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Vegan Nine Grain Whole Wheat Bread Mattie

Written by Mattie    
 
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Nine Grain Whole Wheat Bread

This Vegan Nine Grain Whole Wheat Bread recipe is unique in that it sports nine grains and contains 100% whole wheat flour for the rest of the ingredients which adds a superb flavor and texture not found in many other breads. Baking a bread with both of these features involves a little more effort but I think you'll agree that it's time well spent. This bread differs from a regular bread recipe in two ways: First, the grains are soaked so they soften and integrate into the loaf. Second, since we're using 100% whole wheat flour for the rest of the flour we need to soak it overnight so the bran softens. This softened bran will enable a more efficient rise because the bran won't cut gluten strands. It will also allow for a more supple crumb. These soaked flour and grains are technically referred to as, what else? A soaker. I suspect the bread baker who coined this term was having a creativity block the day he named this method.

The benefits of using a soaker in bread baking

I know what you're thinking. That's lots of soaking right? But all that soaking has another benefit! The soaking of the grains and flour also enhances the flavor of the bread because during the soaking process, enzymes break out sugar from the grains which produces more flavor complexity.

Don't be afraid to raid the grain silo when selecting grains for this bread

Since this bread has a large amount of grains displacing the flour, it's a low-flour bread which is healthier because it has a lower glycemic index. Each grain brings it's own characteristics and nutritional benefits to the table. Feel free to swap out any of the six pre-cooked grains with other types you may have on hand. The grains I used in the here is what I was able to find in several health food stores at the time. They should be measured dry. Once you've made this loaf and it's come out to your liking I encourage you to buy an extra loaf pan or three and make this bread in multiple batches to save you time.

Find more Healthy recipes on Veganbaking.net

Vegan Nine Grain Whole Wheat Bread Recipe

1 ½ cups + 2 Tablespoons warm water
1 ¼ teaspoons active dry yeast

2 ¾ cups whole wheat flour
2 Tablespoons + 1 teaspoon rolled oats

2 Tablespoons + 1 teaspoon amaranth
2 Tablespoons + 1 teaspoon buckwheat
2 Tablespoons + 1 teaspoon quinoa
2 Tablespoons + 1 teaspoon barley
2 Tablespoons + 1 teaspoon millet
2 Tablespoons + 1 teaspoon spelt
2 Tablespoons + 1 teaspoon kamut

1 ¼ teaspoons salt

1) Activate your yeast

In a small mixing bowl, whisk together the warm water and yeast. let the mixture sit for about 10 minutes so the yeast activates.

2) Whisk together the flour and oats

In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the flour and oats.

3) Make your pre-ferment, or poolish

Add the wet ingredients to the bowl containg the dry ingredients  and mix it with a spoon for about 1 minute so it's just incorporated. Cover the bowl with a plastic bag or a plate and allow the mixture to sit until it has doubled in size, about 1 ½ hours. Transfer the covered bowl to the refrigerator for 12 to 24 hours. This step helps break out more sugars from the flour that the yeast can use to develop flavor. It also softens the bran on the wheat for a softer crumb.

4) Soak your grains

Rinse the amaranth, buckwheat, quinoa, barley, millet, spelt and kamut. Transfer them to a medium mixing bowl and soak for about 24 hours.

5) Mix the dough and allow it to rise

Remove the grains and flour mixtures from the refrigerator. Drain the grains and add them to the bowl containing the flour and yeast. Sprinkle in the salt and knead in the grains until well incorporated, about 4 minutes. Cover the bowl with a plastic bag and let it rise until doubled in size, about 3 hours.

6) Place the dough in the loaf pan and allow it to proof or rise one last time

Roll the dough out into a square with edges that are the length of your loaf pan. Gently roll up the dough into a cylinder and place it in a lightly oiled loaf pan. Let it sit covered with a plastic bag until it reaches about 80% to 90% of its intended size, which should be about 40 to 60 minutes. The dough should now be domed. The proofing stage is where the dough takes most of it's shape. It's important to leave room under the plastic bag so the dough can rise sufficiently.

7) Bake the bread to perfection

Preheat your oven to 375F (191C). Remove the plastic bag so the dough can rest for about 10 minutes while your oven is preheating. During the baking process, the dough will rise another 10% to 20% of its intended size in the process known as oven spring. Bake until the internal temperature of the dough is 180-190F (82-88C) when read by an instant-read thermometer or until the bread sounds hollow when the underside of the loaf pan is tapped with a blunt object such as a rolling pin. This should take about 45 minutes. Rotate the loaf 180 degrees in the oven halfway through the baking duration for even baking.

8) Allow the bread to cool slightly before removing from the loaf pan

Remove the bread from the loaf pan after about 15 minutes. Allow the bread to cool on a wire rack until it's room temperature. This bread is best stored covered in a cool dark place or pre-sliced and stored in a plastic freezer bag in the freezer. This recipe makes one loaf of Vegan Nine Grain Whole Wheat Bread.

Mixed grains


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Hi Mattie,

the bread sounds so yummo! Is a loaf form really required or could I just roll it up and put it on a baking tray?

Also if I don't have a thermometer, can I just take it out after 45 Mins or test it with a cake tester?

Looking forward to your reply to go and try it out!
Cheers
Raspberry
Raspberry Reviewed by Raspberry April 10, 2013
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (1)

Hi Mattie,

the bread sounds so yummo! Is a loaf form really required or could I just roll it up and put it on a baking tray?

Also if I don't have a thermometer, can I just take it out after 45 Mins or test it with a cake tester?

Looking forward to your reply to go and try it out!
Cheers
Raspberry

Owner's reply

Hi Raspberry! The dough is really moist to ensure the load is springy. This moistness makes it unsuitable for baking without a loaf pan. If you attempted to bake it hearth style it would spread out too much. You could experiment with reducing the water content but it might take you a few tries to get it right.

Regarding baking time, if I don't have a thermometer I'll bake it until the loaf sounds hollow when tapped with a blunt object such as a rolling pin. I'm going to update the recipe to reflect that. A cake tester is usually not suitable for breads because it will show no crumbs even when the bread needs to be baked longer. Good luck!

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Hi,

When I was making the poolish, I left it out for 4 hours and by accident it turned into overnight. After 4, it was supposed to be refrigerated, will it still be ok?

Thanks!
Reviewed by Heather July 06, 2012

Hi,

When I was making the poolish, I left it out for 4 hours and by accident it turned into overnight. After 4, it was supposed to be refrigerated, will it still be ok?

Thanks!

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Sorry if this is a dumb question, but I usually use pearl barley in soups. Is that the kind of barley to use in this recipe? Or, is there another kind?
Reviewed by Stacey December 22, 2011

Barley question...

Sorry if this is a dumb question, but I usually use pearl barley in soups. Is that the kind of barley to use in this recipe? Or, is there another kind?

Owner's reply

Hi Stacey, pearled barley is just regular barley with the husk removed. It'll work fine in this recipe. Good luck!

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Hi Mattie,
I made this bread yesterday and sliced it today and I really like it with all the grains. I was wondering about the amount of flour though: my dough - even after the 4+24h rise remained extremely wet (yes, I drained the water from the grains) so that I added another cup of ww flour. Even then the dough was too wet to be rolled so I just dumped it in the loaf pan. The result is a firm enough bread but quite, hm, wet? springy? doughy? Don't get me wrong: it's certainly bread, certainly not a failure but I was wondering whether I did something wrong. Perhaps I didn't bake it long enough (I don't have one of these thermometers with which to test the temperature in the bread) but in any case the amount of flour seems really far off the mark to me. When I make this again - and I certainly will - I'll probably add another 1.5 cups of ww flour to the original recipe when I add the soaked grains. What do you think?
Thanks for the recipe and your help, Boris
Reviewed by Boris October 04, 2011

Hi Mattie,
I made this bread yesterday and sliced it today and I really like it with all the grains. I was wondering about the amount of flour though: my dough - even after the 4+24h rise remained extremely wet (yes, I drained the water from the grains) so that I added another cup of ww flour. Even then the dough was too wet to be rolled so I just dumped it in the loaf pan. The result is a firm enough bread but quite, hm, wet? springy? doughy? Don't get me wrong: it's certainly bread, certainly not a failure but I was wondering whether I did something wrong. Perhaps I didn't bake it long enough (I don't have one of these thermometers with which to test the temperature in the bread) but in any case the amount of flour seems really far off the mark to me. When I make this again - and I certainly will - I'll probably add another 1.5 cups of ww flour to the original recipe when I add the soaked grains. What do you think?
Thanks for the recipe and your help, Boris

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King Arthur flour sells a harvest grain mix that would work in this and be easier than buying them all separate
http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/harvest-grains-blend-2-lb .
Reviewed by Monica September 28, 2011

Grain packages

King Arthur flour sells a harvest grain mix that would work in this and be easier than buying them all separate
http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/harvest-grains-blend-2-lb .

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Hi Mattie,

Thank you for the recipe. Im going to try it today. Hope it turns out well.
Since I only have Flax seeds and Oats with me, Im going to try it with only 2 grains.... Will let u know how it comes.

I was just wondering if we would get Multi-grains in a packet(Mixed together) instead of buying EACH grain separately. I tried in couple of supermarkets but in vain:(
Pls let me know if we can get them mixed together in a bag somewhere?


Thanks,
Vidya
vidyaravind Reviewed by vidyaravind May 10, 2011
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (1)

Reg 9 grains

Hi Mattie,

Thank you for the recipe. Im going to try it today. Hope it turns out well.
Since I only have Flax seeds and Oats with me, Im going to try it with only 2 grains.... Will let u know how it comes.

I was just wondering if we would get Multi-grains in a packet(Mixed together) instead of buying EACH grain separately. I tried in couple of supermarkets but in vain:(
Pls let me know if we can get them mixed together in a bag somewhere?


Thanks,
Vidya

Owner's reply

Hi Vidya, I usually go to several health food stores to get the grains I need. The recipe should work with any grains you have on hand. Good luck!

Was this review helpful to you? 
Hi Mattie,

Thank you for the recipe. Im going to try it today. Hope it turns out well.
Since I only have Flax seeds and Oats with me, Im going to try it with only 2 grains.... Will let u know how it comes.

I was just wondering if we would get Multi-grains in a packet(Mixed together) instead of buying EACH grain separately. I tried in couple of supermarkets but in vain:(
Pls let me know if we can get them mixed together in a bag somewhere?


Thanks,
Vidya
Reviewed by Vidya Aravind May 10, 2011

Reg 9 grains

Hi Mattie,

Thank you for the recipe. Im going to try it today. Hope it turns out well.
Since I only have Flax seeds and Oats with me, Im going to try it with only 2 grains.... Will let u know how it comes.

I was just wondering if we would get Multi-grains in a packet(Mixed together) instead of buying EACH grain separately. I tried in couple of supermarkets but in vain:(
Pls let me know if we can get them mixed together in a bag somewhere?


Thanks,
Vidya

Was this review helpful to you? 
Hi Mattie,

Thank you for the recipe. Im going to try it today. Hope it turns out well.
Since I only have Flax seeds and Oats with me, Im going to try it with only 2 grains.... Will let u know how it comes.

I was just wondering if we would get Multi-grains in a packet(Mixed together) instead of buying EACH grain separately. I tried in couple of supermarkets but in vain:(
Pls let me know if we can get them mixed together in a bag somewhere?


Thanks,
Vidya
Reviewed by Vidya May 10, 2011

Reg 9 grains

Hi Mattie,

Thank you for the recipe. Im going to try it today. Hope it turns out well.
Since I only have Flax seeds and Oats with me, Im going to try it with only 2 grains.... Will let u know how it comes.

I was just wondering if we would get Multi-grains in a packet(Mixed together) instead of buying EACH grain separately. I tried in couple of supermarkets but in vain:(
Pls let me know if we can get them mixed together in a bag somewhere?


Thanks,
Vidya

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