Veganbaking.net - The Hows and Whys of Vegan Baking
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How to Make Vegan Butter - Regular Vegan Butter - Coconut Oil Base Mattie

Written by Mattie    
 
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Here are some tips to make vegan butter healthier:

¼ + 1/8 teaspoon sea salt or Himalaayan salt (Such salt is richer in mineral enzymes.)

½ cup + 2 Tablespoons + 1 teaspoon cold-treated coconut oil (more nutritious) instead of refined oil (melted)

Ditch the Canola oil - it's genetically modified.

Ditch the soy lecithin (it has potential to cause heart disease...google for this info)

¼ teaspoon xanthan gum

Additionally, microwaving will kill many of the nutrients you want in your vegan butter.
Rating 
 
4.0
kelly kc Reviewed by kelly kc August 08, 2013
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (1)

How to Make Vegan Butter

Here are some tips to make vegan butter healthier:

¼ + 1/8 teaspoon sea salt or Himalaayan salt (Such salt is richer in mineral enzymes.)

½ cup + 2 Tablespoons + 1 teaspoon cold-treated coconut oil (more nutritious) instead of refined oil (melted)

Ditch the Canola oil - it's genetically modified.

Ditch the soy lecithin (it has potential to cause heart disease...google for this info)

¼ teaspoon xanthan gum

Additionally, microwaving will kill many of the nutrients you want in your vegan butter.

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hello,
i tried to make the butter using lecithin granules. they didn't melt so i got my self a butter with little orange dotts.
why? what can i do?

thanks!
Rating 
 
5.0
Reviewed by yael August 06, 2013

lecithin granules that don't melt

hello,
i tried to make the butter using lecithin granules. they didn't melt so i got my self a butter with little orange dotts.
why? what can i do?

thanks!

Owner's reply

Sorry the lecithin granules didn't dissolve in the Vegan Butter yael! Go ahead and remelt it, place it in your food processor and process it for about 5 minutes. If you don't have one, transfer the melted Vegan Butter to a bowl and whisk it until the granules dissolve. Good luck!

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this recipe is so great, thanks for sharing it!
i would love to make this as a large batch so i can freeze enough butter to always have some on hand. i know with other recipes i struggle with double and tripling recipes, but maybe this one will be fine? i guess what i'm saying is: do you think i'll need to adjust anything, or just multiply?
Rating 
 
5.0
tacoma narrows Reviewed by tacoma narrows July 28, 2013
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doubling, tripling, quadrupling....

this recipe is so great, thanks for sharing it!
i would love to make this as a large batch so i can freeze enough butter to always have some on hand. i know with other recipes i struggle with double and tripling recipes, but maybe this one will be fine? i guess what i'm saying is: do you think i'll need to adjust anything, or just multiply?

Owner's reply

Thanks so much tacoma narrows! Since this recipe is mostly liquid based (as opposed to volume based), you should have no trouble doubling or tripling, it. The issue that's going to come up the more the recipe is scaled up is going to be relating to the amount of xanthan gum differing due to it being measured by volume. A quick search online (I don't have my "drug" scale with me at the moment) indicates that 1/4 teaspoon xanthan gum weighs .75 gram. If you really wanted to scale this recipe up by a factor of four or more and guarantee the recipe be totally consistent, I'd recommend acquiring one of these scales (search for Jeweler Scale on Amazon) and measure out .75 grams xanthan gum with it instead of measuring the 1/4 teaspoon. The bottom line is: When scaling up, always convert a recipe from volume to weight. Eventually, when I have 3 billion years of spare time, I'll update all the recipes here to have both volume and weight measurements. Good luck!

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Compliments of: Mattie
at Veganbaking.net
http://www.veganbaking.net/fats/vegan-butters/735-vegan-butter#.UfTxu-AkOxI

Vegan Butter (June's version)
(Mattie's original recipe with a few changes)

Ingredients:

1/2 cup organic unsweetened soy milk
1 t. fresh lemon juice
1 t. sea salt
1 t. agar agar powder
1 cup "refined" coconut oil
("Spectrum" is best if available)
1 T. organic walnut, sunflower or safflower oil
1 t. liquid sunflower or soy lecithin
or (2 t. sunflower or soy lecithin granules)

Directions:

Place the soy milk, lemon juice, agar agar and salt in the food processor and mix to emulsify.
Let mixture set to thicken for about 2 minutes.

Add the "refined" coconut oil, choice of organic oil and lecithin. Process for 3 minutes, scraping down the sides to thoroughly mix. Pour the mixture into a covered dish and place it in the refrigerator to solidify (about 10 minutes). Store the butter in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 3 months or freezer for up to one year.
(Equivalent: 2 cups of delicious vegan butter).
Rating 
 
5.0
June Reviewed by June July 28, 2013
Last updated: September 02, 2013
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (1)

Vegan Butter

Compliments of: Mattie
at Veganbaking.net
http://www.veganbaking.net/fats/vegan-butters/735-vegan-butter#.UfTxu-AkOxI

Vegan Butter (June's version)
(Mattie's original recipe with a few changes)

Ingredients:

1/2 cup organic unsweetened soy milk
1 t. fresh lemon juice
1 t. sea salt
1 t. agar agar powder
1 cup "refined" coconut oil
("Spectrum" is best if available)
1 T. organic walnut, sunflower or safflower oil
1 t. liquid sunflower or soy lecithin
or (2 t. sunflower or soy lecithin granules)

Directions:

Place the soy milk, lemon juice, agar agar and salt in the food processor and mix to emulsify.
Let mixture set to thicken for about 2 minutes.

Add the "refined" coconut oil, choice of organic oil and lecithin. Process for 3 minutes, scraping down the sides to thoroughly mix. Pour the mixture into a covered dish and place it in the refrigerator to solidify (about 10 minutes). Store the butter in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 3 months or freezer for up to one year.
(Equivalent: 2 cups of delicious vegan butter).

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"This hydrogenation process alters the fat structure which also happens to create compounds called triglycerides that are highly toxic to the body. Toxic to the point of where finding local, sustainably raised real butter would ironically probably be a better pseudo-vegan alternative in the grand scheme of things."

Somebody has probably brought this up by now, but your story about triglycerides is total bull****. 'Triglyceride' is just another name for all kinds of fat and/or oil; which is a glycerol molecule which has three fatty acid groups attached to it via ester bonds. These fatty acids can be saturated ('solid' fat), unsaturated (oil) or hydrogenated (oily stuff that's been altered to become solid through a simple process).
Reviewed by WW July 23, 2013

"This hydrogenation process alters the fat structure which also happens to create compounds called triglycerides that are highly toxic to the body. Toxic to the point of where finding local, sustainably raised real butter would ironically probably be a better pseudo-vegan alternative in the grand scheme of things."

Somebody has probably brought this up by now, but your story about triglycerides is total bull****. 'Triglyceride' is just another name for all kinds of fat and/or oil; which is a glycerol molecule which has three fatty acid groups attached to it via ester bonds. These fatty acids can be saturated ('solid' fat), unsaturated (oil) or hydrogenated (oily stuff that's been altered to become solid through a simple process).

Owner's reply

Thanks for catching this WW! I meant to say "trans fatty acids" instead of triglycerides. Triglyceride is just a fancy name for fat and they're totally natural and essential to have in the body in normal amounts. I've corrected the article. Thanks again for helping me be as accurate as possible!

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About one year ago, I posted a review on your fantastic recipe for Vegan Butter. I would like to post your Vegan Butter recipe again with my alternative method as I finally have tried everything possible to make it perfect for all my taste testers (family and friends), and this is the one vegan butter recipe all agree is fantastic! Blessings...

Vegan Butter
(Mattie's original recipe with a few changes)

1/2 cup organic unsweetened soy milk
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon sea salt
1 teaspoons agar agar powder
1/2 cup + 2 Tablespoons "refined" coconut oil
("Spectrum" is best if available)
1 Tablespoon organic sunflower or safflower oil
2 teaspoons sunflower or soy lecithin granules
(or liquid sunflower or soy lecithin)

1) Place the soy milk, lemon juice, agar agar and salt in the food processor and mix to emulsify. Let mixture set to thicken for about
2 minutes.

2) Add the "refined" coconut oil, sunflower oil and lecithin. Process for 3 minutes, scraping down the sides to thoroughly mix. Pour the mixture into a covered mold and place it in the freezer for 15 minutes to solidify. Store butter in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 3 months or freeze in airtight container for up to one year. (Equivalent: 1 cup of vegan butter)
Reviewed by June Taylor July 16, 2013

Vegan Butter

About one year ago, I posted a review on your fantastic recipe for Vegan Butter. I would like to post your Vegan Butter recipe again with my alternative method as I finally have tried everything possible to make it perfect for all my taste testers (family and friends), and this is the one vegan butter recipe all agree is fantastic! Blessings...

Vegan Butter
(Mattie's original recipe with a few changes)

1/2 cup organic unsweetened soy milk
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon sea salt
1 teaspoons agar agar powder
1/2 cup + 2 Tablespoons "refined" coconut oil
("Spectrum" is best if available)
1 Tablespoon organic sunflower or safflower oil
2 teaspoons sunflower or soy lecithin granules
(or liquid sunflower or soy lecithin)

1) Place the soy milk, lemon juice, agar agar and salt in the food processor and mix to emulsify. Let mixture set to thicken for about
2 minutes.

2) Add the "refined" coconut oil, sunflower oil and lecithin. Process for 3 minutes, scraping down the sides to thoroughly mix. Pour the mixture into a covered mold and place it in the freezer for 15 minutes to solidify. Store butter in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 3 months or freeze in airtight container for up to one year. (Equivalent: 1 cup of vegan butter)

Owner's reply

Great recipe June! Do you have a picture of it? If you can get one then I'd love it if you could submit it and we could make this into your own recipe listing on Veganbaking.net. I love the use of agar and lemon juice. I can't wait to try this. Well done and thanks for sharing!

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(Please delete my previous comment which wrongly lumps coconut oil with other vegetable oils.)

Since 2007 it has become common knowledge that omega-6 oils are the principle cause in the US of exploding obesity, heart disease, arthritis and some cancers. In 1900 people ate omega-6 oils in the relationship to omega-3 oils of 2:1. Today it is 16:1.

Coconut oil is about the safest of the vegetable oils. Here is a table from the NIH showing
the omega-6 content for 1 tbs of oil:

coconut 245 mg/tbs
sunflower 505-2957 (depending on type)
safflower 616
palm 1238
soybean 5465
cottonseed 7004
corn 7888
poppy seed 8486

It appears from NIH data that coconut oil is the safest of all the vegetable oils, except for an oil called perilla oil, which is not in common use here, which means coconut oil is the oil of choice.
Rating 
 
5.0
Reviewed by oldtech July 09, 2013

Coconut Oil Safest of All Oils

(Please delete my previous comment which wrongly lumps coconut oil with other vegetable oils.)

Since 2007 it has become common knowledge that omega-6 oils are the principle cause in the US of exploding obesity, heart disease, arthritis and some cancers. In 1900 people ate omega-6 oils in the relationship to omega-3 oils of 2:1. Today it is 16:1.

Coconut oil is about the safest of the vegetable oils. Here is a table from the NIH showing
the omega-6 content for 1 tbs of oil:

coconut 245 mg/tbs
sunflower 505-2957 (depending on type)
safflower 616
palm 1238
soybean 5465
cottonseed 7004
corn 7888
poppy seed 8486

It appears from NIH data that coconut oil is the safest of all the vegetable oils, except for an oil called perilla oil, which is not in common use here, which means coconut oil is the oil of choice.

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This is the OLNY butter recipe we make or use and I can't sing it's praises loud enough! There is no reason to look further once you try this one.
Rating 
 
5.0
svmartin Reviewed by svmartin July 06, 2013
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (1)

Regular Vegan Butter

This is the OLNY butter recipe we make or use and I can't sing it's praises loud enough! There is no reason to look further once you try this one.

Owner's reply

Thanks so much svmartin! I'm so happy the Vegan Butter worked out for you!

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Thank you so much for this recipe! My sister and I made it last night after researching all the problems with palm oil. Not only is this a great substitute for Earth Balance, in my opinion it tastes ten times better! Your scientific research and culinary creativity constructed a masterpiece!
Rating 
 
5.0
Tessa A-A Reviewed by Tessa A-A June 23, 2013
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Revolutionary Butter!

Thank you so much for this recipe! My sister and I made it last night after researching all the problems with palm oil. Not only is this a great substitute for Earth Balance, in my opinion it tastes ten times better! Your scientific research and culinary creativity constructed a masterpiece!

Owner's reply

Thanks and so glad the Vegan Butter worked out for you TessaA-A!

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Ah-MAH-zing
Rating 
 
5.0
mrscalhoun Reviewed by mrscalhoun June 21, 2013
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (1)

Ah-MAH-zing

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I've never made my own vegan butter before but I like how much cheaper and easily customizable it seems to be. I'm trying not to consume too much soy and was wondering if you could possibly tell me if you think this sunflower lecithin would work for this recipe. I've never used any lecithin before and I want to make sure I get the right thing.
http://www.mysunflowerlecithin.com/all-natural-liquid-sunflower-lecithin/
Reviewed by Melissa June 14, 2013

I've never made my own vegan butter before but I like how much cheaper and easily customizable it seems to be. I'm trying not to consume too much soy and was wondering if you could possibly tell me if you think this sunflower lecithin would work for this recipe. I've never used any lecithin before and I want to make sure I get the right thing.
http://www.mysunflowerlecithin.com/all-natural-liquid-sunflower-lecithin/

Owner's reply

Hi Melissa! That and any other sunflower lecithin should work fine in this recipe. Good luck!

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I have the highest hopes for this recipe as I have not been able to successfully veganize my favorite Christmas cut-out butter cookie recipe to date due to, I think, the unavailability of a suitable vegan butter option. The only non-vegan items in my cutouts are butter and 1 egg. HOWEVER, the commercially available vegan butter is all salted and I think that it is the reason why the cookies have an unusual "aftertaste" or "off" flavor on the tongue when I do the substitution with Earth Balance sticks for the butter (I don't think it's the "egg" substitutes b/c I've tried multiple methods to replace the egg and still, the same weird aftertaste remains... hence, my suspicion that the problem is the salted vegan butter replacement). Do you think that I can remove all of the salt from this recipe whenever I want to use it just for 'clean' baking? or does the salt serve an essential purpose/ratios/etc.? The flavor is perfect as written for traditional butter purposes, but I think that I will need to remove the salt to "save" my recipes requiring unsalted butter. Have you tried it without adding the salt for an "unsalted" version? Any suggestions would be so appreciated. [and by the way, THANK YOU for having an AMAZING site/recipes to offer!!!]
Rating 
 
5.0
Tiffanybakes Reviewed by Tiffanybakes June 07, 2013
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (1)

Fingers crossed

I have the highest hopes for this recipe as I have not been able to successfully veganize my favorite Christmas cut-out butter cookie recipe to date due to, I think, the unavailability of a suitable vegan butter option. The only non-vegan items in my cutouts are butter and 1 egg. HOWEVER, the commercially available vegan butter is all salted and I think that it is the reason why the cookies have an unusual "aftertaste" or "off" flavor on the tongue when I do the substitution with Earth Balance sticks for the butter (I don't think it's the "egg" substitutes b/c I've tried multiple methods to replace the egg and still, the same weird aftertaste remains... hence, my suspicion that the problem is the salted vegan butter replacement). Do you think that I can remove all of the salt from this recipe whenever I want to use it just for 'clean' baking? or does the salt serve an essential purpose/ratios/etc.? The flavor is perfect as written for traditional butter purposes, but I think that I will need to remove the salt to "save" my recipes requiring unsalted butter. Have you tried it without adding the salt for an "unsalted" version? Any suggestions would be so appreciated. [and by the way, THANK YOU for having an AMAZING site/recipes to offer!!!]

Owner's reply

Thanks so much Tiffanybakes! The salt is just there to amplify the butteriness and savoriness only. It's redundant if you're using salt in your recipe already, which you probably are. So it doesn't matter if you use salt when making this Vegan Butter or not in terms of texture.

I developed Vegan Butter to use salt so it would be similar to European salted butter in both flavor and texture. This also makes it versatile for spreading on things like toast and other non-baking applications so non-bakers can benefit from it.

Since I rarely eat commercial vegan butters anymore, any time I do, I immediately notice the flavoring (diacetyl) and find it incredibly off putting. Perhaps that's what you're noticing in the cookies? Hopefully this Vegan Butter helps you get closer to nailing your recipe!

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Hi there! Thank you for this great recipe! I can't wait to try it. I have just ordered some soy lecithin liquid online so will have to wait for it to arrive before I can make it. One question, do you think it would work using olive oil in place of the canola/safflower/sunflower oil? I only use olive oil at home and don't really want to buy a whole bottle of canola oil for one recipe..

Btw, for those who can't find soy lecithin liquid anywhere, iherb.com is an amazing website that sells just about anything, at very cheap prices. I just ordered a 473ml bottle of soy lecithin liquid for $7.74 (USD). It's an American company but they ship all over the world, even little old NZ (where I am from). It really is a fantastic website, I have found most products from this website to be cheaper than what I can buy them for here in NZ.

Ps. If you use my code QUG080 you'll get $10 off your first order of $40 or more, or $5 off orders under $40.

Thanks again! :-) :-) :-)
Rating 
 
5.0
Joanie Reviewed by Joanie May 31, 2013
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (1)

Can't wait to try this!

Hi there! Thank you for this great recipe! I can't wait to try it. I have just ordered some soy lecithin liquid online so will have to wait for it to arrive before I can make it. One question, do you think it would work using olive oil in place of the canola/safflower/sunflower oil? I only use olive oil at home and don't really want to buy a whole bottle of canola oil for one recipe..

Btw, for those who can't find soy lecithin liquid anywhere, iherb.com is an amazing website that sells just about anything, at very cheap prices. I just ordered a 473ml bottle of soy lecithin liquid for $7.74 (USD). It's an American company but they ship all over the world, even little old NZ (where I am from). It really is a fantastic website, I have found most products from this website to be cheaper than what I can buy them for here in NZ.

Ps. If you use my code QUG080 you'll get $10 off your first order of $40 or more, or $5 off orders under $40.

Thanks again! :-) :-) :-)

Owner's reply

Hi Joanie! This Vegan Butter will definitely work with olive oil. I've been wanting to do a lemon olive oil version but haven't gotten around to it yet. I also have been meaning to update most of my vegan baking recipes to note that they can be made with light olive oil in addition to safflower, sunflower, etc. Oil choice is like religion;) Olive oil is slightly more solid at refrigerator temperature than canola so the Vegan Butter will probably be a tiny bit more firm but it might not be noticeable. Good luck!

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I have not tried the recipe yet, but I am very anxious to. For months I have agonized over what to use instead of the tried-and-true Earth Balance. Canola oil works so well for cake, bar cookie, quick bread, and yeast bread recipes; but, I had no idea what to do about pastry and other cookies. I especially appreciate the background and process explanation, because I like to know the purpose behind using a particular ingredient or performing a certain task. Thanks again.
Rating 
 
5.0
BigDogsAndBirds Reviewed by BigDogsAndBirds May 31, 2013
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (1)

Thank You!

I have not tried the recipe yet, but I am very anxious to. For months I have agonized over what to use instead of the tried-and-true Earth Balance. Canola oil works so well for cake, bar cookie, quick bread, and yeast bread recipes; but, I had no idea what to do about pastry and other cookies. I especially appreciate the background and process explanation, because I like to know the purpose behind using a particular ingredient or performing a certain task. Thanks again.

Other Info

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Some really good ideas and worth experimenting with. I do have a problem with soya milk though, in fact any unfermented soy product.The only people that ingest these hormone laden poisons are Europeans where we have been fooled into thinking they are healthy when they are not, and our Asian friends know it. As a Chinese cook and they will tell you that in their country soy is primarilly used as a fertilizer, unless it's fermented into sauces or similar. There are non animal non GM curdling agents and rennet which if you can find them are good for making vegetarian, kosher, halal and some vegan cheeses and spreads.
Rating 
 
4.0
Reviewed by Dave Jones May 20, 2013

Some really good ideas and worth experimenting with. I do have a problem with soya milk though, in fact any unfermented soy product.The only people that ingest these hormone laden poisons are Europeans where we have been fooled into thinking they are healthy when they are not, and our Asian friends know it. As a Chinese cook and they will tell you that in their country soy is primarilly used as a fertilizer, unless it's fermented into sauces or similar. There are non animal non GM curdling agents and rennet which if you can find them are good for making vegetarian, kosher, halal and some vegan cheeses and spreads.

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