How to Make Vegan Butter - Regular Vegan Butter - Coconut Oil Base

MattieMattie  
 
5.0 (2)
57

User reviews

2 reviews

Back to Listing
Already have an account?
Ratings (the higher the better)
Rating
Other Info
Comments
Please enter the security code.
258 results - showing 121 - 150  
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9  
Ordering 
 
Rating 
 
5.0

I can't believe it!

I'm newbie vegan and I love it! However, I really missed the butter. Have tried various recipes and bought vegan butter in the store, but nothing has worked for me. Searched a few days ago on Google, something like that; "vegan butter tastes like real butter". Then I found the recipe here. I did not believe it could be possible. But when I read all the ecstatic comments here, I just had to try.
And yes, IT REALLY TASTE LIKE BUTTER! I'm so overwhelmed! Thank you so much for a wonderful recipe. Of course I have written about it on my blog (and of course linked to the page here)! Skandinavian readers can read it here; http://livsmagasinet.no/vegansk-smor-som-virkelig-smaker-som-mejerismor - and the rest of you can see the pictures. :-D

Other Info

Owner's reply

I'm so glad you like it Eva! I just read your blog entry with Google Translate;) Well done and thanks so much for sharing!

Was this review helpful to you? 

My family loves this butter. I found the best milk to use is Blue Diamond Coconut Almond...curdels nice and makes the butter have a wonderful creamy taste.

Owner's reply

Glad you like it Chris! I'll have to try it with the non-dairy milk you recommend.

Was this review helpful to you? 
Rating 
 
5.0

Avoinding Palm Oil thanks to you

Hi Mike, I made this recipe today and due to the fact that I was not able to obtain yet Xantham here in Swittzerland and the Lecithine only in granulated form, I experimented with the Chia in one batch, the AgarAgar in another, with store brand Soy and homemade one (with the wonderful veganstar).

My experiences:

1. Mixing the soy, vinegar and the AgarAgar or Chia from the beginning limited the soy from curdeling as the Chia and AgarAgar emulgated the soy, the chia more than the Agaragar.

2. Curdeling was slightly better with the homemade soydrink (most probably because it had more protein)

3. The soy lecithine granulates did not disolve well (how did the others here managed?) in my Thermomix mixer; only when transferred to the Vitamix did the get grinded well enough. I wonder, if this isn't essential for doing the job in the butter, plus: The butter looks strange with the dots inside. Any idea how to "work" the granulates so that they are more similar to the liquid lecithine?

4. The chia remained such a dark, grey mess (grinded in the Vitamix), that I did not feel like mixing it with the coconut oil. I wonder though what it looks like in the end and if people "liked" the colour of it.

5. Tomorrow, I will sure check around here to see if I can't get my hand on Xantham, so that the experimenting can go on. ;-))))

THANKS for sharing all your wonderful experiences with us here. BR from Zurich!

Owner's reply

Thanks for the detailed analysis Isabelle! It would seem that adding things like chia and agar to the soy milk/acid mix would in fact inhibit curdling and, hence flavor development because the starches in the chia/agar would coat the proteins, keeping the acids from affecting them as thoroughly.

In regards to #2 in your comment, you're most likely correct. This is why I don't use rice or coconut milk for Vegan Butter. Regarding #3, I usually food process the mixture with the lecithin granules until they disappear which usually takes a few minutes in a slightly warm liquid. Perhaps the solubility of lecithin granules varies from brand to brand? I tested the recipe with Kalustyan's brand (from NYC) but I exclusively use liquid lecithin now because I have a TON of it. The lecithin is necessary to make the butter melt with 'placticity' which is important for spreading and things like puff pastry.

Regarding #4, I haven't tested Vegan Butter with chia seeds yet because I know they're going to make the consistency grainy and I just don't want that. But, you should be able to take 1/3 cup chia or flax seeds, 1 1/2 cup water, boil them in a small saucepan for about 20 minutes and strain off the seeds from the 'mucilage'. What you'll be left with is just the liquid mucilage which you can add to the vegan butter (exact amount still to be determined, but probably 1 teaspoon) in place of xanthan gum. I'm in early testing phases with this but it looks promising. Good luck!

Was this review helpful to you? 
Rating 
 
5.0

thanks

thank you so much
it was pretty nice.
i love this recipe!!!

Was this review helpful to you? 
Rating 
 
5.0

Delicious and easy!

This recipe is glorious. Easy and tastes amazing. I wanted a spreadable butter so I swapped 1 tbsp of coconut oil for 1 tbsp of vegetable oil, just as the recipe suggests. I love it!! 5 stars, EASY. Next time I make pie crust I'll make it again and stick to the original recipe that makes the harder butter.

Owner's reply

So glad this worked out for you applatt!

Was this review helpful to you? 

Wondering

Could you use unsweetened coconut milk in place of the soy milk?

Was this review helpful to you? 

hi
i was wondering if i could use rice milk instead of soy milk as i cannot buy rice milk where i live

Was this review helpful to you? 
Rating 
 
5.0

chia seeds for xanthan gum

great recipe! i often use coconut oil directly in baking and the result is, well, too oily! i can't wait to give this a try.

for those interested in a xanthan gum substitute, too bad you didn't read through the comments. this has been discussed and people found success with chia seeds.

Was this review helpful to you? 

no microwave

I would like to try this recipe, but I don't use microwave, can I melt coconut oil on stove?

Other Info

Was this review helpful to you? 
Rating 
 
5.0

This is better than butter in every way!

Was this review helpful to you? 

Substitute for Coconut Oil?

We have severe tree nut allergies and since our allergist feels that coconut is a tree nut (as does the FDA now) that we cannot do this, but we really need some soy margarine desperately! Cannot do commercial brands due to the corn flavorings (corn allergy too!). Is there anything else that can be used in place of coconut oil?

Owner's reply

Hi Suzanne, To make a coconut oil-free version try using deodorized cocoa butter (available online) and swap out about 1 Teaspoon of it for an additional teaspoon of vegetable oil so it solidifies to the proper texture. Good luck!

Was this review helpful to you? 
Rating 
 
5.0

Thank you!

This recipe has brought the joy of vegemite toast back to my hubs. Excellent taste / texture!!

Was this review helpful to you? 
Rating 
 
5.0

Hemp milk

Just commenting - i made a second batch, since the thanksgiving batch is gone. I still used hemp milk. but this time i left it out on the counter for a few hours, and then nuked it slightly warm before adding the lemon juice (and used only the required amount), let it sit a few more hours - and it COMPLETELY separated in to whey and . . well, thicker stuff lol. I have problems w vinegar so thats why i used lemon juice. last time instead of being patient i added twice as much lemon plus some vinegar. It curdled, but the vinegar smell (sensitive to it due to allergies) really bothered me. this version is much creamier and tastier than the last one i did

ok, sorry if thats too much detail, but just to say, I DID get satisfactory results using hemp milk.

Owner's reply

Thanks for the hemp milk update Cara!

Was this review helpful to you? 
Rating 
 
5.0

Measurements

This recipe is really great -- I love the experimental basis of your work, and the opportunities for vegan baking this affords. One question for you: all of your quantities are in volume, and it would seem to me that using mass (in grams) would be more precise. Did you happen to weigh out your ingredients as you were recording this recipe? If so would you care to share them for those of us with fine scales in our kitchens?

Owner's reply

Weight measurements is a great idea Drew! I have 'seen the light' and use weight measurements in most of the recipe development I do nowadays. I'm planning on updating every recipe on Veganbaking.net with the addition of weight measurements, starting with the Vegan Butter Recipes when I can find the time.

Was this review helpful to you? 
Rating 
 
5.0

replacement for lecithin?

I'm living in Asia and have not been able to find lecithin as of yet. Can anyone recommend a replacement emulsifier?

Owner's reply

Hi loofa! You may be able to take flax seed puree and strain off the gel in a water solution but I haven't tested this yet. I probably will soon due to the issues people are having obtaining lecithin and xanthan gum. If/when I do, I'll be sure to update the recipe. Good luck!

Was this review helpful to you? 

confused

Forgive me if I've got this wrong, I'm trying to understand this. Coconut oil is solid at room temperature. This recipe is an emulsion of barely warm oil with a few other ingredients. This isn't making a liquid oil into a solid like other margarines. It's making a solid into a tastier solid. Do all emulsions introduce hydrogenated fats into the end result?

Owner's reply

Hi DeeG!

You are correct. This Vegan Butter recipe is just a blend of fats, water, flavorings and emulsifiers to get it all to play nice together. Hydrogenated oils are liquid fats that have hydrogen passed through them that changes the chemical structure of the fat, causing it to behave like a saturated (solid) fat, resulting in bad things like trans fats. My Vegan Butter recipe avoids all that.

Was this review helpful to you? 
Rating 
 
4.0

Process is Still Likely to Create Triglicerides

I really like the recipe for making vegan butter, but I would stress that you are essentially doing the same thing chemically to the fat in your recipe as the people who make Crisco (and Earth Balance for that matter). Whenever someone makes any fat (plant, animal) more stable at room temperature (i.e. solid) the fats go through a hydrogenation process to add hydrogen to the lipid structure. This process increases the melting point of the fat. Commercial companies that make Crisco use an extrusion machine to accomplish this task. Earth Balance's process is the exact same, they just market their product differently. Butter churning breaks down the fats in cream and chemically changes them into a solid. Your process is using the speed of the food processor blades to break down the liquid fats into a structure that stays solid at room temperature. All of these processes share one thing in common; they all produce trans fats (triglycerides).

All that being said, I do really like your process and recipe. I would just caution making any claims that this process is somehow healthier than any other hydrogenation process commercial companies use. But as a DIY vegan butter recipe, I don't think there's a better one on the web.
I've included some good reading on the extrusion process and how commercial manufactures http://www.aseanfood.info/Articles/11024149.pdf

Owner's reply

Hi Jon, Thanks for your input. I think you're getting the food production procedure known as "extrusion" confused with butter production as well as vegan butter production. Food extrusion is not used for the processing of fats in the food industry as far as I'm aware. Food extrusion is used to squeeze, cook and press out products like pastas, dog food, veggie jerky, etc in a corkscrew-like configuration.

Crisco is a hydrogenated fat which is produced when hydrogen is passed through a fat (typically monounsaturated) that is liquid at room temperature. This hydrogenation process chemically alters the fat to act like a saturated fat, producing trans fats in the process. On the molecular level, the carbon chains that make up the fats are modified so they pack together more tightly, making the fat crystalize (get solid) at a lower temperature. Margarine manufacturers do this because they can take a affordable oil such as soy oil and turn it into a solid fat at a very low cost.

Fats coming from tropical regions are known as lauric fats and usually contain enough saturated fats to not need any chemical processing to make them more solid. On the molecular level, their carbon chains are also packed tightly like hydrogenated fats, but they don't contain trans fats like hydrogenated oils do.

Both Earth Balance and my method of Vegan Butter uses lauric fats blended with monounsaturated fats get the fat to a desired consistency. Mixing these fats via whisk, food processor or even by bare hand has no chemical effect and will not produce any hydrogenation related compounds. Furthermore, butter production is completely different- it involves churning which strip liquid surrounding dispersed fat globules which allows the globules to congeal into a solid mass.

There is a debate on the health aspects of plant-based saturated fats though. It depends on who you talk to in regards to whether it's more or less healthy than animal-based saturated fat. Thanks for the article link. It was a fascinating read on how extrusion effects nutrient content in foods. I'd love to get one of these but I'm about $80,000 short!
Thanks again for your input!

Was this review helpful to you? 
Rating 
 
5.0

THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!!!

This is BY FAR the best vegan butter I have ever tasted. The flavor is complex yet simple and delicious. And yes, it doesn't leave an unwelcome oily finish in the mouth. Color is appetizing, and NO PALM OIL... YAY!!!

Thank you, I made the recipe exactly as written, using the liquid lecithin.

Was this review helpful to you? 

Can I make this allergy free?

This sounds really great! We have pretty extreme allergies in my house and can't have things like soy or gluten. I see I can use sunflower lecithin (great sub, thanks for that!) and was wondering if anyone knows if i could use hemp milk rather than soy. I don't think rice milk would work and almond or coconut milk would taste terrible. Thanks for any feed back!

Owner's reply

Hi Stephanie, although hemp milk won't coagulate as much as soy milk and won't produce as much buttery flavors, it should still work. Let me know how it works if you get a chance to try it!

Was this review helpful to you? 
Rating 
 
5.0

Really good butter taste

This turned out really well and was very easy. This opens up all kinds of possible variations. I think you hit the nail on the head with the addition of ACV. It's much closer to dairy butter than EB.

Was this review helpful to you? 
Rating 
 
5.0

Yes rice milk is acidic so it curdles in tea

Ok did a quick search. I am seeing people post that rice milk curdles in tea but their soy milk didn't do that.

I checked and tea is usually alkaline. IF this is correct it confirms what I thought. To curdle rice milk you need an alkaline to reach its isoelectric point.

The way you need an acid to make soy milk(an alkaline) to reach its isoelectric point.

I have not looked at almond and the other milks listed above but have a feeling they would be the same.

I will try this tomorrow when I make some rice milk.

Owner's reply

Thanks for your input Mike! I refer to rice milk as one of the "white water milks" meaning that it really doesn't have any concrete substance to it to really do much of anything in a recipe. The curdling is most likely little rice particles separating out of suspension because there's not nearly enough protein to curdle.

This is also why protein is directly proportional to how much non-diary milks curdle. It's my understanding that alkaline solutions won't have this same effect but haven't tried it in-depth. Let me know if it works for you!

Was this review helpful to you? 
Rating 
 
5.0

GREAT info thank you!

Mattie,

Thank you for such a DETAILED recipe and info!

My understanding is that vinegar makes the soy milk curdle (it is a neutral acidity the same as regular milk) because it took it to PH of 4.6 which happens to be the isoelectric point of soy milk as well as regular milk.

Rice milk is already acidic and an acid forming food. Perhaps this is why it didn't curdle.

I wonder if adding an alkaline would make it curdle?

Off to see what the isoelectric point is of rice milk and to find an liquid alkaline which will take it to that PH.

Thank you again!

Was this review helpful to you? 
Rating 
 
5.0

This is AWESOME

I decided to become vegan in September, and one thing I missed more than anything, was garlic butter. So I decided to try this recipe (but also substituted the xanthan gum with chia seeds), and I love it. I made a blind test for my cousin, who couldn't taste which was her butter and which was my vegan "butter". Oh, and it was easy and fun to make once I had converted all the measurements. Thank you so much for this.

Owner's reply

Glad this worked out Christina! That's great you had such great success with the chia seeds and on the taste test. I'm planning on doing further testing with chia seeds, flax seeds and okra pods to see if I can get around using the lecithin and xanthan gums. I'll update the recipe if any of these work out in the future.

Was this review helpful to you? 
Rating 
 
5.0

A few notes for vegan butter recipe

I forgot to mention. I made two separate batches and in one I accidently added the lecithin to the heated oil before it cooled and this was actually a good thing, since in the other batch it didn't mix completely, I could still see bits. Also, for anyone who prefers or needs a little yellow -a tiny, tiny bit of tumeric does the trick!

Was this review helpful to you? 
Rating 
 
5.0

OMG this stuff is wonderful!

In 2001, my husband and his grandfather went on a dairy splurge (or second childhood, you choose) Yoohoo, grilled cheese, chocolate milk, chocolate malted milk, etc. After 2 weeks, my husband began breaking out in a very ugly rash, sebaceous excema. I won't describe it but it was seriously ugly. After some internet research, I suggested milk allergy, after 2 days without dairy his skin started healing. For the last 12 years he has been living dairy-free. The allergy has lessened somewhat but occasionally he'll get a stomach ache, rash even throat swelling! There is dairy hidden everywhere! I looked for this recipe because I wanted to make croissants, he misses chocolate croissants especially. OMG, this is so awesome! I did lab research and was very impressed and grateful for your careful research. Husband says it tastes like the wonderful creamery butter you get at farmer's markets. Even after 12 years, he remembers the taste, so thank you for making his life richer, I love him so much, I really appreciate all you did to bring this recipe to the online seekers!

Was this review helpful to you? 
Rating 
 
5.0

Thank you for saving thanksgiving!

Finding a butter sub is such a hard challenge! we are avoiding dairy, soy and canola. Which leaves us plain coconut oil or palm oil shortening. I made the regular vegan butter using hemp milk (and extra vinegar lol), guar gum (problems w xanthan) and untoasted sesame seed for the oil, because i bought it by accident and love its flavor and texture. the butter smelled a bit of vinegar to me - but i dont really use butter on bread, i used it for baking, and for that it was fantastic! thank you

Was this review helpful to you? 
Rating 
 
5.0

Oh. My. Gosh. Amazing!

This recipe is utterly amazing. Please commercialise it! While the bulk of it is still cooling I've drizzled some onto a piece of toast... Yum. High praise from someone who only used butter, never margarine, until a year ago when I went largely dairy free (BCM7 free) and gluten free. This will be tested in gluten free puff pastry shortly... the reason I attempted this recipe. THANKS. p.s. in Australia, use Bonsoy Soy Milk, Cornwells Apple Cider Vinegar, Cloud Nine Coconut Oil Organic (unrefined but naturally purified to remove taste and odour). I bought two soys, chose the more strongly aromatic, two apple cider vinegars, chose the less aromatic, superb results.

Was this review helpful to you? 
Rating 
 
5.0

I get my coconut oil from therawfoodworld.com in gallon tubs. It is raw though and costs $59.95 unless they are having a special. Thank you so much, Mattie, for sharing this recipe. We are all (including the animals) grateful that you willingly share vegan recipes to help people steer clear of animal products.

Was this review helpful to you? 

Yay!

How does this vegan butter "act" in pastries"? I like flaky pastry when it comes to pies. Does anyone know or has anyone tried?

Was this review helpful to you? 
Rating 
 
5.0

An extraordinarily rich, creamy butter!

Bravo, Mattie, for sharing with us this superlative recipe, which produces an extraordinarily rich, creamy, buttery-tasting vegan butter! I'm recently vegan by necessity (due to diverticulitis) and have been bemoaning the need to give up my beloved pies, cakes, cookies, waffles, pancakes, and biscuits. I assumed that I was doomed to a future of ersatz, non-buttery, artificial tasting “butter” spreads and tasteless baked goods – until I made Mattie’s vegan butter last week. That butter was so wonderful that I used it all within a week on my whole-grain toast, rice pilaf, pasta, roasted potatoes, and morning oatmeal. (For three days my husband thought I was pulling his leg and was actually using an imported European butter from Whole Foods!) Earlier today I made Mattie’s luscious Ultimate Brownies, as well as his velvety smooth Chocolate Frosting. This vegan butter bakes as well as it blends into biscuit dough and melts on toast and waffles. It displays all the versatile qualities of an excellent dairy butter. Thank you so much for this extraordinary recipe, Mattie! I foresee many, many years of baking and enjoying a variety of delicious pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, and brownies. I intend to try Mattie's pie crust next, and I've no doubt it will be as excellent as his butter and brownie recipes. Yes, there is indeed life after dairy butter! Thank you again, Mattie!

Owner's reply

So glad the Vegan Butter worked out for you Jean!

Was this review helpful to you? 
258 results - showing 121 - 150  
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9