with oats, flour and sugar…oh yeah, and your favorite non-dairy butter too! How incredibly delicious this mixture is. All I can say is THANKS AUSTRALIA for coming up with a perfect cookie. Australians call these cookies biscuits and they were developed during the first World War for the soldiers. They were perfect for travel because they do not contain milk or eggs, which means the soldiers had a yummy way to have sustenance while away. The one secret ingredient is Lyle’s Golden Syrup. I found mine at a local store that has an international section. Look where you might find ingredients from the UK, you will likely find this sweet gem. There’s only one way it could get better…add fruit! So which fruit goes well with coconut and oats? My pick is strawberry. I originally planned on making homemade strawberry jam but then got impatient (big surprise for those who know me) and bought a jar of organic strawberry preserves instead. I suppose that for this recipe you could use homemade jam and it would add another layer of deliciousness. These cookies are sweet, rich and the texture is a little chewy, a little soft…and A LOT delectable. {loadposition share}Strawberry Thumbprint Anzac Cookies

Anzac cookies are probably one of my favorite cookies! The richness of coconut, the depth of Lyle’s golden syrup all held together with oats, flour and sugar…oh yeah, and your favorite non-dairy butter too! How incredibly delicious this mixture is. All I can say is THANKS AUSTRALIA for coming up with a perfect cookie. Australians call these cookies biscuits and they were developed during the first World War for the soldiers. They were perfect for travel because they do not contain milk or eggs, which means the soldiers had a yummy way to have sustenance while away. The one secret ingredient is Lyle’s Golden Syrup. I found mine at a local store that has an international section. Look where you might find ingredients from the UK, you will likely find this sweet gem. There’s only one way it could get better…add fruit! So which fruit goes well with coconut and oats? My pick is strawberry. I originally planned on making homemade strawberry jam but then got impatient (big surprise for those who know me) and bought a jar of organic strawberry preserves instead. I suppose that for this recipe you could use homemade jam and it would add another layer of deliciousness. These cookies are sweet, rich and the texture is a little chewy, a little soft…and A LOT delectable.

Find more Strawberry recipes on Veganbaking.net

Vegan Strawberry Thumbprint Anzac Cookie Recipe

1 cup rolled oats
¾ desiccated coconut (I use unsweetened)
1 cup white flour
1 cup sugar

125 grams (4 oz) Earth Balance (1 stick)
2 Tablespoons Lyle’s golden syrup

½ teaspoon baking soda
1 to 3 Tablespoons water

1, 10 oz. jar of strawberry jam or preserves

1)
The recipe is fairly straightforward: Preheat oven to 300F (149C). In a big bowl, mix oats, flour, sugar & coconut together.

2)
In a little bowl, melt syrup and butter together.

3)
In a baby bowl, mix soda with 1 Teaspoon boiling water. Add to melted butter and syrup. Then add that to the dry ingredients. Mix together, add a little extra water if it seems really dry.

4)
Place 1 Tablespoon of mixture on parchment paper lined cookie sheets (allow room for spreading). Flatten with fingers just slightly and add a small spoonful of jam to the top of each cookie. Sprinkle with coconut as a garnish if desired

5)
Bake for 20 minutes, checking periodically. These cookies have a tendency to brown really fast. Let cool completely and devour. This recipe makes about 15 Vegan Strawberry Thumbprint Anzac Cookies.

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Thu, 16 Jun 2011 02:37:35 -0400
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/chewy-oatmeal-raisin-cookies <![CDATA[Chewy Vegan Oatmeal Raisin Cookies]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/chewy-oatmeal-raisin-cookies Chewy Vegan Oatmeal Raisin CookiesMy grandmother used to make the best cookies I've ever tasted. They were oatmeal raisin cookies that had a barely crisp exterior that gave way to a chewy, rich center, releasing the most amazing oatmeal flavor. I asked her for the recipe once and she said she just made them by heart. How did people ever do that? It's amazing to me when something as exact as baking can be done without a recipe and be consistently amazing every time. {loadposition share}Chewy Vegan Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

My grandmother used to make the best cookies I've ever tasted. They were oatmeal raisin cookies that had a barely crisp exterior that gave way to a chewy, rich center that would release the most amazing oatmeal flavor. I asked her for the recipe once and she said she just made them by heart. How did people ever do that? It's amazing to me when something as exact as baking can be done without a recipe and be consistently amazing every time.

Building flavor and texture in a vegan oatmeal cookies

Not having a concrete recipe made it more difficult to replicate but I'll never forget the way they tasted. These Chewy Vegan Oatmeal Cookies are inspired by Nana's cookies along with the methods I know to build flavor and texture. This cookie is all about getting a nice chew factor while producing complex, rich oaty notes. Condensed non-dairy milk builds richness. Chewiness is enhanced by using a fat blend that is 1 part saturated to 3 parts unsaturated, mixing the dough to develop some gluten and using just the right amount of molasses. Oats absorb lots of liquid while they bake so the dough needs to have a higher water content to compensate. Soaking the raisins keeps them from getting too burned as they bake. I call for rum which is a great pairing with oaty flavors. If you're not keen on alcohol, water will also work well too. The result is a cookie that I'm sure Nana would approve of.

Find more Oat recipes on Veganbaking.net
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Chewy Vegan Oatmeal Raisin Cookie Recipe

¾ cup raisins
½ cup dried cranberries
½ cup rum or water

¾ cup sugar
¼ cup unrefined coconut oil, melted
½ cup canola, light olive oil or rice bran oil 
1 cup Vegan Condensed Non-dairy Milk (if you don't have time to make condensed milk then substitute it with 1 cup non-dairy milk and increase the sugar in this recipe by ½ cup)
2 Tablespoons water
2 Tablespoons golden flax meal
2 teaspoons molasses
¼ teaspoon cinnamon
¼ teaspoon nutmeg
½ teaspoon salt

3 cups old fashioned rolled oats
1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
¼ teaspoon baking powder

1) Prepare your raisins

Preheat your oven to 350F (177C). Line two baking sheets with parchment paper and set aside. Place the raisins and cranberries in a bowl and cover them with the rum or water. Microwave for 1 minute and let them soak for about 10 minutes so they plump. Drain the excess liquid and discard.

2) Whisk together the flavor building ingredients

in a medium mixing bowl add the sugar, coconut oil, canola oil, condensed non-dairy milk, water, flax meal, molasses, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt. Whisk until smooth.

3) Whisk together the dry ingredient and mix the dough

In a medium mixing bowl whisk together the oats, all-purpose flour and baking powder. Add the wet mixture from Step 2 and mix on low for 1 minute. This will develop some of the gluten in the flour which will increase chewiness. Mix in the raisins and cranberries with a spoon until just incorporated. Allow the dough to sit for 20 minutes so the oats become hydrated.

4) Transfer the vegan oatmeal raisin cookie dough to baking sheets and bake to perfection

Using two spoons, scoop up dough that's roughly 1 ½ inches in size and arrange them on the cookie sheet so they're spaced about 2 inches apart. Bake for 24 to 26 minutes, rotating the baking sheets halfway through the baking duration. The cookies are done when they barely start to turn golden.
These cookies will store in an air tight container at room temperature for about one week or in the freezer for up to two months. This recipe makes about 30 Chewy Vegan Oatmeal Cookies.

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Sat, 02 Apr 2011 02:19:14 -0400
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/power-puffs <![CDATA[Vegan Power Puffs]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/power-puffs Vegan Power PuffsThese Vegan Power Puffs are so puff-tastic! I highly recommend them. I have never used millet before and I will certainly be using it more often. It’s fluffy, light and has more protein than puffed rice. These little power puffs are a perfect snack with a hot cuppa joe. You can easily cut this recipe in half if you aren’t trying to feed an army. These are so good that my husband brought them to his Tai Chi class this morning and vanished with a request for more next week…I highly suggest you give these a whirl. {loadposition share}Vegan Power Puffs

These Vegan Power Puffs are so puff-tastic! I highly recommend them. I have never used millet before and I will certainly be using it more often. It’s fluffy, light and has more protein than puffed rice. These little power puffs are a perfect snack with a hot cuppa joe. You can easily cut this recipe in half if you aren’t trying to feed an army. These are so good that my husband brought them to his Tai Chi class this morning and vanished with a request for more next week…I highly suggest you give these a whirl.

Find more Gluten-free recipes on Veganbaking.net

Vegan Power Puff Recipe

4 cups puffed millet cereal
2/3 cup raisins
2/3 cup dried cranberries
1/2 cup peanuts, chopped (or nut of choice)
1/2 cup pumpkin seeds
1/2 cup sunflower seeds

1 cup peanut butter (or other nut butter)
1 cup brown rice syrup
1-2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
salt if desired

1)
In a medium bowl mix the cereal, raisins, cranberries, nuts, pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds.

2)
In a small saucepan combine the peanut butter and brown rice syrup. Cook over low heat for 1 to 2 minutes, stirring occasionally until warm and bubbly. Remove from heat and stir in the vanilla and salt if desired. Pour over cereal the mixture and stir until thoroughly coated.

3)
Wait until cooled slightly, the peanut butter mixture can get very hot, then mold into balls (the size of golf balls). Transfer mixture to a cookie sheet to continue cooling. Tip – it helps to dampen hands, this mix can get very sticky.

This recipe makes 36 to 40 Vegan Power Puffs.
Nutrition Facts for 36 Power Puffs: Calories: 112.8, Total Fat: 5.5 g, Total Carbs: 14.5 g, Protein: 2.8 g


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Sat, 12 Mar 2011 23:25:09 -0500
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/pistachio-meringue-cookies <![CDATA[Vegan Pistachio Meringue Cookies]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/pistachio-meringue-cookies Vegan Meringue CookiesI set out to into the annals of food science to create a Vegan Meringue recipe. I ended up uncovering a treasure trove of information that can be applied to other vegan baking applications. 

Meringue is a perfect example of how eggs act in traditional baking and how difficult it often is to replace them. When an egg is beaten extensively the proteins contained within it unravel and bind together like rebar in concrete, air bubbles are trapped and ingredients are easily able to coexist together regardless of moisture content. Traditional meringue involves beating an egg mixture until it has incorporated a large volume of air bubbles, strengthening this mixture so it holds it's shape, adding sweeteners and flavorings then piping and baking it so it slightly leavens and dries to a crisp. Perfectly baked meringue has a delicate crispness that dissolves in your mouth and leaves behind a slightly chewy but not gummy center. There's nothing earthy and natural about this meringue. Order your hard to find ingredients online, put on your extra nerdy glasses and let's make vegan meringue!
{loadposition share}Vegan Meringue Cookies

I set out to into the annals of food science to create a Vegan Meringue recipe. I ended up uncovering a treasure trove of information that can be applied to other vegan baking applications. 

Meringue is a perfect example of how eggs act in traditional baking and how difficult it often is to replace them. When an egg is beaten extensively the proteins contained within it unravel and bind together like rebar in concrete, air bubbles are trapped and ingredients are easily able to coexist together regardless of moisture content. Traditional meringue involves beating an egg mixture until it has incorporated a large volume of air bubbles, strengthening this mixture so it holds it's shape, adding sweeteners and flavorings then piping and baking it so it slightly leavens and dries to a crisp. Perfectly baked meringue has a delicate crispness that dissolves in your mouth and leaves behind a slightly chewy but not gummy center. There's nothing earthy and natural about this meringue. Order your hard to find ingredients online, put on your extra nerdy glasses and let's make vegan meringue!
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Stark Discoveries in Starch

How do you remove such a versatile ingredient such as an egg and replace it with something else when making meringue? After all, the majority of a traditional meringue is from the egg. No flax meal here; I knew that a certain ratio of starches, proteins and gums were the only way to go. I decided to start first with the starch.

Vegetable starches come in two main forms: root based such as arrowroot, tapioca and potato starch and grain based such as corn starch, wheat starch and rice starch. Root based starches have higher amounts of amylopectin which, when activated by heat, gel up into a thick, moist goop. Grain based starch has a higher amount of amylose which dries to a tough, rigid form after being activated by heat. Have you ever wondered why people often make wheat paste to glue flyers on outdoor surfaces or why books traditionally have been bound by wheat based glue? The proof is in the pudding! I performed tests with corn starch, wheat starch, tapioca starch and arrowroot starch where I placed 2 Tablespoons of each in a small sauce pan with 1 cup of water and activated the mixture until it was 250F (121C). I then transferred the mixture to a bowl, waited for each batch of starch to cool to room temperature and poked it with my finger to observe firmness. The high amount of amylose in the corn and wheat starches made them the clear winners for what I was going after: a dense, firm gel. No wonder corn starch is the go-to ingredient when breading or crusting things like tofu, tempeh or seitan. The higher amount of amylopectin in the arrowroot and tapioca starch made them too gelatinous to be of any use in a meringue.

Next I had to ensure the starch I was using was as flavor neutral as possible. Since I was planning on using a large amount of starch this was extremely important. I taste tested the corn starch and was surprised to get an intense burst of bitter soapy flavor. I then tasted the wheat starch and did not detect a large amount of off-flavor. Too bad wheat starch is a relatively exotic ingredient. I promptly ordered a large batch of it on the internet. Wheat starch has just secured a permanent spot in my kitchen for future baking adventures.

Building Structure in Vegan Meringue

Beating activated wheat starch didn't change the mixture's consistency at all. Beating unactivated wheat starch in water produced a basic sea foam consistency but failed to develop further; I needed to trap more air bubbles. Xanthan gum is an amazing polysaccharide produced by fermenting a bacteria, Xanthomonas campestris on corn sugar. This is the same bacteria that produces the slimy substance on the vegetables that are starting to go bad in your refrigerator. The difference is that xanthan gum is produced in an otherwise sterile environment so there's no risk of contamination or questionable black slime. Xanthan gum is extremely versatile because it enables ingredients to mix together well, hold onto air bubbles and it provides structure, making it great for foams. Very few vegan ingredients can do all of these things in one fell swoop. After beating a bit to the wheat starch mixture I was soon rewarded with a bowlful of fluffy foam.

I then beat in soy protein isolate to reinforce the structure of the foam. As mentioned above, protein in baking acts like rebar in concrete to bind and secure structure. Cream of tartar was then beaten in to encourage the proteins to further unravel and bind. When making meringue you want to look for what's called the bird's beak which refers to the shape of the foam when you take out one of the beaters and hold it horizontally. I knew I was going in the right direction when I pulled out the beaters to find the bird's beak staring me in the face! I flapped my wings with delight and let out a loud squawk that my neighbors hopefully didn't hear.

Bagock! Nice Beak You Have There

Meringue Methods

After beating this mixture until it had the optimal ratio of foam to structure I added the sugar and flavorings. This meringue is based on the French method where sugar is beaten in, opposed to the Italian method where simple syrup is beaten in. I got significantly better results with the French method because the simple syrup in the Italian method tended to weigh the foam down excessively.
I've also seen the French method done with confectioner's sugar but in testing I got identical results with granulated sugar so I opted for that route. Confectioner's sugar also contains potato starch which I wanted to avoid introducing into the equation.

Enhancing Flavor

Since traditional meringue is just sweetened dried egg foam it has a tendency to taste bland. Adding caramel sauce and toasted pistachios added much needed flavor depth without inhibiting the consistency of the meringue. After making countless batches using different ratios of ingredients, varying degrees of temperature and an array of different baking times I settled with the recipe below. This meringue is baked about twice as long as traditional meringue because the xanthan gum is so effective at holding onto moisture it needs more time to allow it to dry out. Higher baking temperatures and larger cookie sizes saw the introduction of unwanted large air bubbles in the meringue cookies.

Vegan Meringue Pastry Bag

Vegan Meringue Piped

I attempted to use this recipe and method as a base for angel food cake but so far have been unsuccessful as of this writing, mainly due to the excessive moisture that the xanthan gum holds onto before needing to be baked out.

Find more French-style recipes on Veganbaking.net

Vegan Pistachio Meringue Cookie Recipe

¾ cup water
¼ cup wheat starch
1 teaspoon xanthan gum

2 Tablespoons soy protein isolate

¼ teaspoon cream of tartar

1 cup sugar
¾ teaspoon vanilla extract
2 Tablespoons Vegan Golden Caramel Sauce or Easy Vegan Caramel Sauce

1/3 cup toasted pistachios chopped into ¼ inch pieces (chopped in half)

1) Toast the pistachios and prepare your baking sheets

Toast the pistachios. Preheat your oven to 200F (93C). Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

Learn more about how to toast nuts.

2) Beat the structure building ingredients

In a medium mixing bowl add the water, wheat starch, xanthan gum and beat for 1 minute. Add the soy protein isolate and beat for 2 more minutes. Add the cream of tartar and beat for 4 more minutes.

3) Beat in the flavor building ingredients

Carefully sprinkle half the sugar into the mixture and continue to beat until incorporated which should take about 30 seconds. Add the vanilla extract and caramel sauce. Reduce the speed to the lowest setting on your mixer and slowly add the remaining sugar. Mix until just incorporated. Now fold in the pistachios.

4) Pipe the vegan meringue onto the baking sheet then bake to perfection

I recommend piping them into 1 ½ inch rounds on a baking sheet using the biggest star tip you can find. I use an Ateco #829 which has a 17mm opening. If you're unable to pipe then use two spoons to arrange about 3 Tablespoons of meringue on the baking sheet about 1 inch apart. Bake for 3 hours and 30 minutes. Store the cooled in an open container at room temperature for up to three weeks. The meringues will dry out and become more crisp, losing their chewy centers the longer they sit around. This recipe makes about 30 Vegan Pistachio Meringue Cookies.

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Sat, 19 Feb 2011 05:34:23 -0500
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/macadamia-snickerdoodle-cookies <![CDATA[Vegan Macadamia Snickerdoodle Cookies]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/macadamia-snickerdoodle-cookies Vegan Macadamia Snickerdoodle CookiesThis Vegan Macadamia Snickerdoodle Cookie recipe utilizes a soft, buttery dough that's designed to leaven fast in the oven then fall. This results in the trademark crackly top that some say give this cookie the origins of it's name; schneckennudeln which means snail noodle in German. Snickerdoodle dough is similar to sugar cookie dough but there is more leavening power and the dough is rolled in cinnamon sugar prior to baking in the snickerdoodle version. The result is a tender cookie that is slightly crispy on the outside and soft on the inside accompanied by rich cinnamon notes. {loadposition share}Vegan Macadamia Snickerdoodle Cookies

This Vegan Macadamia Snickerdoodle Cookie recipe utilizes a soft, buttery dough that's designed to leaven fast in the oven then fall. This results in the trademark crackly top that some say give this cookie the origins of it's name; schneckennudeln which means snail noodle in German. Snickerdoodle dough is similar to sugar cookie dough but there is more leavening power and the dough is rolled in cinnamon sugar prior to baking in the snickerdoodle version. The result is a tender cookie that is slightly crispy on the outside and soft on the inside accompanied by rich cinnamon notes.

Find more Macadamia recipes on Veganbaking.net
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Vegan Macadamia Snickerdoodle Cookie Recipe

For the rolling mixture

3 Tablespoons sugar
1 Tablespoon cinnamon

For the dough

¼ cup + 2 Tablespoons non-dairy milk
2 Tablespoons golden flax meal
2 teaspoons cream of tartar

2 ¼ cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon salt

1 ½ cups sugar
¾ cups (160 grams) Regular Vegan Butter or stick margarine (1 ½ sticks, softened but cool)
¼ cup (54 grams) Vegan Shortening or store bought shortening

½ cup macadamia nuts, toasted

1) Prepare your oven, baking sheets and rolling mixture

Preheat your oven to 400F (204C). Line two large baking sheets with parchment paper. Prepare your rolling mixture by whisking together the 3 Tablespoons sugar and 1 Tablespoon cinnamon in a small bowl. Set aside.

2) Curdle the non-dairy milk mixture

In a small mixing bowl, whisk the non-dairy milk, flax meal and cream of tartar until smooth. Set aside for about 10 minutes so the mixture gets thick and curdles.

3) Whisk together the dry ingredients

In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the all-purpose flour, baking soda and salt.

4) Cream the fats and beat in the flax mixture

In another medium mixing bowl, cream together the 1 ½ cups sugar, Vegan Butter and shortening until well combined which should take about 1 to 1 ½ minutes. Add the flax mixture from Step 2 and beat until well combined, about 30 seconds.

5) Build the cookie dough

Add half of the dry ingredients and mix with a spoon until the mixture comes together. Add the rest of the dry ingredients and mix with your hands until just combined. Add the macadamia nuts and mix until they're evenly distributed.

Squish each cookie to 3/4 inch

6) Bake the vegan snickerdoodles to perfection

Roll the dough into 1 ½ inch diameter balls and roll them in the Rolling Mixture until coated. Transfer  to the baking sheet, making sure they're spaced about 2 inches apart. Use the bottom of a drinking glass to squish each cookie to ¾ inch. Use a slight twisting motion after squishing to allow the drinking glass to release from the cookie. Bake for about 12 minutes, rotating the baking sheets halfway through the baking duration.
Store in a tightly sealed freezer bag at room temperature for up to ten days. This recipe makes about 30 Vegan Macadamia Snickerdoodle Cookies.

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Wed, 26 Jan 2011 01:51:13 -0500
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/cranberry-pecan-oatmeal-cookies <![CDATA[Vegan Cranberry Pecan Oatmeal Cookies]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/cranberry-pecan-oatmeal-cookies Vegan Cranberry Pecan Oatmeal CookiesThese Vegan Cranberry Pecan Oatmeal Cookies are one of the standards of our Christmas baking celebrations. They are crispy on the outside and soft on the inside. The crunchy pecans and tart-sweetness of the cranberries really make a complex and well rounded flavor and texture. They are really, really delicious! {loadposition share}Vegan Cranberry Pecan Oatmeal Cookies

These Vegan Cranberry Pecan Oatmeal Cookies are one of the standards of our Christmas baking celebrations. They are crispy on the outside and soft on the inside. The crunchy pecans and tart-sweetness of the cranberries really make a complex and well rounded flavor and texture. They are really, really delicious!

Find more Cranberry recipes on Veganbaking.net
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Vegan Cranberry Pecan Oatmeal Cookie Recipe

2 ½ Tablespoons golden flax meal
6 Tablespoons water

2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon salt
1-2 pinches cinnamon
1 pinch nutmeg

1 cup (2 sticks) Earth Balance margarine, room temp

1-3 teaspoons vanilla
1 cup granulated white sugar
1 cup packed brown sugar

2 cups oats
1 cup dried cranberries
1 cup chopped pecans

1)
Preheat your oven to 400F (204C). Mix the flax and water in a small bowl and let it gel up.

2)
Combine the flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt and spices in a medium mixing bowl.

3)
Beat the Earth Balance in a separate medium mixing bowl until softened (but not liquidy). Beat in the flax meal mixture until well combined followed by the vanilla then the sugar. Mix in the flour with a rubber spatula then mix on low for 5 seconds. The batter will be thick.

4)
Stir in the oats, cranberries and pecans. Drop by the rounded Tablespoon onto a parchment paper-lined cookie sheet, roll into balls and place 2 inches apart. (Try to keep the dough cool in between baking sessions. I keep mine in the fridge) Bake for 11 minutes or until golden brown. Cool the cookies on their sheets for 1 to 2 minutes then transfer to cookie racks and cool completely (or eat while hot!). This recipe makes 15 to 20 Vegan Cranberry Pecan Oatmeal Cookies.

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Thu, 30 Dec 2010 23:44:25 -0500
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/vegan-gingerbread-pecan-biscotti <![CDATA[Vegan Gingerbread Pecan Biscotti]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/vegan-gingerbread-pecan-biscotti Vegan Gingerbread Pecan BiscottiThis Vegan Gingerbread Pecan Biscotti recipe showcases the winning combination of candied ginger, pecans, molasses and just the right amount of spices like cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg. The result is a vegan biscotti armed with a deep, complex flavor with a spicy finish that helps kick out those winter blues. {loadposition share}Vegan Gingerbread Pecan Biscotti

This Vegan Gingerbread Pecan Biscotti recipe showcases the winning combination of candied ginger, pecans, molasses and just the right amount of spices like cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg. The result is a vegan biscotti armed with a deep, complex flavor with a spicy finish that helps kick out those winter blues.

Find more Gingerbread recipes on Veganbaking.net

Vegan Gingerbread Pecan Biscotti Recipe

1/3 cup, 1 Tablespoon water
2 Tablespoons golden flax meal

1 cup, 2 Tablespoons all-purpose flour
½ cup whole wheat flour
½ cup white sugar
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 ½ teaspoons ground ginger
1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon ground cloves
¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg
¼ teaspoon salt

3 Tablespoons (40 grams) Regular Vegan Butter or stick margarine, melted

½ cup pecans, cut into ¼ inch pieces
¼ cup candied ginger, cut into ¼ inch pieces

2 Tablespoons molasses
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1) Prepare your flax mixture

Preheat the oven to 375F (190C). Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper. In a large mixing bowl whisk together the water and flax meal. Set aside for about 10 minutes so the mixture thickens.

2) Whisk together the flavor building ingredients then cut in the Vegan Butter

In a large bowl, whisk together the all-purpose flour, whole wheat flour, sugar, cinnamon, ground ginger, baking powder, cloves, nutmeg and salt. Cut in the melted Vegan Butter until the dough resembles a grainy texture.

3) Add the pecans and ginger

Stir in the pecan pieces and the candied ginger pieces.

Learn how to make crystallized ginger.

4) Build the biscotti dough

Add the molasses and vanilla to the bowl containing the flax meal mixture and whisk until well incorporated. Add this mixture to the bowl containing the flour in Step 2 and mix until just incorporated. Use your hands to mix the dough at this point but don't knead or over mix it. The dough will be very loose and dry but resist the urge to add water.

5) Shape the dough

Shape the dough into a log about 10 inches long and place it on cookie sheet. Pat it down to flatten the dough to ½ inch thickness.

6) Bake the vegan biscotti to perfection

Bake for 30 minutes. When cool enough to touch, cut into 1 inch thick diagonal slices. Place sliced biscotti on cookie sheet, and bake an additional 5 to 7 minutes on each side, or until it's almost rock hard. There will be a little moisture still left in the biscotti that will evaporate out while they're cooling.
This recipe makes about 10 to 12 pieces of Vegan Gingerbread Pecan Biscotti.

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Tue, 17 Feb 2009 04:02:19 -0500
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/sugar-cookies <![CDATA[Vegan Sugar Cookies]]> http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/cookies/sugar-cookies Vegan Sugar CookiesThese Vegan Sugar Cookies are perfect for the Holidays or any time you feel like treating yourself. This recipe is on the shortbread side of things so they're nice and crispy. They can be rolled and cut with cookie cutters or pressed out of a cookie press. Dust them with coarse sugar, cinnamon, cardamom or all three if you're feeling frisky.
{loadposition share}Vegan Sugar Cookies

These Vegan Sugar Cookies are perfect for the Holidays or any time you feel like treating yourself. This recipe is on the shortbread side of things so they're nice and crispy. They can be rolled and cut with cookie cutters or pressed out of a cookie press. Dust them with coarse sugar, cinnamon, cardamom or all three if you're feeling frisky.

Find more Holiday recipes on Veganbaking.net
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Vegan Sugar Cookie Recipe

1/3 cup water
2 Tablespoons golden flax meal

3 ¾ cups all-purpose flour
1 ½ teaspoons baking powder

1 cup Regular Vegan Butter or margarine
2 cups powdered sugar

3 Tablespoons non-dairy milk
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
½ teaspoon almond extract
¾ teaspoon salt

1) Prepare the egg replacer mixture

Preheat oven to 350F (177C). In a small bowl whisk together the water and flax meal.

2) Whisk together the dry ingredients

In a medium size mixing bowl whisk together the flour and baking powder.

3) Build the cookie dough

In another medium mixing bowl mix the Vegan Butter and powdered sugar together until well mixed. Mix in the water and flax meal mixture from step 1 and the non-dairy milk, vanilla extract, almond extract and salt until well mixed.

4) Mix the cookie dough

Add half of the dry ingredients to the bowl containing the wet ingredients and mix. Then add the other half and mix until well incorporated.

5) Cut the vegan cookies to size and bake to perfection

If making cookies with a cookie cutter

Transfer the dough to a work surface. Shape into 2 discs, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for at least 1/2 hour.

On a lightly floured baking surface, roll out the dough to ¼ inch thickness. Cut into cookies with cookie cutters and transfer to a parchment paper lined cookie sheet. Bake about 18 to 20 minutes or until lightly golden. Transfer to wire racks to cool completely. Dust with sugar and cinnamon or cardamom.

If making cookies with a cookie press

Place the dough in the cookie press. Press out the cookies into desired shapes onto a cookie sheet. To ensure that the cookies stick to the cookie sheet after being pressed out of the cookie press, do not line the cookie sheet with parchment paper. Bake about 18 to 20 minutes or until lightly golden. Transfer to wire racks to cool completely. Dust with sugar and cinnamon or cardamom.
Depending on the size of your cookie cutter, this recipe makes about 15 to 20 Vegan Sugar Cookies.

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Sat, 20 Dec 2008 06:36:24 -0500